Kanata

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Not to be confused with katana.
For other uses, see Kanata (disambiguation).

Kanata is an aboriginal word meaning "village" or "settlement."[citation needed]

Name of Canada[edit]

Main article: Name of Canada

The Mohawk word "kanata" was thought to have been the origin of Canada's name. But, as evidenced by the journal of Jacques Cartier regarding his voyage to present-day Quebec,[1] Canada, in the early 16th century, Canada's name stems from the Saint-Lawrence Iroquoian word "Canada",[2] which holds the same meaning. This Iroquoian language was spoken by the inhabitants of Stadacona and the neighbouring region near present-day Quebec City in the 16th century,[3] with words having similarities to those in related Iroquoian languages, most notably in Mohawk and Oneida.

Kanata, Ontario is the name of a former city, now part of the amalgamated city of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cartier, Jacques (2004-05-01) [1545]. Relation originale de Jacques Cartier. Paris: Tross. p. 48. 
  2. ^ Trigger, Bruce G.; Pendergast, James F. (1978). "Saint-Lawrence Iroquoians". Handbook of North American Indians Volume 15. Washington: Smithsonian Institution. pp. 357–361. OCLC 58762737. 
  3. ^ Cartier, Jacques (2004-05-01) [1545]. Relation originale de Jacques Cartier. Paris: Tross. p. 48.