Kaillie Humphries

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Kaillie Humphries
Kaillie Humphries at Whistler.JPG
Kaillie Humphries in Vancouver 2010
Personal information
Nationality Canadian
Born (1985-09-04) September 4, 1985 (age 28)[1]
Calgary, Alberta
Residence Calgary, Alberta[1]
Height 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in)[1]
Weight 73 kg (161 lb; 11.5 st)[1]
Sport
Country  Canada
Sport Bobsleigh
Event(s) 2-woman
Coached by Germany Stefan Bosch
Achievements and titles
Olympic finals Gold medal icon.svg Gold medal icon.svg

Kaillie Humphries (née Simundson) (born September 4, 1985) is a Canadian bobsledder. Humphries is the reigning Olympic champion in the two-woman at the 2010 Winter Olympics and the 2014 Winter Olympics. With her victory in 2014 she became the first female bobsledder to successfully defend her Olympic title. Due to her repeat championship she was named flagbearer for the closing ceremonies at the 2014 Games together with brakewoman Heather Moyse. In addition, Humphries is also the two time defending overall World Cup champion. In her career she has won seven FIBT World Championship medals which includes her current title as the reigning two-time World Champion.

Career[edit]

In 2007, Humphries was placed low on the Canadian depth chart and did not feature at the 2006 Winter Olympics. In an effort to compete she considered representing the United Kingdom, the country of her soon-to-be husband. Opting to remain with the Canadian team she gained a spot on the roster after signing up for a bobsleigh driving school.[2] She won the silver medal in the mixed bobsleigh-skeleton team event at the 2008 FIBT World Championships in Altenberg, Germany. Humphries finished the 2009-10 Bobsleigh World Cup second overall with a third place finish on the last stop at Igls.[3]

Humphries then most prominently won a gold medal in the Two-woman competition at the 2010 Winter Olympics with Heather Moyse. The silver medal was won by fellow Canadians Shelley-Ann Brown and Helen Upperton. It marked the first time of the 2010 Olympics that Canadians had won two medals in one event.[4] The win completed a childhood dream for Humphries. After the final run she said that "I don't think I can put it into words yet, we did our job, you know. The goal I set as a little kid, to have done it, is amazing.”[2]

During the next couple of years, Humphries met with limited success on the World Cup tour and in World Championship competition. However, during the 2012 championships in Lake Placid she won her first World Championship gold medal with Jennifer Ciochetti as her brakeman. This was also the first gold for any Canadian woman's sled team at the World Championships. When asked about what her result means on top of her Olympic gold she said that "It feels amazing. It is another goal accomplished. This means a lot to me. I feel like I'm still growing as a pilot and I try to learn from every experience. I have been working on my consistency and I'm glad it showed here."[5] In the team event, Humphries went on to help guide the Canadians to a bronze medal as well, adding to her medal tally that year.[6]

Continued dominance[edit]

Humphries continued to turn heads during the 2012–13 Bobsleigh World Cup season with five straight wins aided by the pushes of new brakeman Chelsea Valois.[7] This success continued as the pair placed first while setting a track record at the 2013 FIBT World Championships in St. Moritz, thus enabling Humphries to successfully defend her title as World Champion. This was also Humphries' twelfth straight podium finish in FIBT events.[8] She locked up the World Cup overall title with a third place finish at the Sliding Center Sanki near Sochi, site of the 2014 Winter Olympics. Humphries responded to press about her runs saying "They weren't the best runs today, I made a few mistakes, but I am still learning. We are going to come back here again next year for international training week and work hard to clean things up."[9]

The 2013-14 World Cup season saw Humphries reunited with her Vancouver 2010 teammate, Heather Moyse. The team of Humphries and Moyse traded podium positions with Elana Meyers and Lauryn Williams at several World Cup events with the Canadian women ultimately succeeding in winning the overall World Cup title. This close contest between the Canadians and Americans carried into the 2014 Sochi Olympics competition. Meyers and Williams led after Day 1 of competition having produced two runs built on track record push starts that uncharacteristically beat out the Canadian team at what was their strong suit. Despite being beaten on the start times, Humphries made fewer driving errors and produced cleaner runs but was still just over two tenths of a second back from the lead time.

On the second day of competition, the Americans again won out on quick starting pushes but made several driving errors on the technical course. Humphries' clean driving propelled the Canadians from second place into the gold medal position, allowing them to become the first female bobsleigh team to repeat as Olympic champions, the first female Canadian Olympians to repeat as champions since Catriona Lemay Doan, and etching their names into Olympic history. Humphries said of the record setting achievement: "How do you describe achieving a dream? This is a four-year goal of ours. This has been something that we've done together. Winning gold is amazing, but walking away satisfied is better. After the third run I knew that if we did the business we could be on top."[10]

Personal[edit]

Humphries has competed since 2004 and currently slides with Heather Moyse as her brakeman.

Career highlights[edit]

Olympic Winter Games
2006 – Turin, Alternate – Push Athlete, Did Not Compete
2010 – Vancouver, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Heather Moyse
2014 – Sochi, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Heather Moyse
FIBT (IBSF) World Cup Overall Season Championship
Third, Bronze medal icon.svg overall in the 2009–10 FIBT World Cup
Third, Bronze medal icon.svg overall in the 2010–11 FIBT World Cup
World Championships
2008 – Altenberg, Silver medal icon.svg 2nd with Combined Team Event
2011 – Winterberg, Bronze medal icon.svg 3rd with Heather Moyse
2011 – Winterberg, Bronze medal icon.svg 3rd with Combined Team Event
2012 – Lake Placid, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Jennifer Ciochetti
2012 – Lake Placid, Bronze medal icon.svg 3rd with Combined Team Event
2013 – St. Moritz, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Chelsea Valois
World Cup Single Events
2007/2008 – Lake Placid, Bronze medal icon.svg 3rd with Heather Moyse
2008/2009 – Whistler, Silver medal icon.svg 2nd with Heather Moyse
2008/2009 – Park City, Silver medal icon.svg 2nd with Shelley-Ann Brown
2009/2010 – Lake Placid, Bronze medal icon.svg 3rd with Combined Team Event
2009/2010 – Lake Placid, Bronze medal icon.svg 3rd with Heather Moyse
2009/2010 – Igls, Bronze medal icon.svg 3rd with Heather Moyse
2009/2010 – Königsee, Silver medal icon.svg 2nd with Heather Moyse
2009/2010 – Königsee, Silver medal icon.svg 2nd with Heather Moyse
2009/2010 – Altenberg, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Heather Moyse
2010/2011 – Whistler, Bronze medal icon.svg 3rd with Heather Hughes
2011/2012 – Königsee, Bronze medal icon.svg 3rd with Combined Team Event
2011/2012 – Königsee, Silver medal icon.svg 2nd with Emily Baadsvik
2011/2012 – La Plagne, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Emily Baadsvik
2011/2012 – Whistler, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Emily Baadsvik
2011/2012 – Calgary, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Jennifer Ciochetti
2012/2013 – Lake Placid, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Chelsea Valois
2012/2013 – Park City, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Chelsea Valois
2012/2013 – Whistler, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Chelsea Valois
2013/2014 – Calgary, Gold medal icon.svg 1st with Heather Moyse
2013/2014 – Park City, Silver medal icon.svg 2nd with Heather Moyse
Europa Cup
2006/2007 – Europa Cup, Gold medal icon.svg Champion
World Junior Championship
2006 – Silver Medalist, Silver medal icon.svg

[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e FIBT-Bobsleigh profile, accessed January 27, 2013
  2. ^ a b Vick Hall (February 25, 2010). "Canada nabs gold, silver in bobsleigh". Canada.com. Retrieved February 15, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Humphries, Moyse hit World Cup bobsleigh podium". CBC News. January 22, 2010. Retrieved January 22, 2010. 
  4. ^ Rutherford, Kristina (February 24, 2010). "Canada finishes 1–2 in women's bobsleigh". CTV Olympics. Retrieved February 24, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Canada's Humphries wins bobsleigh gold". CBC Sports. February 18, 2012. 
  6. ^ Gary Kingston (February 19, 2012). "Gold, silver and bronze for Canada". Vancouver Sun. 
  7. ^ "Calgary's Kaillie Humphries extends historic winning streak". CBC Sports. December 14, 2012. 
  8. ^ Michael Camu (January 26, 2013). "Canada's Kaillie Humphries defends world bobsleigh title". CBC Sports. 
  9. ^ "Kaillie Humphries clinches World Cup bobsled season title". CBC Sports. February 15, 2012. 
  10. ^ Tony Care (February 19, 2014). "Kaillie Humphries, Heather Moyse win bobsled gold". CBC Sports.