Karen Cross

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Karen Cross
Country United Kingdom Great Britain
Born (1974-02-19) 19 February 1974 (age 41)
Exeter, Devon
Turned pro 1993
Retired 2001
Prize money US$196,033
Singles
Career record 156–184
Career titles 0 WTA, 3 ITF
Highest ranking No. 134 (22 June 1998)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open Q1 (1999)
French Open Q3 (1998)
Wimbledon 3R (1997)
US Open Q1 (1997, 1998, 1999)
Doubles
Career record 76–102
Career titles 0 WTA, 3 ITF
Highest ranking No. 196 (5 October 1998)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Wimbledon 1R (1998, 1999)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Wimbledon 1R (1999)
Last updated on: 12 February 2015.

Karen Cross (born 19 February 1974 in Exeter, Devon) is a left-handed British former tennis player who competed at eight Wimbledon Championships during the 1990s and early 2000s, as well as for the Great Britain Fed Cup team in both 1994 and 1998.[1] During the course of her career Cross managed to win six titles on the ITF circuit (3 in singles and 3 in doubles) and she achieved her highest Women's Tennis Association singles ranking of world number 134 on 22 June, 1998.[2][3] She is currently a part-time tennis coach at the Roehampton Club and since retirement from the professional circuit she has regularly competed on the ITF senior circuit, reaching a career-high ranking of world no.4 in the women's over-35's age group.[4][5]

At the Grand Slams, Cross's best result came at Wimbledon in 1997 when she won three matches to qualify before reaching the third round where she was defeated by the reigning French Open champion, Iva Majoli, in three close sets.[6]

Cross managed to gain victories over a number of players who would go on to achieve (or had already experienced) great success on the WTA tour, the most notable being future two-time Australian Open champion and world number 2 Li Na (in December 1999)[7] and future multiple Grand Slam doubles champion and doubles world number 1, Roberta Vinci (in July 2000).[8] Other notable defeated opponents included future two-time WTA titlist and world number 19 Sybille Bammer,[9] future world number 32 Jelena Kostanić,[10] future one-time WTA titlist and world number 48 Milagros Sequera[11] and former one-time WTA titlist and world number 56, Monique Javer.[12]

ITF circuit finals[edit]

Singles (3–0)[edit]

Finals by category
$100,000 tournaments (0/0)
$75,000 tournaments (0/0)
$50,000 tournaments (0/0)
$25,000 tournaments (0/0)
$10,000 tournaments (3/0)
Finals by surface
Hard (0/0)
Clay (2/0)
Grass (1/0)
Carpet (0/0)
Result Date Category Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 26 July 1993 ITF $10,000 Istanbul, Turkey Clay Turkey Gulberk Gultekin 4–6, 7–5, 7–6(7–4)
Winner 8 May 1995 ITF $10,000 Lee-on-Solent, Great Britain Clay United Kingdom Jo Durie 6–4, 6–4
Winner 8 July 1997 ITF $10,000 Felixstowe, Great Britain Grass South Africa Surina de Beer 6–1, 7–5

Doubles (3–3)[edit]

Finals by category
$100,000 tournaments (0/0)
$75,000 tournaments (0/0)
$50,000 tournaments (0/0)
$25,000 tournaments (1/0)
$10,000 tournaments (2/3)
Finals by surface
Hard (1/1)
Clay (1/1)
Grass (1/1)
Carpet (0/0)
Result Date Category Tournament Surface Partnering Opponents Score
Runner-up 24 April 1995 ITF $10,000 Edinburgh, United Kingdom Clay United Kingdom Elizabeth Jelfs Australia Robyn Mawdsley
United Kingdom Lorna Woodroffe
3–6, 1–6
Winner 8 May 1995 ITF $10,000 Edinburgh, United Kingdom Clay United Kingdom Elizabeth Jelfs United Kingdom Kaye Hand
United Kingdom Claire Taylor
3–6, 6–3, 6–0
Winner 7 August 1995 ITF $10,000 Southsea, United Kingdom Grass United Kingdom Jane Wood Israel Nataly Cahana
Israel Oshri Shashua
6–4, 7–5
Runner-up 14 July 1997 ITF $10,000 Frinton, United Kingdom Grass Russia Natalia Egorova United Kingdom Jo Ward
United Kingdom Lorna Woodroffe
4–6, 6–2, 0–6
Runner-up 29 September 1997 ITF $10,000 Nottingham, United Kingdom Hard (i) United Kingdom Elizabeth Jelfs United Kingdom Lucie Ahl
United Kingdom Jo Ward
6–7(8–6), 2–6
Winner 12 April 1999 ITF $25,000 Cagnes-sur-Mer, France Hard United Kingdom Amanda Grahame Australia Louise Pleming
France Catherine Tanvier
6–4, 3–6, 7–6(8–6)

Performance timelines[edit]

Singles[edit]

Tournament 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 W–L SR
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A Q1 A 0–0 0 / 0
French Open A Q3 Q1 Q1 A 0–0 0 / 0
Wimbledon 1R 1R 1R Q1 3R 2R 2R 1R 2R 5–8 0 / 8
US Open A Q1 Q1 Q1 A 0–0 0 / 0
Win–Loss 0–1 0–1 0–1 0–0 2–1 1–1 1–1 0–1 1–1 5–8 0 / 8
Year-End Ranking 325[13] 295[14] 241[15] 305[16] 146[17] 162[18] 198[19] 311[20] UNR[21]

Doubles[edit]

Tournament 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 W–L SR
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A 0–0 0 / 0
French Open A 0–0 0 / 0
Wimbledon Q2 A Q2 A Q1 A 1R 1R Q1 0–2 0 / 2
US Open A 0–0 0 / 0
Win–Loss 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–1 0–0 0–2 0 / 2

Mixed doubles[edit]

Tournament 1999 W–L SR
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A 0–0 0 / 0
French Open A 0–0 0 / 0
Wimbledon 1R 0–1 0 / 1
US Open A 0–0 0 / 0
Win–Loss 0–1 0–1 0 / 1

Fed Cup[edit]

1994 Federation Cup Europe/Africa Zone
Date Venue Surface Round Opponents Final match score Match Opponent Rubber score
20 Apr 1994 Bad Waltersdorf Clay RR  Russia 2–1 Doubles(with Julie Pullin) Lutrova/Panova 5–7, 5–7 (L)
1998 Federation Cup Europe/Africa Zone
14–16 Apr 1998 Murcia Clay RR  Portugal 1–2 Singles Sofia Prazeres 6–2, 2–6, 4–6 (L)
 Poland 1–2 Singles Magdalena Grzybowska 1–6, 2–6 (L)
 Madagascar 3–0 Singles Faratiana Rasoarilalao 6–1, 6–3 (W)

References[edit]

External links[edit]