Katewa

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Katewa
Jat Clan
Location Rajasthan
Vansh Nagavansha[1][2]
Branches Katewa, Karkotaka, Kikat, Kikata, Kikatwa
Language Hindi and Rajasthani
Religion Hinduism

Katewa is a gotra of Jats found in Rajasthan, India. The Katewa gotra people are also settled in Sindh, Pakistan. They are descendants of Karkotaka,[3] a Nagavanshi king. They were inhabiting Kikata Kingdom, during Mahabharata period. While some historians suggests that they belong to Yadu vansh. In fact they are Karkotaka or Vakataka Yadavas.[4][5] The group of people developed their Vamsha according to their system of worship of Devas and Nāgas. The worshippers of Karka Naga were known as Karkotaka. Thus, Karkotaka was a Nagavanshi king. The descendants of Karkotaka are still found in Jats of Rajasthan as Katewa clan.

It is believed that these were the people who lost maximum heads in war with Yavanas and hence were known as Katewas like Shishodia in Rajputs.[6][7]

The Katli River that flows in Jhunjhunu was named after them. There was a Janapada of Katewas on its banks. There is place called Khudana on the banks of Katni River where there was a fort ruled by Katewas.[8]

Some historians mention their presence in Jaipur region where they were called Kachwaha. Some of these people did not believe in widow re-marriage and became Rajputs and migrated to Narwar. Rest who did not leave their old traditions remained Jats.[9]

Karkotaka in Indian epics[edit]

Katewa (कटेवा) may be identified with one of The Mahabharata Tribes Karkotaka (कर्कॊटक).[10] Sabha Parva, Mahabharata/Book II Chapter 9, mentions names of chief Nagavanshi kings who attended the Sabha of Yudhishthira. Karkotaka was one of them.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rama Shankar Tripathi (1987). History of ancient India. p. 344. ISBN 81-208-0018-4. 
  2. ^ Naval Viyogi (2002). Nagas, the ancient rulers of India: their origin and history. p. 67. ISBN 81-7536-287-1. 
  3. ^ Dr Mahendra Singh Arya, Dharmpal Singh Dudee, Kishan Singh Faujdar and Vijendra Singh Narwar (1998). Ādhunik Jat Itihasa (The modern history of Jats). Agra. p. 233. 
  4. ^ Dr Mahendra Singh Arya, Dharmpal Singh Dudi, Kishan Singh Faujdar & Vijendra Singh Narwar: Ādhunik Jat Itihasa (The modern history of Jats), Agra 1998 (Page 226)
  5. ^ Thakur Deshraj: Jat Itihasa (Hindi), Maharaja Suraj Mal Smarak Shiksha Sansthan, Delhi, 1934, 2nd edition 1992 (Page 614)
  6. ^ Thakur Deshraj: Jat Itihasa (Hindi), Maharaja Suraj Mal Smarak Shiksha Sansthan, Delhi, 1934, 2nd edition 1992 (Page 614)
  7. ^ Dr Mahendra Singh Arya, Dharmpal Singh Dudi, Kishan Singh Faujdar & Vijendra Singh Narwar: Ādhunik Jat Itihasa (The modern history of Jats), Agra 1998 (Page 226)
  8. ^ Thakur Deshraj: Jat Itihasa (Hindi), Maharaja Suraj Mal Smarak Shiksha Sansthan, Delhi, 1934, 2nd edition 1992 (Page 614)
  9. ^ Thakur Deshraj: Jat Itihasa (Hindi), Maharaja Suraj Mal Smarak Shiksha Sansthan, Delhi, 1934, 2nd edition 1992 (Page 139)
  10. ^ Sandhya Jain (2004). Adideo Arya Devata, A Panoramic view of Tribal-Hindu Cultural Interface. Rupa & Co. p. 130.