Kazuyo Sejima

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Kazuyo Sejima
Kazuyo Sejima mg 4973-small.jpg
Born 1956 (age 57–58)
Ibaraki prefecture, Japan
Nationality Japanese
Awards Schelling Architekturpreis 2000
Rolf Schock Prize 2005
Pritzker Prize 2010
Practice Kazuyo Sejima and Associates (1987–1995)
SANAA (since 1995)

Kazuyo Sejima (妹島 和世 Sejima Kazuyo?, born 1956, Ibaraki prefecture, Japan) is a Japanese architect. After studying at Japan Women's University and working at the office of Toyo Ito, in 1987, she founded Kazuyo Sejima and Associates. In 1995, she founded the Tokyo-based firm SANAA (Sejima and Nishizawa and Associates) together with her former employee Ryue Nishizawa. In 2010, Sejima was appointed director of architecture sector for the Venice Biennale, which she curated for the 12th Annual International Architecture Exhibition. She was the first woman ever selected for this position. In 2010, she was awarded the Pritzker Prize, together with Ryue Nishizawa.[1]

Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa have worked on several projects in Germany, France, England, the Netherlands, United States, and Spain. Many of their designs like the New Museum in the Bowery District in New York City as well as their Glass Pavilion for the Toledo Museum of Art involve glass and a space open to the world around it. Such design element can be found abundantly in their designs.

Sejima creates her designs with clean modernist elements. They usually include slick, clean, and shiny surfaces made of glass, marble, and metals. She also likes to use squares and cubes, which can be found in her designs in various usages. Large windows allow natural light to enter a space, and make her space be involved with the world which is on the other side of the glass. It is this connection of two spaces from which she draws her inspirations.

Projects by Kazuyo Sejima and Associates[edit]

Police Office in Chofu Station (1993–94)
  • Platform I Vacation House – 1987 to 1988 – Chiba, Japan
  • Platform II Studio – 1988 to 1990 – Yamanachi, Japan
  • Platform III House (Not Built/Project Only) – 1989 to 1990 – Tokyo, Japan
  • Castelbajac Sports Store – 1990 to 1991 – Kanagawa, Japan
  • Saishunkan Seiyaku Women's Dormitory – 1990 to 1991 – Kumamoto, Japan
  • N House – 1990 to 1992 – Kumamoto, Japan
  • An Apartment Building (Not Built/Project Only) – 1991 – Osaka, Japan
  • Nasumoahara Harmony Hall (Not Built/Project Only) – 1991 – Tochigi, Japan
  • Pachinko Parlor I – 1991 to 1993 – Ibaraki, Japan
  • Villa in the Forest – 1992 to 1994 – Nagano, Japan
  • Pachinko Parlor II – 1993 – Ibaraki, Japan
  • Y House – 1993 to 1994 – Chiba, Japan
  • Police Office in Chofu Station – 1993 to 1994 – Tokyo, Japan
  • Service Center at the Tokyo Expo 96 (Not Built/Project Only) – 1994 to 1995 – Tokyo, Japan
  • Yokohama International Port Terminal (Not Built/Project Only) – 1994 – Kanagawa, Japan
  • Gifu Kitagata Apartment Building – 1994 to 2000 – Gifu, Japan
  • Pachinko Parlor III – 1995 to 1996 – Ibaraki, Japan
  • U Office Building – 1996 to 1998 – Ibaraki, Japan
  • Small House – 1999 to 2000 – Tokyo, Japan
  • Kozankaku Student Residence – 1999 to 2000 – Ibaraki, Japan
  • hhstyle.com Store – 1999 to 2000 – Tokyo, Japan
  • Asahi Shimbun Yamagata Office Building – 2000 to 2002 – Yamagata, Japan
  • House in a Plum Grove – 2001 to 2003 – Tokyo, Japan
  • Onishi Civic Center – 2003 to 2005 – Gunma, Japan
  • Theater and Artscentre- 2007 – Almere, The Netherlands
  • New Museum - 2010- New York City, United States
  • Shibaura House - 2011 - Tokyo, Japan
  • Louvre-Lens - 2012 - Lens, France

Professorship[edit]

Sejima teaches as a Visiting Professor, both at Tama Art University and Japan Women's University in Tokyo. From 2005 to 2008, together with Nishizawa, she held the Jean Labatut Professorship at the School of Architecture at Princeton University, where she also served on the advisory council for several years.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pritzker Prize 2010 Media Kit, retrieved 29 March 2010

External links[edit]