Kaidai-class submarine

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Class overview
Name: Kaidai type submarines
Kaidai I (I-51 class)
Kaidai II (I-152 class)
Kaidai IIIa (I-153 class)
Kaidai IIIb (I-156 class)
Kaidai IV (I-61/I-162 class)
Kaidai V (I-165 class)
Kaidai VIa (I-168 class)
Kaidai VIb (I-174 class)
Kaidai VII (I-176 class)
Builders: Kure Naval Arsenal
Sasebo Naval Arsenal
Yokosuka Naval Arsenal
Kawasaki Shipbuilding
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
Operators: Naval Ensign of Japan.svg Imperial Japanese Navy
Built: 1921-1943
In commission: 1924-1945

The Kaidai (海大型?) was a type of 1st class submarine operated by the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) before and during World War II. The type name, was shortened to ''Navy Large Type Submarine (軍式大型潜水艦 Kaigun-shiki Ōgata Sensuikan?). All Kaidai class submarines originally had a two digit boat name, from I-51 onwards. On 20 May 1942, all Kaidai submarines added a '1' to their name. For example, I-52 became I-152. Ships are listed by the three digit boat name if they had one, two digit if they were not granted one or left service before 20 May 1942.

Class variants[edit]

Kaidais were divided into seven types and two sub-types; Kaidai I - VII

Kaidai I (I-51 class)[edit]

I-51 in 1924

Project number S22. The prototype for the class. The sole Kaidai I, I-51, was based on World War I-era German submarines. She was completed in 1924, refitted with new engines in 1932 and scrapped in 1941. I-51 never saw combat.[1]

  • Boat in class
Boat Builder Laid down Launched Completed Fate
I-51 [2]
(ex-Submarine No. 44)
Kure Naval Arsenal 6 April 1921 29 November 1921 20 June 1924 as Submarine No. 44 Renamed I-51 on 1 November 1924. Decommissioned on 1 April 1940

Kaidai II (I-152 class)[edit]

I-152

Project number S25. There was only 1 Kaidai II, I-152 planned under the Eight-six fleet together with the I-51. She was completed in 1924, used as a training vessel until mid-1942, then struck from service. She was scrapped in 1946.

  • Boat in class
Boat Builder Laid down Launched Completed Fate
I-152
(ex-I-52)
(ex-Submarine No. 51)
Kure Naval Arsenal 14 February 1922 as Submarine No. 51 12 June 1923 20 May 1925 as I-52 Renamed I-52 on 1 November 1924, decommissioned on 1 August 1942, scrapped post-war
Submarine No. 64 Kure Naval Arsenal Re-planned to Kaidai IIIa

Kaidai IIIa/b (I-153 class and I-156 class)[edit]

I-158 in 1927

Project number S26 (Kaidai IIIa) and S27 (Kaidai IIIb). The nine Kaidai IIIs were based on earlier designs, but featured a strengthened hull. The "IIIb" types were 40 cm longer and had a different bow design. All nine boats were constructed between 1927 and 1930.[3]

Of the nine Kaidai IIIs, seven survived the war, as they spent much of their time as training vessels. These were scuttled or scrapped shortly after the end of World War II. I-63 was sunk in a collision with I-60 in 1939, the former losing all her crew. I-63 was refloated and scrapped in 1940. I-60 was later sunk by HMS Jupiter.[3]

  • Boats in classes
Boat Sub type Builder Laid down Launched Completed Results Fate
I-153
(ex-I-53)
(ex-Submarine No. 64)
Kaidai IIIa Kure Naval Arsenal 1 April 1924 as Submarine No. 64 5 August 1925 as I-53 30 March 1927 Renamed I-53 on 1 November 1924. Sank Dutch merchant ship Mösi on 27 February 1942
Sank RMS City of Manchester on 28 February 1942
Sank unknown merchant vessel on 27 February 1942
Decommissioned on 20 November 1945, scrapped in 1948
I-154
(ex-I-54)
Kaidai IIIa Sasebo Naval Arsenal 15 November 1924 15 March 1926 15 December 1927 Sank Dutch merchant ship Majokaat on 2 March 1942 Decommissioned on 20 November 1945, disposed of at Iyo-nada in May 1946
I-155
(ex-I-55)
Kaidai IIIa Kure Naval Arsenal 1 April 1924 2 September 1925 5 September 1927 Sank Dutch merchant-man Van Lansberge on 4 February 1942
Sank Dutch merchant ship Van Cloon on 7 February 1942
Sank RMS Derrymore on 14 February 1942
Sank Norwegian merchant vessel Madrono on 18 February 1942
Decommissioned on 20 November 1945, disposed of at Iyo-nada in May 1946
I-156
(ex-I-56)
Kaidai IIIb Kure Naval Arsenal 3 November 1926 23 March 1928 31 March 1929 Sank Greek merchant ship Hydra II or Norwegian merchant ship Hai Tung on 11 December 1941
Sank RMS Kuantan on 5 January 1942
Damaged Dutch merchant ship Tanimbar on 6 January 1942
Sank Dutch merchantman Van Rees on 8 January 1942
Sank Dutch merchant ship Van Riebeeck on 8 January 1942
Damaged Dutch merchant ship Patras on 13 January 1942
Sank Dutch merchant ship Togian on 4 February 1942
Decommissioned 30 November 1945, sunk as a target off the Gotō Islands on 1 April 1946
I-157
(ex-I-57)
Kaidai IIIb Kure Naval Arsenal 8 July 1927 1 October 1928 24 December 1929 Sank Dutch merchant ship Djirak on 7 January 1942 Decommissioned 30 November 1945, sunk as a target off the Gotō Islands on 1 April 1946
I-158
(ex-I-58)
Kaidai IIIa Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 3 December 1924 3 October 1925 15 May 1928 Sank Dutch merchant ship Langkoas on 3 January 1942
Sank Dutch merchant ship Camphuys on 9 January 1942
Sank Dutch merchant vessel Pijnacker Hordijk on 22 February 1942
Sank Dutch merchant ship Boeroe on 25 February 1942
torpedoed but did not sink RMS British Judge on 28 February 1942
Decommissioned on 30 November 1945, sunk as a target off the Gotō Islands on 1 April 1946
I-159
(ex-I-59)
Kaidai IIIb Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 25 March 1927 25 March 1929 31 March 1930 Sank Norwegian merchant ship Eidsvold on 20 January 1942
Sank unknown merchantman 25 January 1942
Sank Dutch merchant ship KPM Rooseboom on 1 March 1942
Decommissioned on 30 November 1945, sunk as a target off the Gotō Islands on 1 April 1946
I-60 Kaidai IIIb Sasebo Naval Arsenal 10 October 1927 24 April 1929 20 December 1929 Sunk by HMS Jupiter in the Sunda Strait 06°00′S 105°00′E / 6.000°S 105.000°E / -6.000; 105.000 on 17 January 1942[4]
I-63 Kaidai IIIb Sasebo Naval Arsenal 12 August 1926 28 September 1927 20 December 1928 Lost in an accident in the Bungo Channel on 20 February 1939. Salvaged and scrapped on 21 January 1940

Kaidai IV (I-61/162 class)[edit]

I-164 in 1930

Project number S28. Slightly smaller than her predecessors and with only four torpedo tubes, three Kaidai IVs were constructed between 1929 and 1930; I-61, I-162, and I-164. I-61 was lost in a collision in 1941. I-164 was sunk by USS Triton on 17 May 1942. I-162 survived the war.[5]

  • Boats in class


Boat Builder Laid down;
Launched;
Completed
Results Fate
I-61 Mitsubishi, Kōbe Shipyard 15 November 1926;
12 November 1927;
6 April 1929
Lost in an accident on 2 October 1941 in the Iki Channel. Raised and scrapped in 1942
I-162
(ex-I-62)
Mitsubishi, Kōbe Shipyard 20 April 1927;
29 November 1928;
24 March 1930
• Damaged RMS Longwood 31 January 1942
• Damaged RMS Spondilus on 4 February 1942
• Sank RMS Lakshmi Govinda on 10 March 1942
• Sank Dutch merchant ship Merkus on 16 March 1942
• Damaged RMS San Cirilo on 21 March 1942
• Sank unknown merchant ship on 22 March 1942
• Sank Soviet merchant ship Mikoyan on 3 October 1942
• Sank RMS Manon on 7 October 1942
• Damaged RMS Martaban on 13 October 1942
• Sank RMS Fort McCloud on 3 March 1944
Decommissioned 30 November 1945, sunk as a target off the Gotō Islands on 1 April 1946
I-164
(ex-I-64)
Kure Naval Arsenal 28 March 1928;
5 October 1929;
30 August 1930
• Sank Dutch merchant vessel Van Overstraten on 22 January 1942
• Damaged RMS Idar on 28 January 1942
• Sank SS Florence Luckenbach on 29 January 1942
• Sank Indian merchant ship Jalatarang on 30 January 1942
• Sank Indian merchant ship Jalapalaka on 31 January 1942
• Sank Norwegian merchant ship Mabella on 13 March 1942
Sunk by USS Triton south of Kyūshū 29°25′N 134°09′E / 29.417°N 134.150°E / 29.417; 134.150 on 17 May 1942

Kaidai V (I-165 class)[edit]

Japanese submarine I-165 in 1932.jpg
I-65 in 1932
Class overview
Built: 1929-1932
In commission: 1932-1945
Completed: 3
Lost: 3
General characteristics
Displacement: 1,575 long tons (1,600 t) surfaced
2,330 long tons (2,367 t) submerged
Length: 97.70 m (320 ft 6 in)
Beam: 8.20 m (26 ft 11 in)
Draught: 4.70 m (15 ft 5 in)
Propulsion: 2 × Sulzer Mk.3 diesels 2 shafts 6,000 bhp
1,800 shp
Speed: 20.5 knots (38.0 km/h) surfaced
8.2 kn (15.2 km/h) submerged
Range:

10,000 nmi (19,000 km) at 10 kn (19 km/h) surfaced

60 nmi (110 km) at 3 kn (5.6 km/h) submerged
Test depth: 75.0 m (246.1 ft)
Complement: 62
Armament:

• 6 × 533 mm (21 in) torpedo tubes (4 × bow, 2 × aft) • 14 × Type 89 torpedoes • 1 × 100 mm (3.9 in) L/50 Type 88 AA gun • 1 × 12.7 mm AA gun

• 1 × 7.7 mm MG
Notes: 230 tons fuel

Project number S29. Three Kaidai Vs were constructed; I-165, I-166, and I-67 which were all completed in 1932. The design saw the upgrade of the deck weapon from a 50 cal to a 65 cal dual-purpose gun. The submarine was also slightly wider and taller, with an increased crew complement of 75 and an increased maximum depth of 230 ft (70 m). I-165 was modified in 1945, her gun removed and two Kaiten midget submarines/manned torpedoes substituted.[6]

None of the Kaidai Vs survived World War II. I-67 was lost with all 87 crew during an exercise in 1940. I-165 was sunk on 27 June 1945, off the east coast of Saipan. I-166 was sunk by the British submarine HMS Telemachus on 17 July 1944, off the coast of Singapore.[6]

Boat Builder Laid down Launched Completed Results Fate
I-165
(ex-I-65)
Kure Naval Arsenal 19 December 1929 2 June 1931 1 December 1932 • Sank Dutch merchant ship Benkoelen on 9 January 1942
• Sank Indian merchant ship Jalarajan on 15 January 1942
• Sank Netherlands merchant Johanne Justesen on 15 February 1942
• Sank RMS Bhima on 20 February 1942
• Sank SS Harmonides on 25 August 1942
• Sank USS Losmar on 24 September 1942
• Sank RMS Perseus on 16 January 1944
• Sank SS Nancy Moller on 18 March 1944
Converted to the Kaiten mother ship in 1945, sunk by USN patrol bomber in the Mariana Islands 15°28′N 153°39′E / 15.467°N 153.650°E / 15.467; 153.650 on 27 June 1945
I-166
(ex-I-66)
Sasebo Naval Arsenal 8 November 1929 2 June 1931 10 November 1932 • Sank Dutch submarine K XVI on 25 December 1941
• Sank USS Liberty Glo on 11 January 1942
• Sank Panamanian merchantman Nord 21 January 1942
• Sank RMS Chak Sang on 22 January 1942
• Sank RMS Kamuning 14 February 1942
• Sank Panamanian merchantman Camila on 1 October 1942
• Sank RMS Cranfield on 22 November 1942
Sunk by HMS Telemachus on 17 July 1945
I-67 Mitsubishi, Kōbe Shipyard 8 November 1929 2 June 1931 10 November 1932 Lost in an accident at Minami Torishima on 29 August 1940

Kaidai VIa/b (I-168 class and I-174 class)[edit]

I-68/I-168 in 1934

Project number S31 (Kaidai VIa) and S34 (Kaidai VIb). They were built in 1931-34 under the Maru 1 Programme and the Maru 2 Programme. Constructed between 1934 and 1938, eight Kaidai VIs were built; I-168, I-169, I-70, I-171, I-172, I-73, I-174, and I-175. At 23 knots, this type had the fastest surface speed for any submarine at the time of construction, although the speed was bettered slightly by later Japanese submarines. I-174 and I-175 were of the Kaidai VIb sub-type. They were 30 cm longer, 25 tons heavier, and equipped with a 50 cal deck weapon instead of a 65 cal.[7]

Kaidai VIs contributed to the sinking of two American aircraft carriers during World War II. The destruction of these submarines also hold some milestones; I-70 was Japan's first major warship casualty in World War II, and the sinking of I-73 represented the first warship kill by a United States Navy submarine in the war.[7]

  • Boats in classes
Boat Sub types Builder Laid down Launched Completed Results Fate
I-168
(ex-I-68)
Kaidai VIa
(Earlier batch)
Kure Naval Arsenal 18 June 1931 26 June 1933 31 July 1934 Sank USS Hammann (DD-412) on 6 June 1942
Sank USS Yorktown (CV-5) on 7 June 1942
Sunk by USS Scamp at north of Rabaul 27 July 1943
I-169
(ex-I-69)
Kaidai VIa
(Earlier batch)
Mitsubishi, Kōbe Shipyard 22 December 1932 15 February 1934 28 September 1935 Sank Dutch merchantman Tjinegara 21 July 1942 Sunk by air raid at Truk on 4 April 1944
I-70 Kaidai VIa
(Earlier batch)
Sasebo Naval Arsenal 25 January 1933 14 June 1934 9 November 1935 Sunk by aircraft from USS Enterprise in the Hawaiian Islands on 10 December 1941
I-171
(ex-I-71)
Kaidai VIa
(Latter batch)
Kawasaki, Kōbe Shipyard 15 February 1933 25 August 1934 24 December 1935 Sank USS General Royal T. Frank on 19 January 1942 Sunk by USS Guest and USS Hudson west of Buka Island on 30 January 1944
I-172
(ex-I-72)
Kaidai VIa
(Latter batch)
Mitsubishi, Kōbe Shipyard 16 December 1933 6 April 1935 7 January 1937 Sank USS Prusa on 19 December 1941
Sank the oiler USS Neches on 23 January 1942
Sunk by USS Southard at San Cristobal 10 November 1942
I-73 Kaidai VIa
(Latter batch)
Kawasaki, Kōbe Shipyard 5 September 1933 20 June 1935 7 January 1937 (1). Sunk by USS Gudgeon at Midway Atoll 28°24′N 178°35′E / 28.400°N 178.583°E / 28.400; 178.583 on 27 January 1942
(2). Sunk by USS Long, USS Jarvis and USS Trever at Pearl Harbor on 29 January 1942
I-174
(ex-I-74)
Kaidai VIb Sasebo Naval Arsenal 16 October 1934 28 March 1937 15 August 1938 Sank US Army transport Portmar on 16 June 1943 and damaged USS LST-469 in an attack on Convoy GP55 on 16 June 1943 Sunk by a United States Navy B-24 Liberator patrol aircraft near Truk on 12 April 1944
I-175
(ex-I-75)
Kaidai VIb Mitsubishi, Kōbe Shipyard 1 November 1934 16 September 1936 18 December 1938 Sank USS Manini 18 December 1941
Damaged Australian merchant ship Allara on 23 July 1942
Sank Australian merchant ship Murada on 24 July 1942
Sank French merchant vessel Cagou on 28 July 1942
Sank RMS Dranker on 3 August 1942
Sank USS Liscome Bay on 24 November 1943
Sunk by USS Nicholas northeast of Wotje Atoll on 17 February 1944

Kaidai VII (I-176 class)[edit]

I-176.jpg
I-176 in 1942
Class overview
Built: 1939-1943
In commission: 1942-1944
Planned: 10
Lost: 10
General characteristics
Displacement: 1,630 long tons (1,656 t) surfaced
2,602 long tons (2,644 t) submerged
Length: 105.50 m (346 ft 2 in)
Beam: 8.25 m (27 ft 1 in)
Draft: 4.60 m (15 ft 1 in)
Propulsion: 2 × Kampon Mk 1B Model 8 diesels, 2 shafts, 8,000 bhp
1,800 shp
Speed: 23.1 kn (42.8 km/h) surfaced
8.0 kn (14.8 km/h) submerged
Range:

8,000 nmi (15,000 km) at 16 kn (30 km/h) surfaced

50 nmi (93 km) at 5 kn (9.3 km/h) submerged
Test depth: 80 m (260 ft)
Complement: 86
Armament: • 6 × 533 mm (21 in) TTs
(6 × bow)
• 12 × Type 95 torpedoes
• 1 × 120 mm (4.7 in) L/40 11th Year Type Naval gun
• 2 × Type 96 25mm AA guns
Notes: 354.7 tons fuel


Project number S41. The final design in the Kaidai class, ten Kaidai VIIs were ordered in 1939 (I-176 I-185), and were completed over the course of 1942 and 1943.[8] They were built in 1939 under the Maru 4 Programme. The IJN called New Kaidai (新海大型 Shin Kaidai-gata?) unofficially, and intended to replace this type with Kaidai III and Kaidai IV. Instead of possessing some aft-firing torpedo tubes as all other predecessors did, the Kaidai VII's six tubes all faced forward. They had an endurance of 75 days.[9]

Seven of the ten Kaidai VIIs were sunk within their first year of operation and all ten vessels were sunk by October 1944.[9]

Boat No. Boat Builder Laid down Launched Completed Results Fate
154 I-176
(ex-I-76)
Kure Naval Arsenal 22 June 1940 as I-76 7 June 1941 4 August 1942 as I-176 Damaged USS Chester on 20 October 1942
Sank USS Corvina on 17 November 1943
Sunk by USS Franks and USS Haggard northwest of Buka Island on 17 May 1944.
155 I-177
(ex-I-77)
Kawasaki, Kōbe Shipyard 10 March 1941 as I-77 20 December 1941 28 December 1942 as I-177 Sank RMS Limerick on 26 April 1943
Sank AHS Centaur on 14 May 1943
Sunk by USS Steele and USS Samuel S. Miles northwest of Palau on 3 October 1944
156 I-178
(ex-I-78)
Mitsubishi, Kōbe Shipyard 21 May 1941 as I-78 24 February 1942 26 December 1942 as I-178 Sank Liberty ship Lydia M. Child on 27 April 1943 Lost sometime after 17 June 1943 during a patrol off eastern Australia. Cause of loss not known, but some sources state that she was sunk by Royal Australian Air Force aircraft.[10]
157 I-179
(ex-I-79)
Kawasaki, Kōbe Shipyard 21 August 1941 as I-79 16 July 1942 as I-179 8 June 1943 Lost in an accident at Iyo Nada on 9 July 1943
158 I-180
(ex-I-80)
Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 17 April 1941 as I-80 7 February 1942 as I-180 15 January 1943 Sank Australian merchant ship Wollongbar on 29 April 1943
Sank Norwegian merchant ship Fingal 5 May 1943
Damaged Australian merchant vessel Ormiston on 12 May 1943
Damaged Australian merchant-man Caradale on 12 May 1943
Sunk by USS Gilmore at Dutch Harbor 55°10′N 155°40′W / 55.167°N 155.667°W / 55.167; -155.667 on 27 April 1944
159 I-181 Kure Naval Arsenal 11 November 1941 2 May 1942 25 May 1943 (1). Sunk by USN destroyer and patrol torpedo boat in New Guinea on 16 January 1944
(2). Sunk by USN carrier aircraft in the Saint George's Channel on 16 January 1944
160 I-182 Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 10 November 1941 20 May 1942 10 May 1943 (1). Sunk by USS Wadsworth at Espiritu Santo on 1 September 1943
(2). Sunk by USS Ellet in the New Hebrides on 3 September 1943
161 I-183 Kawasaki, Kōbe Shipyard 26 December 1941 21 January 1943 3 October 1943 Sunk by USS Pogy south of Shikoku on 28 April 1944
162 I-184 Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 1 April 1942 12 December 1942 15 October 1943 Sunk by aircraft from USS Suwannee southeast of Saipan on 19 June 1944
163 I-185 Yokosuka Naval Arsenal 9 February 1942 16 September 1942 23 September 1943 Sunk by USS Newcomb and USS Chandler northwest of Saipan on 22 June 1944

Characteristics[edit]

Type Kaidai I (I-51) Kaidai II (I-152) Kaidai IIIa (I-153) Kaidai IIIb (I-156) Kaidai IV (I-61)
Displacement Surfaced 1,390 long tons (1,412 t) 1,390 long tons (1,412 t) 1,635 long tons (1,661 t) 1,635 long tons (1,661 t) 1,575 long tons (1,600 t)
Submerged 2,430 long tons (2,469 t) 2,500 long tons (2,540 t) 2,300 long tons (2,337 t) 2,300 long tons (2,337 t) 2,300 long tons (2,337 t)
Length (overall) 91.44 m (300 ft 0 in) 100.85 m (330 ft 10 in) 100.58 m (330 ft 0 in) 101.00 m (331 ft 4 in) 97.70 m (320 ft 6 in)
Beam 8.81 m (28 ft 11 in) 7.64 m (25 ft 1 in) 7.98 m (26 ft 2 in) 7.90 m (25 ft 11 in) 7.80 m (25 ft 7 in)
Draft 4.60 m (15 ft 1 in) 5.14 m (16 ft 10 in) 4.83 m (15 ft 10 in) 4.90 m (16 ft 1 in) 4.83 m (15 ft 10 in)
Depth 6.02 m (19 ft 9 in) 6.71 m (22 ft 0 in) 6.71 m (22 ft 0 in) 6.70 m (22 ft 0 in) 6.70 m (22 ft 0 in)
Power plant and shaft 4 × Sulzer Mk.2 diesels
4 shafts
2 × Sulzer Mk 3 diesels
2 shafts
2 × Sulzer Mk 3 diesels
2 shafts
2 × Sulzer Mk 3 diesels
2 shafts
2 × Rauschenbach Mk 2 diesels
2 shafts
Power Surfaced 5,200 bhp 6,800 bhp 6,800 bhp 6,800 bhp 6,000 bhp
Submerged 2,000 shp 1,800 shp 1,800 shp 1,800 shp 1,800 shp
Speed Surfaced 18.4 knots (34.1 km/h) 20.1 knots (37.2 km/h) 20.0 knots (37.0 km/h) 20.0 knots (37.0 km/h) 20.0 knots (37.0 km/h)
Submerged 8.4 knots (15.6 km/h) 7.7 knots (14.3 km/h) 8.0 knots (14.8 km/h) 8.0 knots (14.8 km/h) 8.5 knots (15.7 km/h)
Range Surfaced 20,000 nmi (37,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) 10,000 nmi (19,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) 10,000 nmi (19,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) 10,000 nmi (19,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) 10,000 nmi (19,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h)
Submerged 100 nmi (190 km) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h) 100 nmi (190 km) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h) 90 nmi (170 km) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h) 60 nmi (110 km) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h) 60 nmi (110 km) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h)
Test depth 45.7 m (150 ft) 45.7 m (150 ft) 60.0 m (196.9 ft) 60.0 m (196.9 ft) 60.0 m (196.9 ft)
Fuel 508 tons 284.5 tons 241.8 tons 230 tons 230 tons
Complement 70 58 63 63 58
Armament (initial) • 8 × 533 mm (21 in) TTs
(6 × bow, 2 × aft)
• 24 × 6th Year Type torpedoes
• 1 × 120 mm (4.7 in) L/45 3rd Year Type Naval gun
• 8 × 533 mm (21 in) TTs
(6 × bow, 2 × aft)
• 16 × 6th Year Type torpedoes
• 1 × 120 mm (4.7 in) L/45 3rd Year Type Naval gun
• 1 × 76.2 mm (3.00 in) L/23.5 AA gun
• 8 × 533 mm (21 in) TTs
(6 × bow, 2 × aft)
• 16 × 6th Year Type torpedoes
• 1 × 120 mm (4.7 in) L/40 11th Year Type Naval gun
• 1 × 7.7 mm MG
same as Kaidai IIIa • 6 × 533 mm (21 in) TTs
(4 × bow, 2 × aft)
• 14 × Type 89 torpedoes
• 1 × 120 mm (4.7 in) L/40 11th Year Type Naval gun
• 1 × 7.7 mm MG
Type Kaidai V (I-165) Kaidai VIa (Earlier batch, I-168) Kaidai VIa (Latter batch, I-171) Kaidai VIb (I-174)
Displacement Surfaced 1,575 long tons (1,600 t) 1,400 long tons (1,422 t) same as Earlier batch 1,420 long tons (1,443 t)
Submerged 2,330 long tons (2,367 t) 2,440 long tons (2,479 t) 2,564 long tons (2,605 t)
Length (overall) 97.70 m (320 ft 6 in) 104.70 m (343 ft 6 in) 105.00 m (344 ft 6 in)
Beam 8.20 m (26 ft 11 in) 8.20 m (26 ft 11 in) 8.20 m (26 ft 11 in)
Draft 4.70 m (15 ft 5 in) 4.58 m (15 ft 0 in) 4.60 m (15 ft 1 in)
Depth 7.05 m (23 ft 2 in) 7.00 m (23 ft 0 in) 7.00 m (23 ft 0 in)
Power plant and shaft 2 × Sulzer Mk.3 diesels
2 shafts
2 × Kampon Mk.1A Model 8 diesels, 2 shafts 2 × Kampon Mk 1A Model 8 diesels, 2 shafts
Power Surfaced 6,000 bhp 9,000 bhp 9,000 bhp
Submerged 1,800 shp 1,800 shp 1,800 shp
Speed Surfaced 20.5 knots (38.0 km/h) 23.0 knots (42.6 km/h) 23.0 knots (42.6 km/h)
Submerged 8.2 knots (15.2 km/h) 8.2 knots (15.2 km/h) 8.2 knots (15.2 km/h)
Range Surfaced 10,000 nmi (19,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) 14,000 nmi (26,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) 10,000 nmi (19,000 km) at 16 knots (30 km/h)
Submerged 60 nmi (110 km) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h) 65 nmi (120 km) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h) 90 nmi (170 km) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h)
Test depth 75.0 m (246.1 ft) 70.0 m (229.7 ft) 85.0 m (278.9 ft)
Fuel 230 tons 341 tons 442 tons
Complement 62 68 68
Armament (initial) • 6 × 533 mm (21 in) TTs
(4 × bow, 2 × aft)
• 14 × Type 89 torpedoes
• 1 × 100 mm (3.9 in) L/50 Type 88 AA gun
• 1 × 12.7 mm AA gun
• 1 × 7.7 mm MG
• 6 × 533 mm (21 in) TTs
(4 × bow, 2 × aft)
• 14 × Type 89 torpedoes
• 1 × 100 mm (3.9 in) L/50 Type 88 AA gun
• 1 × 13.2 mm AA gun
• 1 × 7.7 mm MG
• 6 × 533 mm (21 in) TTs
(4 × bow, 2 × aft)
• 14 × Type 89 torpedoes
• 1 × 120 mm (4.7 in) L/40 11th Year Type Naval gun
• 1 × 13.2 mm AA gun
• 1 × 7.7 mm MG
• 6 × 533 mm (21 in) TTs
(4 × bow, 2 × aft)
• 14 × Type 89 torpedoes
• 1 × 120 mm (4.7 in) L/40 11th Year Type Naval gun
• 1 × 13.2 mm AA gun

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Type KD1". Combinedfleet.com - Imperial Japanese Navy Page. Retrieved 2007-02-20. 
  2. ^ 伊号第51潜水艦 (I-Gō Dai-51 Sensuikan?). The same shall apply hereinafter.
  3. ^ a b "Type KD3". Combinedfleet.com - Imperial Japanese Navy Page. Retrieved 2007-02-20. 
  4. ^ HMS JUPITER (G 85) - J-class Destroyer
  5. ^ "Type KD4". Combinedfleet.com - Imperial Japanese Navy Page. Retrieved 2007-02-20. 
  6. ^ a b "Type KD5". Combinedfleet.com - Imperial Japanese Navy Page. Retrieved 2007-02-20. 
  7. ^ a b "Type KD6". Combinedfleet.com - Imperial Japanese Navy Page. Retrieved 2007-02-20. 
  8. ^ a b Smith (1992) pg. 29
  9. ^ a b c "Type KD7". Combinedfleet.com - Imperial Japanese Navy Page. Retrieved 2007-02-20. 
  10. ^ Hackett, Bob; Kingsepp, Sander (2001). "IJN Submarine I-178: Tabular Record of Movement". combinedfleet.com. Retrieved 29 December 2012. 

References[edit]

  • Smith, A.E. (May 1992) [1991]. Three Minutes of Time - the torpedoing of the Australian Hospital Ship Centaur (Second Printing ed.). Miami: Tasman Press. ISBN 0-646-07631-0. 
  • "Rekishi Gunzō". , Gakken (Japan)
    • History of the Pacific War Vol. 17, I-Gō Submarines, January 1998, ISBN 4-05-601767-0
    • History of the Pacific War Vol. 63, Documents of IJN submarines and USN submarines, January 2008, ISBN 4-05-605004-X
    • History of the Pacific War Extra, Perfect guide, The submarines of the Imperial Japanese Forces, March 2005, ISBN 4-05-603890-2
  • Model Art Extra No.537, Drawings of Imperial Japanese Naval Vessels Part-3, Model Art Co. Ltd. (Japan), May 1999
  • The Maru Special, Ushio Shobō (Japan)
    • Japanese Naval Vessels No. 37, Japanese Submarines II, April 1980
    • Japanese Naval Vessels No. 132, Japanese Submarines I (New edition), February 1988
  • Monthly Ships of the World, "Kaijinsha".  (Japan)
    • No. 469, Special issue Vol. 37, "History of Japanese Submarines", August 1993