Kashiwado Tsuyoshi

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"Kashiwado" redirects here. For the Ozeki, see Kashiwado Risuke.
Kashiwado Tsuyoshi
Kashiwado handprint.JPG
Kashiwado's handprint displayed on a monument in Ryōgoku, Tokyo
Personal information
Born Tsuyoshi Togashi
(1938-11-29)November 29, 1938
Yamagata, Japan
Died December 8, 1996(1996-12-08) (aged 58)
Height 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)
Weight 139 kg (306 lb)
Career
Stable Isenoumi
Record 715-295-140
Debut September, 1954
Highest rank Yokozuna (September, 1961)
Retired July, 1969
Championships 5 (Makuuchi)
1 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
Special Prizes Fighting Spirit (2)
Technique (4)
Outstanding Performance (2)
* Up to date as of July 2007.

Kashiwado Tsuyoshi (柏戸 剛, November 29, 1938 - December 8, 1996) was a sumo wrestler from Japan. He was the sport's 47th yokozuna, fighting at sumo's highest rank from 1961 to 1969. After his retirement he became an elder of the Japan Sumo Association and ran his own training stable from 1970 until his death.

Career[edit]

Born in what is now part of the city of Tsuruoka in the northern prefecture of Yamagata, Kashiwado made his professional debut in September 1954, joining Isenoumi stable. He initially fought under his own surname of Togashi. Upon reaching the top makuuchi division in September 1958 he rose rapidly up the rankings. In only his fourth top division tournament, following a shikona change to Kashiwado, he was runner-up to yokozuna Tochinishiki with a 13-2 record and earned special prizes for Fighting Spirit and Technique. He made the san'yaku ranks in November 1959, winning promotion to ōzeki in September 1960 and taking his first top division yūshō in January 1961. After taking part in a playoff for the championship in September of that year, he was promoted to yokozuna, joining the aging pair of Asashio and Wakanohana who were soon to retire.

Kashiwado was to win five top division championships, a long way behind the thirty-two captured by his rival Taihō, who was promoted to yokozuna simultaneously with him. He was however a tournament runner-up on no fewer than fifteen occasions. He suffered from many injury problems during his career, which led to him being dubbed the "glass yokozuna". He failed to complete four tournaments in a row from January to July 1963. However he made a spectacular comeback in September 1963, winning his first championship as a yokozuna (and second yūshō in total) with a perfect 15-0 record. He was listed as a yokozuna on the banzuke for 47 tournaments, which puts him in equal 6th place on the all-time list.[1] He was popular among sumo crowds, appealing to those who found Taihō too dominant.[2] The eight years in which the two shared the yokozuna rank was known as the Hakuhō era, a combination of their names (Haku is another reading of Kashi.)[2]

Fighting style[edit]

Kashiwado's favoured kimarite or techniques were migi-yotsu (a left hand outside, right hand inside grip on the opponents mawashi), yorikiri (force out) and tsukidashi (thrust out). In all, about sixty percent of his wins were by either force out or force out and down (yoritaoshi).

Retirement from sumo[edit]

After retiring from active competition in July 1969 he remained in the sumo world as an elder, and he opened up his own stable, Kagamiyama, in November 1970. He coached Tagaryū to the top division championship in September 1984. He also served as a director of the Sumo Association and was head of the judges committee until 1994.[3] He died of liver failure in 1996, at the age of 58. Taihō was at Kashiwado's bedside and was distraught over his death.[4]

Career record[edit]

  • The Kyushu tournament was first held in 1957, and the Nagoya tournament in 1958.
Kashiwado Tsuyoshi[5]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1954 x x x Not held
3–3
Maezumo

 
Not held
1955 East Jonokuchi #12
6–2
 
East Jonidan #37
6–2
 
West Sandanme #84
5–3
 
Not held East Sandanme #62
2–5
 
Not held
1956 East Sandanme #66
7–1
 
West Sandanme #20
6–2
 
West Makushita #69
8–0–P
Champion

 
Not held West Makushita #17
4–4
 
Not held
1957 West Makushita #16
5–3
 
West Makushita #8
4–4
 
East Makushita #8
7–1
 
Not held West Makushita #1
5–3
 
West Jūryō #22
8–7
 
1958 East Jūryō #21
7–8
 
West Jūryō #22
12–3
Champion

 
West Jūryō #10
11–4–PPP
 
East Jūryō #4
12–3
 
East Maegashira #20
9–6
 
West Maegashira #17
8–7
 
1959 East Maegashira #16
8–7
 
West Maegashira #13
13–2
FT
East Maegashira #4
5–10
 
East Maegashira #8
9–6
 
East Maegashira #3
12–3
F
East Komusubi #1
8–7
 
1960 East Komusubi #1
9–6
T
West Sekiwake #2
9–6
O
West Sekiwake #1
10–5
T
East Sekiwake #1
11–4
TO
West Ōzeki #1
12–3
 
East Ōzeki #1
11–4
 
1961 West Ōzeki #1
13–2
 
East Ōzeki #1
12–3
 
East Ōzeki #1
10–5
 
West Ōzeki #1
11–4
 
West Ōzeki #1
12–3–PP
 
East Yokozuna #2
12–3
 
1962 West Yokozuna #1
10–5
 
East Yokozuna #2
11–4
 
West Yokozuna #1
11–4
 
West Yokozuna #1
11–4
 
West Yokozuna #1
11–4
 
West Yokozuna #1
12–3
 
1963 West Yokozuna #1
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Yokozuna #1
5–1–9
 
West Yokozuna #1
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Yokozuna #1
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Yokozuna #1
15–0
 
East Yokozuna #1
10–5
 
1964 West Yokozuna #1
12–3
 
West Yokozuna #1
14–1
 
West Yokozuna #1
11–1–3
 
West Yokozuna #1
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
East Yokozuna #2
4–2–9
 
East Yokozuna #2
2–4–9
 
1965 West Yokozuna #1
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Yokozuna #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Yokozuna #2
9–6
 
East Yokozuna #2
12–3
 
East Yokozuna #2
12–3–PP
 
West Yokozuna #1
1–1–13
 
1966 West Yokozuna #2
14–1
 
East Yokozuna #1
10–5
 
West Yokozuna #1
12–3
 
West Yokozuna #1
12–3
 
West Yokozuna #1
13–2–P
 
West Yokozuna #1
10–5
 
1967 West Yokozuna #1
12–3
 
East Yokozuna #2
11–4
 
West Yokozuna #1
13–2
 
West Yokozuna #1
14–1
 
East Yokozuna #1
9–6
 
East Yokozuna #2
11–4
 
1968 East Yokozuna #2
9–6
 
West Yokozuna #1
9–6
 
East Yokozuna #1
4–4–7
 
East Yokozuna #1
10–5
 
East Yokozuna #1
9–6
 
West Yokozuna #1
11–4
 
1969 West Yokozuna #1
10–5
 
West Yokozuna #1
9–6
 
East Yokozuna #1
9–6
 
West Yokozuna #1
Retired
1–3
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Japan Sumo Association Banzuke Topics, May 2008. Retrieved on 2008-05-02
  2. ^ a b Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. p. 51. ISBN 0-8348-0283-X. 
  3. ^ Kirkup, James (12 December 1996). "Obituary: Kashiwado". The Independent. Retrieved 1 March 2011. 
  4. ^ Nobuaki Omi (2008-07-09). "Squabbling yokozuna need history lesson". Daily Yomiuri Online. Retrieved 2008-07-09. [dead link]
  5. ^ "Kashiwado Tsuyoshi Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-07-29. 

External links[edit]

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Asashio Tarō III
47th Yokozuna
1961 - 1969
Next:
Taihō Kōki
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title