Kanata

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Kanata is an aboriginal word meaning "village" or "settlement."[citation needed]

Name of Canada[edit]

The Mohawk word "kanata" was thought to have been the origin of Canada's name. But, as evidenced by the journal of Jacques Cartier regarding his voyage to present-day Quebec,[1] Canada, in the early 16th century, Canada's name stems from the Saint-Lawrence Iroquoian word "Canada",[2] which holds the same meaning. This Iroquoian language was spoken by the inhabitants of Stadacona and the neighbouring region near present-day Quebec City in the 16th century,[3] with words having similarities to those in related Iroquoian languages, most notably in Mohawk and Oneida.

Kanata, Ontario is the name of a former city, now part of the amalgamated city of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cartier, Jacques (2004-05-01) [1545]. Relation originale de Jacques Cartier. Paris: Tross. p. 48. 
  2. ^ Trigger, Bruce G.; Pendergast, James F. (1978). "Saint-Lawrence Iroquoians". Handbook of North American Indians Volume 15. Washington: Smithsonian Institution. pp. 357–361. OCLC 58762737. 
  3. ^ Cartier, Jacques (2004-05-01) [1545]. Relation originale de Jacques Cartier. Paris: Tross. p. 48.