Princess Resurrection

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Princess Resurrection
Kaibutsucover1.jpg
North American cover of the first manga volume
怪物王女
(Kaibutsu Ōjo)
Genre Horror comedy
Manga
Written by Yasunori Mitsunaga
Published by Kodansha
English publisher
Demographic Shōnen
Magazine Monthly Shōnen Sirius
Original run July 2005April 2013[1]
Volumes 20
Anime television series
Directed by Masayuki Sakoi
Music by Mikiya Katakura
Studio Madhouse
Licensed by
Network TBS BS-i, CBC, KBS Kyoto
English network
Original run 13 April 200728 September 2007
Episodes 26 (24 + 2 extra episodes) (List of episodes)
Original video animation
Directed by Keiichiro Kawaguchi
Written by Yasunori Mitsunaga
Music by Makoto Takou
Studio Tatsunoko Production
Released 9 December 20107 October 2011
Episodes 3
Portal icon Anime and Manga portal

Princess Resurrection (怪物王女 Kaibutsu Ōjo?, lit., Monster Princess) is a Japanese horror comedy manga by Yasunori Mitsunaga. The manga was serialized monthly in Monthly Shōnen Sirius magazine and published by Kodansha.[1] A 26-episode anime series by Madhouse aired on TBS in 2007. Both the manga and anime are available in North America with the manga licensed by Del Rey Manga and the anime licensed by Sentai Filmworks and available on the Anime Network website. A new OVA series has been made by Tatsunoko Production with the first episode released in December 2010, along with the 13th volume of the manga, the second episode for the 14th volume, and the third episode for the 16th volume. A spin-off manga, Naqua-Den, which stars a side character from Princess Resurrection as the main character, was released in 2012 currently with two volumes.

Plot[edit]

Hiro Hiyorimi is a boy who has just moved to the Sasanaki City to meet his sister. While walking down the sidewalk, he is suddenly hit by a car (crushed by construction beams in the anime). On the verge of death, he is seen by a young woman. She then resurrects him, leaving him alive in the hospital (morgue). He wakes up confused over what happened, only to encounter the woman again as she eliminates some wolf creatures. She addresses Hiro as "her servant" and introduces herself as "Hime" (Japanese for Princess) and explains that she is a member of the royal family of the Monster Realm.

All members of the royal family are endowed with the power to turn a dead body into an immortal warrior that will serve and protect them;

Hiro is now Hime's semi-immortal warrior, but she herself is not immortal yet (which is why she needs help from warriors). The story then follows Hiro as he assists Hime in killing creatures that have been sent by her siblings to attack her in the competition for the Monster Kingdom's throne.

Hime has another servant named Flandre. Later on in the story they encounter Hime's younger sister Sherwood, Sherwood has an android named Francisca. They also encounter a vampire named Reiri and a werewolf named Liza.

Media[edit]

Manga[edit]

Originally released in Japanese by Kodansha, Princess Resurrection has been released in English by Del Rey Manga, in French by Pika Edition,[2] and in German by Egmont.[3]

Volume list[edit]

No. Original release date Original ISBN English release date English ISBN
01 23 January 2006[4] ISBN 978-4-06-373010-4 1 May 2007[5] ISBN 978-0-345-49664-5
02 23 May 2006[6] ISBN 978-4-06-373025-8 28 August 2007[5] ISBN 978-0-345-49682-9
03 22 December 2006[7] ISBN 978-4-06-373048-7 8 April 2008[5] ISBN 978-0-345-50140-0
04 6 April 2007[8] ISBN 978-4-06-373068-5 26 August 2008[5] ISBN 978-0-345-50667-2
05 23 August 2007[9] ISBN 978-4-06-373079-1 27 January 2009[5] ISBN 978-0-345-50668-9
06 21 December 2007[10] ISBN 978-4-06-373096-8 19 May 2009[5] ISBN 978-0-345-50806-5
07 23 May 2008[11] ISBN 978-4-06-373118-7 24 November 2009[5] ISBN 978-0-345-51428-8
08 21 November 2008[12] ISBN 978-4-06-373143-9
09 22 May 2009[13] ISBN 978-4-06-373173-6
10 20 November 2009[14] ISBN 978-4-06-373194-1
11 23 February 2010[15] ISBN 978-4-06-376207-5
12 9 July 2010[16] ISBN 978-4-06-376223-5
13 9 December 2010[17] ISBN 978-4-06-376245-7
14 9 March 2011[18] ISBN 978-4-06-376258-7
15 9 June 2011[19] ISBN 978-4-06-376270-9
16 7 October 2011[20] ISBN 978-4-06-376299-0
17 9 February 2012[21] ISBN 978-4-06-376319-5
18 8 June 2012[22] ISBN 978-4-06-376345-4
19 9 November 2012[23] ISBN 978-4-06-376365-2
20 9 April 2013[24] ISBN 978-4-06-376391-1

Anime[edit]

A 26-episode anime directed by Masayuki Sakoi and Madhouse aired on TBS, BS-i, KBS Kyoto and its affiliated TV networks from 12 April 2007 to 28 September 2007.[25] Unlike the manga, the anime is less violent and the gore has been toned down. The Opening Theme song was "BLOOD QUEEN" by Aki Misato and the Ending Theme song was "Bow Down and Lick My Feet" (跪いて足をお嘗め, hizamazuite ashi wo oname) by Ali Project. The official soundtrack of the anime series is Princess Resurrection OST - Sympathy for the Belonephobia, which was released on 3 October 2007.

Original Sound Track[edit]

Princess Resurrection OST - Sympathy for the Belonephobia is the official soundtrack of the anime television series Princess Resurrection, was released on 3 October 2007.[26]

Track list[edit]

Note: Most part of the list is written in Romaji.

  1. Oumagakoi (Bloody Baptisma)
  2. Suspandu Otome
  3. Jigoku no Kyuuketsu Parade
  4. Chinure Yajuu Bukyoku
  5. Saturnus no Sangeki
  6. Butou Kumo Midnight
  7. Insomnia no Yume Guilliotine
  8. Outeki Ketsuzoku (vocal)
  9. Bokusatsu Rock
  10. Houmagakoi (Hieronymusic Vibration)
  11. Beronephobia ni Sasageru Ballad
  12. Mikadzuki no Kaibutsu Teien
  13. Tokeijikake no Seibozou
  14. Hakai Conductor
  15. Igyou no Sadame
  16. Kichiku Odoru Fukaki Mori
  17. Beronephobia no Bansankai
  18. Rouzaiku no Ragtime
  19. Hisamadzuite Ashi wo Oname (Strings Arranged)
  20. Oumagakoi (vocal)
  21. Kizuguchi ni Hasami wo Tatete
  22. Saraba Itoshiki Chainsaw
  23. Owari naki Sousoukyoku
  24. Tenshi Ronsha no Serenade
  25. Tou Hikari, Aru wa Sono Hoteri
  26. Kakusei Beronephobia
  27. 666 Banme no Genzai
  28. Shukumei ni Aragaishi Mono
  29. Zenmetsu Hakaba Yori Ai wo Komete
  30. BLOOD QUEEN (TV SIZE) / Misato Aki
  31. Hisamadzuite Ashi wo Oname (TV Size)

Reception[edit]

In Jason Thompson's online appendix to Manga: The Complete Guide, he describes the series' plot as being "fun and fast-paced", with "imaginative" action scenes. He also appreciated the manga's references to "classic movie monsters".[27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Princess Resurrection Manga to End in February". Anime News Network. 24 January 2013. Retrieved 2 April 2013. 
  2. ^ "Princesse Résurrection 12". Pika Edition (in French). Retrieved 24 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  3. ^ "Princess Resurrection". Manganet (in German). Egmont. Retrieved 24 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  4. ^ 怪物王女(1) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Release dates established by comparing the results of Google Book Search to those of Amazon.com
  6. ^ 怪物王女(2) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  7. ^ 怪物王女(3) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  8. ^ 怪物王女(4) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  9. ^ 怪物王女(5) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  10. ^ 怪物王女(6) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  11. ^ 怪物王女(7) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  12. ^ 怪物王女(8) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  13. ^ 怪物王女(9) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  14. ^ 怪物王女(10) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  15. ^ 怪物王女(11) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  16. ^ 怪物王女(12) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  17. ^ 怪物王女(13) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  18. ^ 怪物王女(14) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  19. ^ 怪物王女(15) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  20. ^ 怪物王女(16) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  21. ^ 怪物王女(17) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  22. ^ 怪物王女(18) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 23 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  23. ^ 怪物王女(19) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 2 April 2013.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  24. ^ 怪物王女(20) <完> (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved 15 April 2013.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  25. ^ "TVアニメーション「怪物王女」公式ホームページ" (in Japanese). Tokyo Broadcasting System Television, Inc. Retrieved 24 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  26. ^ "TVアニメ『怪物王女』 Sympathy for the Belonephobia". MellowHead (in Japanese). Lantis. Retrieved 24 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  27. ^ Thompson, Jason (28 September 2009). "365 Days of Manga, Day 13: Princess Resurrection". Suduvu. Random House, Inc. Retrieved 24 August 2012.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]