Kanchelsis

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Kanchelsis
Game background
Title(s) Lord of Vampires
Home plane Infinite Layers of the Abyss
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Portfolio Blood, debauchery, magic, seduction, vampirism
Domains Chaos, Charm, Darkness, Death, Destruction, Evil, Trickery
Design details

In many campaign settings for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, Kanchelsis is a deity of blood, debauchery, magic, and vampirism. His symbol is a bat with glowing red eyes.

Publication history[edit]

Kanchelsis was first detailed in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about his priesthood.[1]

Kanchelsis was detailed for third edition in the article "Forgotten Faiths" in Dragon #359 (September 2007), by F. Wesley Schneider.[2]

Description[edit]

Kanchelsis takes on two different forms:

The Beast resembles a wild-eyed, tousle-headed human male with powerful muscles and taloned claws. He is excessively hairy. He is a wild creature, the personification of the wild beast that rages inside all vampires. He runs with wolves and tears out throats, drinking as much blood as he can swallow.

The Rake resembles a slim, elegant human or half-elf with long, slender hands, finely-chiseled features, and a friendly smile. He is always dressed immaculately. This is the more elegant side of vampirism, savoring blood as mortal sophisticates might savor wine. He is a charismatic seducer, a lover of high fashion, debauchery, and art.

Relationships[edit]

Kanchelsis's primary servants are the blood fiends (vampiric demons) Memnul, Dagrobard, and Vonce. Kanchelsis is also the mastermind behind and ultimate leader of the Union of Eclipses, a world-spanning brotherhood of undead spellcasters (introduced in Dungeon #123).[3] Prominent leaders of the Union of Eclipses include the vampire sorcerer Baucojin, known as the "Crimson Eclipse;" the lich-lord Huersefful, the "Shrouded Eclipse;" the elven vampire queen Ivirere, called "the Verdant Eclipse;" and the wizard-lord Vlad Tolenkov. Dozens of elder vampires meet in Kanchelsis's mansion every year to discuss their plans for the Union. Even the vampire lords of the Demiplane of Dread are said to give Kanchelsis a grudging amount of fear and respect.

Realm[edit]

Kanchelsis lives in the Lair of the Beast & Mansion of the Rake on the 487th layer of the Abyss. His domain there is described as a vast mansion that changes continuously based on Kanchelsis's whims. The halls are filled with mirrors and framed portraits, and the manse includes aviaries and chilling gardens. His home is awash in blood, and some rooms are said to be sculpted from living blood sculptures; some of this blood is spiced with narcotics and alkaloids. The vampyres, nosferatu, and similar followers who populate the mansion are in a constant state of extreme hunger, as Kanchelsis sadistically offers them only the most meager of blood rations.

Dogma[edit]

Kanchelsis's dogma, like the deity, is split, involving both a hunger for sophistication and debauchery and a terrible, insatiable lust for blood and violence.

Worshippers[edit]

Kanchelsis is worshipped by some vampires, drow, and all who hunger for luxury and blood.

Myths[edit]

Bad blood[edit]

Long ago, in the eldest of days, the gods sacrificed their own blood to create the world. Divine blood was directed by divine will to bring continents, mountains, and whole races into being. Something went terribly wrong, however, when the sacrifice of the Seldarine mingled with the blood of the nameless creator of humanity. The resulting creation combined the beauty and agelessness of the elder elves and the hunger and ambition of humans, becoming known as Kanchelsis, the first vampire. The elven gods will not speak of this myth, or explain how their good intentions could have gone so awry. It's been hypothesized that some elder evil corrupted the elven magic at a critical moment.

Pelor[edit]

In an alternate myth found in Dragon #346, the first vampires were created by Pelor, who cursed them for turning away from his light and pursuing evil magic instead. The myth suggests that Pelor would forgive them, if they were interested in forgiveness.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sargent, Carl. Monster Mythology (TSR, 1992)
  2. ^ Schneider, F. Wesley. "Forgotten Faiths." Dragon #359. Bellevue, WA: Paizo Publishing, 2007
  3. ^ Caralya, Anson. "Quicksilver Hourglass." Dungeon #123. Bellevue, WA: Paizo Publishing, 2005
  4. ^ Reynolds, Sean K. "Core Beliefs: Pelor." Dragon #346. Bellevue, WA: Paizo Publishing, 2006

Additional reading[edit]

External links[edit]