KRMS

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KRMS
KRMS-AM NewsTalk 1150 logo.png
City of license Osage Beach, Missouri
Broadcast area Lake of the Ozarks
Branding NewsTalk 1150 KRMS
Frequency 1150 kHz
Translator(s) 97.5 K248BP (Osage Beach)
First air date December 1952
Format News/Talk
Language(s) English
Power 1,000 watts (day)
55 watts (night)
Class D
Facility ID 35554
Transmitter coordinates 38°7′29″N 92°40′39″W / 38.12472°N 92.67750°W / 38.12472; -92.67750
Callsign meaning Robert M. Smith (original owner)[1]
Owner Viper Communications, Inc.
Sister stations KMYK
Webcast Listen Live
Website krmsradio.com

KRMS (1150 AM, "NewsTalk 1150") is a radio station licensed to serve Osage Beach, Missouri, USA. The station, originally established in December 1952, is currently owned by Viper Communications, Inc., and broadcasts news/talk programming to central Missouri.

Programming[edit]

KRMS broadcasts a news/talk/sports format to Osage Beach and the greater Lake of the Ozarks area.[2] Weekday programming includes nationally syndicated talk shows hosted by Rush Limbaugh, Dave Ramsey, Mark Levin, and Jim Bohannon. Local weekday programs include Ozarks This Morning with KB, The Morning Magazine with Manny Haley., and The Ozarks Today with Hoof & Samantha. Overnight programing features Coast to Coast AM with George Noory.[3]

History[edit]

The beginning[edit]

This station began regular daytime-only broadcast operations in December 1952 under the ownership of broadcast license holder and station president Robert M. Smith.[1] Broadcasting with 1,000 watts of power on an assigned frequency of 1150 kHz, the new station was assigned the call sign KRMS by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).[4] The station's initial staff included general manager was Ed Gardiner, chief engineer Wally Clark, news director Hal Martin, and program director M.T. Gardiner.[1]

In 1954, Smith transferred the broadcast license for KRMS to a new company, Central Missouri Broadcasting, of which he was president and majority owner.[5] About a year later, in 1955, KRMS was sold to Lawrence Broadcasters, Inc.[6] This new license holder was run by company president A.P. D'Ambra and general manager Arden Booth.[6][7]

Risner era[edit]

The station was sold again on May 27, 1959, to Central Missouri Broadcasting Company under the co-ownership of James L. Risner and Ella Mae Risner.[8] James Risner also served as the station's general manager, chief engineer, and commercial manager. Ella Mae Risner worked as the station's program director and promotions manager.[8] Aside from signing-on FM sister station KRMS-FM (now KMYK) in April 1964, this owner/operator situation would remain unchanged through the end of the 1970s.[9][10]

In October 1979, the Risners agreed to transfer the broadcast license and the station's assets to Lakcom, a limited partnership with Alfred C. Sikes as General Partner. This deal was approved by the FCC on January 10, 1980, and consummated on January 16, 1980.[11] The new owners maintained the country format on the AM (KRMS) and programmed the FM (KYLC) as an oldies-based adult contemporary station. Minority owner and general manager, Rod Orr, went on to purchase the radio stations, clearing the way for Sikes to be nominated Chair of the FCC.

Decade of change[edit]

Lakcom L.P. reached an agreement to sell KRMS to a new company called KRMS-KYLC, Inc., in April 1986.[12] The deal was approved by the FCC on May 30, 1986, and the transaction was formally consummated on June 11, 1986. Among the company's investors was United States Senator John C. Danforth.[13] In April 1990, the company, now wholly owned by John B. and Fredna B. Mahaffey, transferred the KRMS broadcast license directly to the Mahaffeys as individuals.[14] They would soon fold the station into Mahaffey Enterprises, Inc.[15]

In September 1997, license holder Mahaffey Enterprises, Inc. reached an agreement to sell KRMS to Viper Communications, Inc. The deal gained FCC approval on October 30, 1997, and the transaction was consummated on November 13, 1997.[16] As of August 2010, Viper Communications remains the owner and operator of KRMS.

Construction permit[edit]

KRMS has been granted an FCC construction permit to relocate the tower used during the day and decrease day power to 840 watts.

Former on-air personalities[edit]

In April 2006, KRMS hired David Lenihan, a talk host then-recently fired from St. Louis station KTRS after describing U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on-air using a racial epithet. Lenihan apologized and KRMS gave Lenihan a two-week tryout with discussions about permanent employment.[17][18]

Jerry Adams, a KRMS radio host and star of the regional television show Jerry Adams Outdoors, died in August 2010 after a brief illness.[19] On his show, Adams and a guest would go fishing or hunting at sites across the Midwest.

Translator[edit]

In addition to its primary transmitter, KRMS uses a broadcast translator to extend or improve its signal coverage area.

Call sign Frequency
MHz
City of license ERP
W
Height
m (ft)
Class FCC info
K248BP 97.5 Osage Beach, Missouri 150 152 m (499 ft) D FCC

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Directory of AM and FM Stations of the United States". 1953 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1953. p. 188. 
  2. ^ "Station Information Profile". Arbitron. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Schedule". KRMS News-Talk 1150. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Call Sign History". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Directory of AM and FM Stations and Market Data for the United States". 1955 Broadcasting Yearbook-Marketbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1955. p. 194. 
  6. ^ a b "Directory of AM and FM Stations and Market Data for the United States". 1956 Broadcasting Yearbook-Marketbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1956. p. 191. 
  7. ^ "Directory of AM and FM Radio Stations in the U.S.". 1958 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1958. p. A-314. 
  8. ^ a b "The Facilities of Broadcasting". 1960 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1960. p. A-181. 
  9. ^ "Directory of Radio Stations in the United States and Canada". Broadcasting Yearbook 1976. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1976. p. C-115. 
  10. ^ "The Facilities of Radio". 1979 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1979. p. C-129. 
  11. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19791031GX)". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database. January 10, 1980. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19860417FN)". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database. June 11, 1986. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  13. ^ Koenig, Robert L. (May 21, 1988). "Taking Stock: Danforth Among Richest in Senator's Disclosures". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. p. 18. "[...]an interest of $5000 to $15000 in radio stations KRMS and KYLC in Osage Beach, Mo." 
  14. ^ "Application Search Details (BTC-19900221ED)". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database. April 2, 1990. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  15. ^ Carnahan, Robin. "Business Name History". Missouri Secretary of State. Retrieved August 25, 2010. 
  16. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19970905EB)". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database. November 13, 1997. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  17. ^ "Fired Radio Show Host Back on the Air". Associated Press. April 26, 2006. 
  18. ^ "Fired radio show host back on the air". WIS-TV. April 26, 2006. 
  19. ^ "Outdoors digest: Fishing show host dies". Kansas City Star. August 14, 2010. 

External links[edit]