Kate Lynch

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Kate Lynch
Born (1959-06-28) June 28, 1959 (age 55)
Nationality Canadian
Occupation film, television and stage actor; theatre director; playwright

Kate Lynch (born June 29, 1959) is a Canadian film, television and stage actress, drama teacher, theatre director and playwright.

Biography[edit]

In 1980 she won the Genie Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role for Meatballs.[1] In her acceptance speech, however, she communicated the belief that she had won the award more for the fact of being a Canadian actress in a popular hit film, at a time when Canadian films still predominantly cast bigger-name stars from the United States, than for her actual performance.[2] She was nominated for the same award in 1988 for her role in Taking Care, although she did not win on that occasion.

Her other film credits include Lie with Me, Soup for One, Def-Con 4, God Bless the Child and The Guardian, while her television credits include Custard Pie, Anne of Avonlea and guest roles in Adderly, Danger Bay, Seeing Things, Queer as Folk, This Is Wonderland, Lost Girl and Degrassi.

As a playwright, her plays include Newcomer, Ten Minute Play: The Musical, The Road to Hell (cowritten with Michael Healey), Tales of the Blonde Assassin and Early August.[3] As a director, she has directed plays for the Shaw Festival, the Blyth Festival and Theatre Passe Muraille, including productions of William Shakespeare's Henry V, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Pericles and Cymbeline, Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot, Linda Griffiths' Age of Arousal, Terence Rattigan's French Without Tears, Noël Coward's Star Chamber, Eve Ensler's The Vagina Monologues[4] and Michael Healey's The Nuttalls. She has taught for University College Drama Program, the Stratford Festival, the Shaw Festival, Ryerson University and George Brown College.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tom Henighan, The Maclean's Companion to Arts and Culture. Raincoast Books, 2000. ISBN 978-1551922980.
  2. ^ Manjunath Pendakur, Canadian Dreams and American Control: The Political Economy of the Canadian Film Industry. Wayne State University Press, 1990. ISBN 978-0814319994. p. 192.
  3. ^ "Actors take us backstage in Early August". London Free Press, August 12, 2011.
  4. ^ Jeanne Beker, Finding Myself in Fashion. Viking Canada, 2011. ISBN 978-0670064571.

External links[edit]