Kate Blackwell

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Kate Blackwell
Personal information
Full name Katherine Anne Blackwell
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium pace
International information
National side
Test debut (cap 145) 9 August 2005 v England women
Last Test 15 February 2008 v England women
ODI debut (cap 102) 13 December 2004 v India women
Last ODI 9 November 2008 v India women
T20I debut 2 September 2005 v England women
Last T20I 28 October 2008 v India women
Domestic team information
Years Team
2002-03-present New South Wales Breakers
2005-06 Wellington Blaze
2010 Middlesex Women cricket team
Career statistics
Competition Tests ODIs WT20I LA
Matches 4 41 6 136
Runs scored 180 475 119 2636
Batting average 25.71 19.00 39.66 32.13
100s/50s 0/1 0/1 0/0 2/17
Top score 72 57* 43* 102
Balls bowled - 18 18 239
Wickets - 0 0 5
Bowling average - - - 37.80
5 wickets in innings - - - 2
10 wickets in match - - - 0
Best bowling - - - 4/8
Catches/stumpings 7/- 12/- 2/– 37/–
Source: Cricinfo, 29 June 2014

Kathryn Anne Blackwell (born 31 August 1983) is an Australian cricketer.[1] Blackwell was born in Wagga Wagga, but raised in Yenda, a small rural town outside of Griffith, New South Wales. She and her identical twin sister Alex Blackwell were part of the Australian national team that won the 2005 Women's Cricket World Cup in South Africa. In the 2005-06 season she played for the Wellington Blaze in the State League.

Kate Blackwell played four Tests and 41 One Day International matches for Australia.[1] She is the 145th woman to play Test cricket for Australia,[2] and the 102nd woman to play One Day International cricket for Australia.[3]

As of June 2014 she has played 136 domestic limited-overs matches including 82 Women's National Cricket League games for the New South Wales Breakers.[4]

When asked about the frequent comparisons in the Australian media of the Blackwell twins to male cricketers, she said, "We look up to them a lot, but female cricketers should be recognized for themselves, not as the equivalent of Mark Waugh or Steve Waugh or Matthew Hayden or anybody."[5]

References[edit]