Karl Pruter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Bishop Karl Hugo Prüter (July 3, 1920 – November 18, 2007) was an Old Catholic bishop.

Pruter was raised in the Lutheran church, and was a Congregationalist minister under the name of Hugo Rehling Pruter Sr. from 1945 to 1958. In the Congregationalist Church he was one of the leaders in the liturgical movement within the church during the late 1940s and early 1950s. He was also an opponent of the merger of the Congregational Christian Churches with the Evangelical and Reformed Church to form the United Church of Christ, begun in 1957 and concluded in 1961. As a continuing Congregationalist, he led his church and several other Midwest Congregational churches to reject the merger and form a new body, the Central Association of Congregational Christian Churches.

In the late 1960s, Pruter became involved in the Free Catholic Movement, an association that lasted until his death. Pruter's introduction to the Free Catholic Movement and Old Catholicism came in 1963, when he traveled to Europe where he met several leaders of the Old Catholic tradition. When he returned to the United States, he settled in Boston hoping to find an available church or bishop. Not finding any, he arranged with Archbishop Peter A. Zurawetsky to start a new church, in the Back Bay area of Boston, which stressed the contemplative life, mysticism, and a faith based on personal experience.[1]

He was consecrated Bishop of the Diocese of Boston by Archbishops Zurawetsky and Uladyslau Ryzy-Ryski in 1967. The following year, Pruter designated his diocese an independent communion. After a meeting the following year, the new Christ Catholic Church (Pruter) was recognized when its constitution and canons were given to it by Archbishop Zurawetsky.[1]

Pruter was a vigorous publisher and distributor of literature in his fields of interest. The press he founded, St. Willibrord's Press, was a major distributor of literature about the Old Catholic church. He wrote a number of tracts and pamphlets, as well as books such as The Teachings of the Great Mystics and A History of the Old Catholic Church. He also operated the Tsali Bookstore, specializing in American Indian literature, and Cathedral Books which emphasizes literature about the topic of peace.[1]

In his later years Pruter made his home in Highlandville, Missouri. He gained notice for Christ's Catholic Church when he converted a small wash-house near the east site of his home there into a chapel. Since the official chapel of a bishop is technically designated as a 'cathedral' the structure was featured for decades in the Guinness Book of World Records as "The World's Smallest Cathedral". The structure in later years featured a small blue copola, small stained glass window, and three rows of pews about five feet across. Pruter died on 18 November 2007.

Books by Karl Pruter[edit]

  • Pruter, Karl. (1997) The mystic path San Bernardino, Calif.: St. Willibrord's Press. Book, Vol. 5 in a series/set )
  • Pruter, Karl. (1996) The priest's handbook 2nd, rev. and expanded edition. San Bernardino, Calif.: St. Willibrord's Press. Book, Vol. 4 in a series/set )
  • Pruter, Karl. (1996) The directory of autocephalous bishops of the churches of the Apostolic succession 8th, rev. and expanded. edition. San Bernardino, Calif.: St. Willibrord's Press. Book, Vol. 1 in a series/set )
  • Pruter, Karl. (1996) The Old Catholic Church: A history and chronology 2nd, rev. and expanded. edition. San Bernardino, Calif.: St. Willibrord's Press.
  • Pruter, Karl. (1995) A directory of autocephalous bishops of the Churches of the Apostolic succession 7th, rev. and expanded. edition. San Bernardino, Calif.: St. Willibrord's Press.
  • Pruter, Karl. (1987) Jewish Christians in the United States: A bibliography New York: Garland Pub.. Book )
  • Pruter, Karl. (1986) Bishops extraordinary San Bernardino, Calif.: Borgo Press. Book )
  • Pruter, Karl. (1986) The strange partnership of George Alexander McGuire and Marcus Garvey San Bernardino, Calif.: Borgo Press.
  • Pruter, Karl. (1985) The theology of Congregationalism San Bernardino, Calif.: Borgo Press.
  • Pruter, Karl. (1985) The teachings of the great mystics San Bernardino, Calif.: Borgo Press.
  • Pruter, Karl. (1985) Neo-congregationalism San Bernardino, Calif.: Borgo Press.
  • Pruter, Karl. (1985) A history of the Old Catholic Church San Bernardino, Calif.: Borgo Press.
  • Pruter, Karl. (1985) The people of God San Bernardino, Calif.: Borgo Press.

Book

  • Pruter, Karl; Melton, J. Gordon. (1983) The Old Catholic sourcebook New York: Garland Pub..

Episcipal Lineage of Karl Pruter[edit]

− − 1. Andrew, the Apostle of our Lord. Founded 38

− 2. Stachys, the Disciple, one of the 70 Apostles. 38 – 54

− 3. Onesimos 54 – 68

− 4. Polykarpos 69 – 89

− 5. Ploutarchos 89 – 105

− 6. Sedekion 105 – 114

− 7. Diogenes 114 – 129

− 8. Eleftherios 129 – 136

− 9. Felix 136 – 141

− 10. Polykarpos II 141 – 144

− 11. Athenodoros 144 – 148

− 12. Euzoios 148 – 154

− 13. Laurentios 154 – 166

− 14. Alypios 166 – 169

− 15. Pertinax 169 – 187

− 16. Olympianos 187 – 198

− 17. Markos I 198 – 211

− 18. Philadelphos 211 – 214

− 19. Kyriakos I 214 – 230

− 20. Kastinos 230 – 237

− 21. Eugenios I 237 – 242

− 22. Titos 242 – 272

− 23. Dometios 272 – 303

− 24. Roufinos 303

− 25. Provos 303 – 315

− 26. Metrophanes I 315 – 325

− 27. Alexandros 325 – 340

− 28. Paulos I, the Confessor 340 – 41, 342 – 34, 348 – 50

− 29. Eusebios 341 – 342

− 30. Makedonios I 344 – 348, 350 – 360

− 31. Eudoxios 360 – 369

− 32. Demophilos 369 – 379

− 33. Evagrios 379

− 34. Maximos I 380

− 35. Gregory, the Theologian 379 – 381

− 36. Nectarios 381 – 397

− 37. John I, the Chrysostom 398 – 404

− 38. Arsakios 404 – 405

− 39. Attikos 406 – 425

− 40. Sisinios I 425 – 427

− 41. Nestorios 428 – 431

− 42. Maximianos 431 – 434

− 43. Proklos 434 – 447

− 44. Flavianos 447 – 449

− 45. Anatolios 449 – 458

− 46. Gennadios I 458 – 471

− 47. Akakios 471 – 489

− 48. Favritas (Fravitas) 489 – 490

− 49. Euphemios 490 – 496

− 50. Makedonios II 496 – 511

− 51. Timotheos I 511 – 518

− 52. John II, the Cappadocian 518 – 520

− 53. Epiphanios 520 – 536

− 54. Anthimos 535 – 536

− 55. Menas 536 – 552

− 56. Eutychios I 552 – 565, 577 – 582

− 57. John III 566 – 577

− 58. Eutychios II 577 – 582

− 59. John IV, the Faster 582 – 595

− 60. Kyriakos II 595 – 607

− 61. Thomas I 607 – 610

− 62. Sergios I 610 – 638

− 63. Pyrros I (later returned as Pyrros II) 638 – 641

− 64. Paulos II 641 – 652

− 65. Pyrros II [same as Pyrros I] 652 or 654

− 66. Petros 652 – 664

− 67. Thomas II 665 – 668

− 68. John V 668 – 674

− 69. Constantine I 674 – 676

− 70. Theodoros I 676 – 678, 683 – 686

− 71. Georgios I 678 – 683

− 72. Paulos III 686 – 693

− 73. Kallinikos I 693 – 705

− 74. Kyros 705 – 711

− 75. John VI 711 – 715

− 76. Germanos I, the Confessor 715 – 730

− 77. Anastasios 730 – 751

− 78. Constantine II 754 – 766

− 79. Niketas, the Slav 766 – 780

− 80. Paulos IV 780 – 784

− 81. Tarasios 784 – 806

− 82. Nikephoros I 806 – 815

− 83. Theodotos, Melissenos 815 – 821

− 84. Antonios I, Kasymatas 821 – 826

− 85. John VII the Grammatikos 826 – 842

− 86. Methodios I, the Confessor 842 – 846

− 87. Ignatios I, the Prince 846 – 857, 867 – 878

− 88. Photios I 857 – 867, 878 – 886

− 89. Stephanos I, the Prince 886 – 893

− 90. Antonios II, Kavleas 893 – 895

− 91. Nikolaos I, the Mystic 895 – 906, 911 – 925

− 92. Euthymios I 906 – 911

− 93. Stephanos II 925 – 928

− 94. Tryphon 928 – 931

− 95. Theophylctos, Lakapenos, the Princeling 933 – 956

− 96. Polyeuctos 956 – 970

− 97. Vasilios I, Skamandrenos 970 – 974

− 98. Antonios III, Skandalios, also Stoudites 974 – 980

− 99. Nikolaos II, Chrysoverges 984 – 995

− 100. Michael, the Syrian 990

− 101. Leontius 993

− 102. John 1015

− 103. Theopemptus 1037

− 104. Hilarion 1051

− 105. George 1072

− 106. John II 1080

− 107. John III 1089

− 108. Ephraim 1096

− 109. Nicholas 1098

− 110. Nicephorus 1108

− 111. Nicetas 1124

− 112. Michael II 1127

− 113. Clement 1197

− 114. Constantine 1136

− 115. Theodore 1160

− 116. John IV 1164

− 117. Constantine II 1167

− 118. Nicephorus II 1185

− 119. Matthew 1201

− 120. Kyrill I 1205

− 121. Joseph 1240

− 122. Kyrill II 1250

− 123. Maximus 1283

− 124. Peter 1308

− 125. Theognostes 1328

− 126. Alexis 1353

− 127. Cyprian 1380

− 128. Photius 1410

− 129. Isidore 1432

− 130. Jonah 1448

− 131. Theodosius 1462

− 132. Philip I 1467

− 133. Gerontius 1472

− 134. Zosimus 1491

− 135. Simon 1496

− 136. Barlaam 1511

− 137. Daniel 1522

− 138. Joasaph 1539

− 139. Macarius 1542

− 140. Athanasius 1564

− 141. Philip 1565

− 142. Cyrill III 1568

− 143. Anthony 1572

− 144. Dionysius 1582

− 145. Job 1587

− 146. Hermogenes 1606.

− 147. Philaret 1620

− 148. Joasaph I 1631

− 149. Joseph 1642

− 150. Nikon 1653

− 151. Joasaph II 1667

− 152. Pitirim 1672

− 153. Joachim 1673

− 154. Adrian 1690

− 155. Metropolitan Stephen (Yavorsky), of Rostov, 1701

− 156. The Most Holy Synod 1721 – 1918

− 157. Patriarch Bishop Tikhon – October 19, 1897

− 158. Bishop Josef Kedrovsky / Kedroffsky – 1923

− 159. Bishop Josef Klimovicz – 1935

− 160. Bishop Peter A. Zurawetsky – October 15, 1950

− 161. Bishop Karl Hugo Pruter – November 7, 1967

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions (2nd ed.). Detroit: Gale Research Company. ISBN 0-8103-2133-5.