Keith Dayton

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Keith W. Dayton
Born (1949-03-07) March 7, 1949 (age 65)
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1970 - 2010
Rank Lieutenant General
Commands held HHB, 1st Battalion, 84th Field Artillery, 9th Infantry Division
C Battery, 1st Battalion, 84th Field Artillery, 9th Infantry Division
4th Battalion, 29th Field Artillery, 8th Infantry Division
Division Artillery, 3rd Infantry Division
Deputy Director, Human Intelligence, Defense Intelligence Agency
Director, Iraq Survey Group
Battles/wars Operation Iraqi Freedom
Awards Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Distinguished Service Medal
Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit

Lieutenant General Keith W. Dayton, (b. 1949) United States Army, is the director of the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. Dayton completed his term as the U.S. Security Coordinator for Israel-Palestinian Authority in Tel Aviv, Israel in October 2010. He has also served as the Director of the Iraq Survey Group, as a senior member of the Joint Staff, and as U.S. Defense Attache in the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, Russia.

Career Summary[edit]

After graduating from the College of William & Mary in 1970, Lt. Gen. Dayton was immediately commissioned as an artillery officer through the Reserve Officer Training Corps. Prior to his current assignment, he spent 37 years in a variety of command and staff assignments, most recently serving as the director of the Iraq Survey Group during Operation Iraqi Freedom and as Director of Strategy, Plans and Policy, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3, United States Army, before his current assignment as U.S. Security Coordinator for Israel and the Palestinian Authority.

Other key assignments include deputy director for Politico-Military Affairs, Joint Staff; United States Defense Attaché, Moscow, Russia; senior Army fellow on the Council on Foreign Relations, New York; commander, Division Artillery, 3rd Infantry Division (Mechanized), Germany; and commander, 4th Battalion, 29th Field Artillery; 8th Infantry Division (Mechanized), Germany.

He has written many technical articles over the course of his career, as well as was one of the co-authors of The Future of NATO: Facing an Unreliable Enemy in an Uncertain Environment, a study on the future of NATO published in 1991.

Lt. Gen. Dayton served five years as the United States Security Coordinator (USSC) for Israel and the Palestinian Authority. His leadership of the USSC team included overseeing the training of Palestinian Authority forces. He left Israel in October 2010 and retired from the military in December 2010.[1][2]

Dates of Rank[edit]

Medals & Decorations[edit]

Formal Education[edit]

Military Education[edit]

  • Field Artillery Officer Basic Course - Ft. Sill, Oklahoma
  • Infantry Officer Advanced Course - Ft. Benning, Georgia (June 1977 - December 1977)
  • U.S. Army Command & General Staff College - Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas (August 1981 - June 1982)
  • Senior Service College Fellowship - Harvard University - Cambridge, Massachusetts (August 1989 - June 1990)
  • Foreign area officer Course - Ft. Bragg, North Carolina (January 1978 - June 1978)
  • Basic Russian Language Course - Defense Language Institute, Presidio of Monterey, California (June 1978 - June 1979)
  • Soviet Union Foreign Area Officer Overseas Training Program - U.S. Army Russian Institute, Germany (June 1979 - July 1981)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • [1]
  • [2]
  • [3]
  • [4]
  • Roy J. Panzarella, Ph.D. dissertation, University of Oklahoma (2006), Strategic Beacon in the Fog of Leadership: A Case Study of the Executive Military Leadership of the Iraq Study Group (which includes the official U.S. Army career summary of LTG Dayton to 2006)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Issacharoff, Avi (October 8, 2010). "Keith Dayton to retire after five years of training PA forces". Ha'aretz. Retrieved 31 October 2010. 
  2. ^ Thrall, Nathan (October 14, 2010). "Our Man in Palestine". New York Review of Books. Retrieved 31 October 2010.