Katharine St. George

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Katharine St. George
Katharine Price Collier St. George.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 27th district
In office
January 3, 1963 – January 3, 1965
Preceded by Robert R. Barry
Succeeded by John G. Dow
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 28th district
In office
January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1963
Preceded by Ralph A. Gamble
Succeeded by J. Ernest Wharton
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 29th district
In office
January 3, 1947 – January 3, 1953
Preceded by Augustus W. Bennet
Succeeded by J. Ernest Wharton
Personal details
Born (1894-07-12)July 12, 1894
Bridgnorth, England
Died May 2, 1983(1983-05-02) (aged 88)
Tuxedo Park, New York
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) George Baker Bligh St. George
Children Priscilla St. George

Katharine Price Collier St. George (July 12, 1894 – May 2, 1983) was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from New York, and a cousin of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.[1]

Early life and family[edit]

St. George was born in Bridgnorth, England, in 1894, to American parents. Her family returned to the United States when she was two years of age. Her father, Hiram Price Collier, was a former Unitarian minister.[2] Her mother, Catherine Delano Collier, was the younger sister of Sara Delano Roosevelt, mother of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.[3] St. George's younger sister, Sara Collier, was named in their aunt's honor.[4]

St. George married George Baker Bligh St. George, third son of the second Baronet St. George (see St George Baronets). Their only daughter Priscilla St. George was married first to Angier Biddle Duke (1915–1995), an American diplomat, and an heir to the Duke tobacco empire, from 1936[5] to 1940; and second to State Senator Allan A. Ryan, Jr. (1903–1981) from 1941[6] to 1950.[7]

St. George and her family resided briefly at 2144 Wyoming Avenue in Washington D.C.[8] before relocating to Tuxedo Park, New York, in June 1919, where she much later died at the age of eighty-eight, in 1983.

Career[edit]

She was a member of the town board of Tuxedo Park, New York, from 1926 until 1949. She was chair of the Orange County Republican committee from 1942 until 1948. She was a delegate to the 1944 Republican National Convention. She was elected to Congress in 1946 and served from January 3, 1947, until January 3, 1965. (Her opponent in the 1956 election was Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Bill Mauldin.) She narrowly lost a re-election bid in 1964 against liberal Democrat John G. Dow.

A proponent of pay equity, St. George was a supporter of the Equal Pay Act of 1963.[9] In 1962, St. George proposed that legislation be passed to ensure that women received equal pay for equal work.[10] Her proposals were drafted into a bill and introduced by Congresswoman Edith Green, an Oregon Democrat.[11] During a debate regarding the bill, St. George stated that opposing the bill was comparable to "being against motherhood".[12]

The bill met with stiff opposition from the United States Chamber of Commerce, but received support from the Kennedy Administration, the American Association of Women, the National Consumers League, the ACLU, and the AFL-CIO.[13]

The bill passed in both the House and the Senate, but it passed in different forms, and wasn’t ratified. Undaunted, in 1963, Green re-introduced the bill, and this time it was successfully ratified into law.[14]

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Roosevelt Genealogy," Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. (Accessed February 21, 2011.) http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/archives/resources/genealogy.html
  2. ^ "Roosevelt Genealogy," Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. (Accessed February 21, 2011.) http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/archives/resources/genealogy.html
  3. ^ "Roosevelt Genealogy," Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. (Accessed February 21, 2011.) http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/archives/resources/genealogy.html
  4. ^ "Roosevelt Genealogy," Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. (Accessed February 21, 2011.) http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/archives/resources/genealogy.html
  5. ^ “Milestone, Nov. 15, 1937.” TIME magazine, November 15, 1937 issue. Accessed February 21, 2011. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,758366,00.html
  6. ^ ALLAN A. RYAN WEDS MRS. ST. GEORGE DUKE in the New York Times on August 6, 1941 (subscription required)
  7. ^ MRS. RYAN WINS DIVORCE in the New York Times on December 14, 1950 (subscription required)
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ Suzanne O'Dea Schenken. Suzanne O'Dea. From suffrage to the Senate: an encyclopedia of American women in politics, Volume 2. p. 236 New York: ABC-Clio, 1999
  10. ^ Suzanne O'Dea Schenken. Suzanne O'Dea. From suffrage to the Senate: an encyclopedia of American women in politics, Volume 2. p. 236 New York: ABC-Clio, 1999
  11. ^ Suzanne O'Dea Schenken. Suzanne O'Dea. From suffrage to the Senate: an encyclopedia of American women in politics, Volume 2. p. 236 New York: ABC-Clio, 1999
  12. ^ Suzanne O'Dea Schenken. Suzanne O'Dea. From suffrage to the Senate: an encyclopedia of American women in politics, Volume 2. p. 236 New York: ABC-Clio, 1999
  13. ^ Suzanne O'Dea Schenken. Suzanne O'Dea. From suffrage to the Senate: an encyclopedia of American women in politics, Volume 2. p. 236 New York: ABC-Clio, 1999
  14. ^ Suzanne O'Dea Schenken. Suzanne O'Dea. From suffrage to the Senate: an encyclopedia of American women in politics, Volume 2. p. 236 New York: ABC-Clio, 1999
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Augustus W. Bennet
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 29th congressional district

1947–1953
Succeeded by
J. Ernest Wharton
Preceded by
Ralph A. Gamble
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 28th congressional district

1953–1963
Succeeded by
J. Ernest Wharton
Preceded by
Robert R. Barry
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 27th congressional district

1963–1965
Succeeded by
John G. Dow