KCNK9

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Potassium channel, subfamily K, member 9
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe, RCSB
Identifiers
Symbols KCNK9 ; K2p9.1; KT3.2; TASK-3; TASK3
External IDs OMIM605874 MGI3521816 HomoloGene56758 IUPHAR: K2P9.1 GeneCards: KCNK9 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE KCNK9 gnf1h00252 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 51305 223604
Ensembl ENSG00000169427 ENSMUSG00000036760
UniProt Q9NPC2 Q3LS21
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_001282534 NM_001033876
RefSeq (protein) NP_001269463 NP_001029048
Location (UCSC) Chr 8:
140.61 – 140.72 Mb
Chr 15:
72.51 – 72.55 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Potassium channel subfamily K member 9 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the KCNK9 gene.[1][2][3]

This gene encodes K2P9.1, one of the members of the superfamily of potassium channel proteins containing two pore-forming P domains. This open channel is highly expressed in the cerebellum. It is inhibited by extracellular acidification and arachidonic acid, and strongly inhibited by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate.[3] Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate is also known as 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA).

Expression[edit]

The KCNK9 gene is expressed as an ion channel more commonly known as TASK 3. This channel has a varied pattern of expression. TASK 3 is coexpressed with TASK 1 (KCNK3) in the cerebellar granule cells, locus coeruleus, motor neurons, pontine nuclei, some cells in the neocortex, habenula, olfactory bulb granule cells, and cells in the external plexiform layer of the olfactory bulb.[4] TASK-3 channels are also expressed in the hippocampus; both on pyramidal cells and interneurons.[5] It is thought that these channels may form heterodimers where their expressions co-localise.[6][7]

Function[edit]

Mice in which the TASK-3 gene has been deleted have reduced sensitivity to inhalation anaesthetics, exaggerated nocturnal activity and cognitive deficits as well as significantly increased appetite and weight gain.[8][9] A role for TASK-3 channels in neuronal network oscillations has also been described: TASK-3 knockout mice lack the atropine-sensitive halothane-induced theta oscillation (4–7 Hz) from the hippocampus and are unable to maintain theta oscillations during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep.[9]


Interactive pathway map[edit]

Click on genes, proteins and metabolites below to link to respective articles. [§ 1]

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Nicotine Activity on Dopaminergic Neurons edit
  1. ^ The interactive pathway map can be edited at WikiPathways: "NicotineDopaminergic_WP1602". 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kim Y, Bang H, Kim D (May 2000). "TASK-3, a new member of the tandem pore K(+) channel family". J Biol Chem 275 (13): 9340–7. doi:10.1074/jbc.275.13.9340. PMID 10734076. 
  2. ^ Goldstein SA, Bayliss DA, Kim D, Lesage F, Plant LD, Rajan S (Dec 2005). "International Union of Pharmacology. LV. Nomenclature and molecular relationships of two-P potassium channels". Pharmacol Rev 57 (4): 527–40. doi:10.1124/pr.57.4.12. PMID 16382106. 
  3. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: KCNK9 potassium channel, subfamily K, member 9". 
  4. ^ Bayliss DA, Sirois JE, Talley EM (June 2003). "The TASK family: two-pore domain background K+ channels.". Molecular interventions 3 (4): 205–19. doi:10.1124/mi.3.4.205. PMID 14993448. 
  5. ^ Torborg CL, Berg AP, Jeffries BW, Bayliss DA, McBain CJ (Jul 12, 2006). "TASK-like conductances are present within hippocampal CA1 stratum oriens interneuron subpopulations.". The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience 26 (28): 7362–7. doi:10.1523/jneurosci.1257-06.2006. PMID 16837582. 
  6. ^ Berg AP, Talley EM, Manger JP, Bayliss DA (Jul 28, 2004). "Motoneurons express heteromeric TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels containing TASK-1 (KCNK3) and TASK-3 (KCNK9) subunits.". The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience 24 (30): 6693–702. doi:10.1523/jneurosci.1408-04.2004. PMID 15282272. 
  7. ^ Kang D, Han J, Talley EM, Bayliss DA, Kim D (Jan 1, 2004). "Functional expression of TASK-1/TASK-3 heteromers in cerebellar granule cells.". The Journal of physiology 554 (Pt 1): 64–77. doi:10.1113/jphysiol.2003.054387. PMID 14678492. 
  8. ^ Linden AM, Aller MI, Leppä E, Rosenberg PH, Wisden W, Korpi ER (October 2008). "K+ channel TASK-1 knockout mice show enhanced sensitivities to ataxic and hypnotic effects of GABA(A) receptor ligands.". The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics 327 (1): 277–86. doi:10.1124/jpet.108.142083. PMID 18660435. 
  9. ^ a b Pang DS, Robledo CJ, Carr DR, Gent TC, Vyssotski AL, Caley A, Zecharia AY, Wisden W, Brickley SG, Franks NP (Oct 13, 2009). "An unexpected role for TASK-3 potassium channels in network oscillations with implications for sleep mechanisms and anesthetic action.". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 106 (41): 17546–51. doi:10.1073/pnas.0907228106. PMID 19805135. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.