Kara Cooney

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Kara Cooney
Dr Kara Cooney presenting at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, June 2014
Born Kathlyn Conney
Alma mater Johns Hopkins University
Occupation Egyptologist and Assistant Professor of Egyptian Art and Architecture at UCLA
Spouse(s) Neil Crawford
Website
karacooney.com

Dr. Kathlyn M. Cooney aka Dr. Kara Cooney is an Egyptologist and Assistant Professor of Egyptian Art and Architecture at UCLA. She was awarded a PhD in 2002 by Johns Hopkins University for Near Eastern Studies. She was part of an archaeological team excavating at the artisans' village of Deir el Medina in Egypt, as well as Dahshur and various tombs at Thebes.

In 2002 she was Kress Fellow at the National Gallery of Art and worked on the preparation of the Cairo Museum exhibition Quest for Immortality: Treasures of Ancient Egypt. She was a member of the teaching staff at Stanford and Howard University. In 2005, she acted as fellow curator for Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Raised in Houston, she obtained her B.A. from the University of Texas.

She worked on two Discovery Channel documentary series: Out of Egypt, first aired in August 2009, and Egypt's Lost Queen, which also featured Dr. Zahi Hawass.

Publications[edit]

Books[edit]

  • The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt (To Be Released Oct 2014) [1]
  • The Cost of Death: The Social and Economic Value of Ancient Egyptian Funerary Art in the Ramesside Period (2007)[2]

Articles and Book Chapters (Refereed and Invited)[edit]

  • The Edifice of Taharqa:Ritual Function and the Role of the King, Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt 37: 15-47. (2000)
  • Prologue in: The Quest for Immortality: Treasures of Ancient Egypt, Betsy M. Bryan and Erik Hornung, eds. (Washington, D.C.): xi-xiv. (2002)
  • The Value of Art in New Kingdom Egypt: the Commission of Private Funerary Arts in the Ramesside Period, Center: Journal of the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art 22: 69-73. (2002)
  • Review of Private Life in New Kingdom Egypt by Lynn Meskell, American Journal of Archaeology 107 (2003). (2003)
  • The Daily Offering Meal in the Ritual of Amenhotep I: An Instance of the Local Adaptation of Cult Liturgy, with J. Brett McClain, Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions 5, 41-79. (2005)
  • Zwischen Ägyptologie und Afrozentrismus, Ma'at. Archäologie Ägyptens 2, 6-11. (2005)
  • Scarabs in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Part I: Intimate Protection or Distributed Propaganda? co-authored with Johnna Tyrrell, PalArch, Netherlands Scientific Journal 4, 1 (October): 1-13. (2005)
  • Scarabs in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Part II: Catalogue of Scarabs in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, co-authored with Johnna Tyrrell, PalArch, Netherlands Scientific Journal 4, 1 (October): 15-98. (2005)
  • An Informal Workshop: Textual Evidence for Private Funerary Art Production in the Ramesside Period: Living and Writing in Deir el Medine: Socio-historical Embodiment of Deir el Medine Texts, Aegyptiaca Helvetica series 19, Andreas Dorn and Tobias Hoffmann, eds. (Basel): 43-56. (2006)
  • The Ancient Egyptian Labor Force : The Egyptian World, T. Wilkinson, ed., Routledge Press (London). (2007)
  • The Functional Materialism of Death: a Case Study of Funerary Material in the Ramesside Period : Das Heilige und die Ware, IBAES VII, M. Fitzenreiter, ed., Golden House Publications (London). (2007)[3]

Personal[edit]

Cooney's paternal grandparents were from County Cork in Ireland. She is named after her Irish-Protestant grandmother Kathlyn Mary, who was disowned by her family for marrying her Irish-Catholic grandfather James. Kara's mother is Italian, her grandmother was from the Abruzzi region, and her grandfather from Naples.[4]

Kara Cooney is married to TV writer/producer Neil Crawford.[5][6] She has a son named Julian (born 2010).[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise To Power in Ancient Egypt". Crown. Retrieved 2014-06-16. 
  2. ^ Exell, Karen, The Cost of Death: The Social and Economic Value of Ancient Egyptian Funerary Art in the Ramesside Period, American Journal of Archeology. Retrieved August 2011
  3. ^ "Kara Cooney". Kara Cooney. Retrieved 2011-08-04. 
  4. ^ "Dr. Kara Cooney and a Few More Words About Ancient Egypt • Public Republic". Public-republic.net. Retrieved 2011-08-04. 
  5. ^ "Kara Cooney". Kara Cooney. Retrieved 2011-08-04. 
  6. ^ Sullivan, Meg (2009-06-30). "Egyptologist pulls together threads woven through ancient civilizations / UCLA Today". Today.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2011-08-04. 
  7. ^ "Kara Cooney Facebook Page Post". 2012-05-14. Retrieved 2014-06-15. 

External links[edit]