Kamerion Wimbley

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Kamerion Wimbley
Kamerion Wimbley.JPG
At a game in Denver in October, 2010.
No. 95     Tennessee Titans
Outside linebacker
Personal information
Date of birth: (1983-10-13) October 13, 1983 (age 31)
Place of birth: Wichita, Kansas
Height: 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) Weight: 258 lb (117 kg)
Career information
High school: Wichita (KS) Northwest
College: Florida State
NFL Draft: 2006 / Round: 1 / Pick: 13
Debuted in 2006 for the Cleveland Browns
Career history
Roster status: Active
Career highlights and awards
  • Second team All-ACC (2005)
Career NFL statistics as of Week 17, 2013
Tackles 410
Sacks 51.5
Interceptions 2
Stats at NFL.com

Kamerion Wimbley (/kəˈmɪəri.ən/ kə-MEER-ee-ən; born October 13, 1983) is an American football outside linebacker for the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft. He played college football at Florida State.

Wimbley has also played for the Oakland Raiders.

Early years[edit]

Attending Wichita Northwest High School in Kansas, Wimbley played defensive end, linebacker, quarterback, receiver and punter. He earned Parade and SuperPrep All-America honors during his senior season and was considered to be one of the top high school athletes in the nation. He participated in the 2002 U.S. Army All-American Bowl.

Considered a four-star recruit by Rivals.com, Wimbley was ranked 58th overall among football prospects of the class of 2002.[1] He selected Florida State over Notre Dame, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Wimbley graduated from Northwest High School in December 2001 (a semester early) and enrolled at Florida State in the spring of 2002.

College career[edit]

At Florida State, Wimbley played in all 14 games including the 2003 Sugar Bowl against Georgia as a true freshman, lining up at defensive end while also earning extensive playing time on special teams throughout the season. Wimbley finished the season as the second leading tackler among all Seminole freshmen with 17 stops, behind only A. J. Nicholson. In the Seminoles win at Georgia Tech in early November, Wimbley recorded six solo tackles.

In his sophomore year, Wimbley was still primarily serving as back-up to Eric Moore. Playing in all 13 games, he recorded 38 tackles (30 solo and eight assisted), 6.5 tackles for lost yardage, 2.5 quarterback sacks, two pass break-ups and seven quarterback hurries. His first career start came against Duke, as he replaced the injured Moore and responded with a career-high tying eight tackles. Wimbley's best game of the season came against Colorado with a career-high eight tackles (four for lost yardage), two sacks, two third down stops, two pass deflections and one forced fumble.

Still only a back-up to Moore at right defensive, Wimbley played in all 12 games as a junior. Only against Syracuse and Virginia he replaced Moore in the starting line-up. Wimbley finished the season with 27 tackles and 7 quarterback hurries. Five of those came in the victory over Wake Forest. He also had a season-high five tackles in Florida State's victory over Clemson.

As a senior, he recorded three multiple sack games and lead the ACC in sacks before suffering a knee injury against NC State. He also led the team in quarterback hurries with 17 and set career-highs in season sacks and tackles for a loss. He returned to the starting lineup for the Orange Bowl against Penn State, his last career game. Despite being injured part of the season, Wimbley was named second team All-ACC and was named All-America by Pro Football Weekly.

Professional career[edit]

2006 NFL Draft[edit]

Although playing 4-3 defensive end at Florida State, Wimbley was considered "not big enough to play there on a consistent basis in the NFL."[2] Rather, he was considered an ideal fit at 3-4 rush linebacker by most NFL scouts.

For their 3-4 defense, the Cleveland Browns were in need of a run-stuffer and a pass rusher. There was discussion the team should pick nose tackle Haloti Ngata, but according to general manager Phil Savage the coaching staff wanted to pressure the quarterback. So the team targeted Wimbley.[3] The Browns selected him with the 13th pick overall in the Draft.

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt 40-yd dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert Broad BP
6 ft 3¾ in 248 lb 4.61 s 1.60 s 2.74 s 4.48 s 6.98 s 38½ in 10 ft 9 in 24 reps
All values from NFL Combine[4]

Cleveland Browns[edit]

On July 22, 2006, he signed a six-year deal with the Browns and includes $9.3 million in guaranteed money and $23.7 million total. After being converted to outside linebacker from his college position of defensive end, he played the entire season as the starting linebacker playing opposite all-time post season sack leader Willie McGinest. During his rookie season, Wimbley made an immediate impact leading the team and all AFC rookies with 11 sacks, to go along with 62 tackles, 1 fumble recovery, and 1 forced fumble. He managed to fly under the radar in his rookie season despite the impressive performance, who was beaten out by 3 other rookie linebackers in consideration for the NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year award.

In his second NFL season, Wimbley failed to live up to the success of his rookie campaign, being part of a Browns defense that struggled throughout the season. However, he still led the team in sacks with 5, and also registered 51 tackles and 4 forced fumbles.

Oakland Raiders[edit]

On March 14, 2010, Wimbley was traded to the Oakland Raiders for a third round pick in 2010 NFL Draft, which was used on Quarterback Colt McCoy of Texas. The Raiders intended to put him at defensive end, hoping it would bring him back to his 2006 (rookie campaign) form. Instead they moved him to strongside linebacker. On August 21, 2010, during a pre-season game against the Chicago Bears, Wimbley recorded 4 sacks in one half on quarterback Jay Cutler. He finished the 2010 regular season with 58 tackles (46 solo), 9 sacks, a pass defended and a forced fumble. Wimbley started all 16 games in his first season with the Raiders. He was released on March 17, 2012.[5]

Tennessee Titans[edit]

Wimbley signed with the Tennessee Titans on March 20, 2012.[6] The deal was for five years and is worth up to $35 million.[7]

During the 2012 season, Wimbley appeared in all 16 games, recording 30 tackles and six sacks.

American Ninja Warrior[edit]

On March 27, 2012 Wimbley participated on G4's American Ninja Warrior South-East Regional Qualifying round. He successfully finished the course with a time of 1:30.87. This time was fast enough to advance him to the Regional Finals. He successfully completed this extended course with a time of 4:25.08. Despite this, his time was not good enough to move on, finishing just one spot off of qualification for the next stage of the competition.

Career statistics[edit]

Year Team G Tackles Sacks TFL INT INT YDS FF FR PD TD
2006 Cleveland 16 62 11 8.5 0 0 1 1 0 0
2007 Cleveland 16 51 5 3 0 0 4 0 1 0
2008 Cleveland 16 66 4 3 1 2 1 0 2 0
2009 Cleveland 15 69 6.5 2.5 0 0 1 0 1 0
2010 Oakland 16 58 9.0 3 0 0 1 0 1 0
2011 Oakland 16 63 7.0 7.5 1 73 0 0 3 0
Totals 95 369 42.5 27.5 2 75 8 1 8 0

Personal life[edit]

Wimbley owns a Florida-based dog breeding facility, Gold Label Kennels, that specializes in breeding, training, raising, showing, adopting, and rescuing American Bully dogs.[8] As a “pet project,” Wimbley is also working on a dog registry, the Bulldog Breed Coalition Registry, which offers more innovative options for a broader population of people to be able to track their dogs’ ancestry.

Wimbley competed and won the 2013 Super Bowl Cook-off Competition on the Rachael Ray Show. His competitors were New York Giants tight end Martellus Bennett and Indianapolis Colts defensive end Dwight Freeney. Wimbley had the best recipe as determined by former NFL player and Fox analyst Tony Siragusa. Wimbley created andouille sausage and shrimp over grits, a dish that was well-suited with New Orleans as the Super Bowl host. Wimbley won a large, Super Bowl-style ring.[9]

References[edit]

External links[edit]