Katuaq

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Katuaq
Katuaq2008.JPG
The undulating perimeter screen
Alternative names Grønlands Kulturhus
General information
Architectural style Modernism
Address Imaneq 21 3900 Nuuk
Town or city Nuuk
Country Greenland
Coordinates 64°10′39″N 51°44′21″W / 64.17750°N 51.73917°W / 64.17750; -51.73917Coordinates: 64°10′39″N 51°44′21″W / 64.17750°N 51.73917°W / 64.17750; -51.73917
Construction started 1994
Completed 1997
Inaugurated February 15, 1997
Client Nuuk Municipality
Technical details
Floor area 4800 square metres
Design and construction
Architect Schmidt Hammer Lassen

Katuaq (Danish: Grønlands Kulturhus) is a cultural centre in Nuuk, Greenland.[1] It is used for concerts, exhibitions, conferences, and as a cinema. Designed by Schmidt Hammer Lassen, it was constructed as a joint project of the Greenland Home Rule Government, the Nuuk Municipal Council and the Nordic Council of Ministers and was inaugurated on 15 February 1997.[2]

Building[edit]

Katuaq is an L-shaped building with an undulating, backward-leaning screen facing onto Nuuk's central urban space. It is raised above the ground and clad in golden larch wood on both the inside and outside. The screen is inspired by the northern lights. [3] This second skin also creates a contrast to the building proper. Between the perimeter screen and the core building lies the large foyer with three white freestanding elements in the shape of a triangle, square and circle.

Facilities[edit]

Katuaq contains two auditoria, the larger one seating 1,008 people and the smaller one 508. The big auditorium is used for concerts, theatre, conferences, and as a cinema. The complex also contains an art school, library, meeting facilities, administrative offices and a café.

Nuuk Center, the country's first shopping mall, is located right next door.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About Katuaq: Welcome". Katuaq. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  2. ^ "About Katuaq: The Building". Katuaq. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  3. ^ "Katuaq Culture Centre". MIMOA. Retrieved 23 June 2009. 

External links[edit]