Kathenotheism

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Kathenotheism is a term coined by the philologist Max Müller to mean the worship of one god at a time. It is closely related to henotheism. Müller coined the term in reference to the Vedas; where he explained each deity is treated as supreme in turn.

Etymology[edit]

The term kathenotheism, a more specific form of the parent term henotheism, refers to the worship of a succession of supreme gods "one at a time", from the Greek kath' hena "one by one" + theism.[1]

Ancient Greece[edit]

The ancient Orphic religion has a theology comparable to kathenotheism. The Orphic Hymns address each god of the Olympian pantheon as supreme in turn.

Hinduism[edit]

The Smarta sect worship the five major deities as supreme in turn and collectively.

References[edit]