Keith Dodgshun

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The Honourable
Keith Dodgshun
13th Deputy Premier of Victoria
In office
27 June 1950 – 28 October 1952
Premier John McDonald
Preceded by Trevor Oldham
Succeeded by Alexander Dennett
In office
31 October 1952 – 17 December 1952
Preceded by Alexander Dennett
Succeeded by Bill Galvin
Member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly
for Ouyen
In office
5 May 1938 – 3 October 1945
Preceded by Albert Bussau
Succeeded by District abolished
Member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly
for Rainbow
In office
10 November 1945 – 22 April 1955
Preceded by District created
Succeeded by District abolished
Personal details
Born (1893-07-31)31 July 1893
Hawthorn, Victoria
Died 12 May 1971(1971-05-12) (aged 77)
Hopetoun, Victoria, Australia
Political party Country Party
Spouse(s) Dorothy Lilian Gulliver (m. 1925)
Occupation Wheat farmer
Religion Baptist
Military service
Allegiance Australia
Service/branch Australian Imperial Force
Years of service 1917–1919
Rank Gunner
Unit 1st Field Artillery Brigade
Battles/wars World War I

Keith Dodgshun (31 July 1893 – 12 May 1971) was a politician in Victoria, Australia. He was a member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly for just under 17 years, representing the electorates of Ouyen and Rainbow for the Country Party from 1938 to 1955.

Early life[edit]

Dodgshun was born in the inner Melbourne suburb of Hawthorn to warehouse manager Frederick William Dodgshun and his English wife Rosa May Russell. He was educated at Camberwell Grammar School and the Burnley Agricultural College. He managed his family's property at Mount Egerton for several years before enlisting in the army.[1]

Military service[edit]

Dodgshun enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 7 November 1917,[2] He was assigned to the 1st Field Artillery Brigade and stationed in France and Belgium during World War I.[1] He was discharged from the army on 31 March 1919.[2]

On his return to Australia, Dodgshun settled in Hopetoun where he worked in the soldier settlement scheme.[1]

Political career[edit]

In 1922, Dodgshun joined the United Country Party and became president of the party's Hopetoun branch. From 1933 to 1938, he was a local councillor in the Shire of Karkarooc, until he nominated for election to the lower house of the Victorian state parliament.[1][3]

Dodgshun was elected unopposed to the Victorian Legislative Assembly as the only candidate to nominate for the vacancy in Ouyen caused by the departure of Albert Bussau who had resigned to become Victoria's Agent-General in London, so the by-election scheduled for 5 May 1938 was not held.[4]

Dodgshun was first made a minister when he was made Chief Secretary in Thomas Hollway's first ministry, until the coalition between the Liberal and Country parties was dissolved after a dispute between Hollway and Country leader John McDonald.[5]

On 27 June 1950, with the support of the Labor Party, McDonald overthrew Hollway's government and was appointed Premier of Victoria. Dodgshun was made Deputy Premier, Chief Secretary, Minister-in-Charge of Electrical Undertakings and Minister-in-Charge of Immigration. Hollway briefly regained power from 28 to 31 October 1952 as an independent Premier, but his commission was withdrawn by the Governor of Victoria and Dodgshun regained his ministries in McDonald's cabinet, however McDonald was defeated by John Cain's Labor Party less than two months later at the Victorian state election, 1952.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Dodgshun, Keith, Re-member (Parliament of Victoria), 1985.
  2. ^ a b Dodds to Dodman, World War I Nominal Roll, Australian War Memorial.
  3. ^ "Ouyen Seat.". The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) (Melbourne, Vic.: National Library of Australia). 11 February 1938. p. 12. Retrieved 13 March 2013. 
  4. ^ "ELECTED UNOPPOSED.". Recorder (Port Pirie, SA : 1919 - 1954) (Port Pirie, SA: National Library of Australia). 6 May 1938. p. 3. Retrieved 13 March 2013. 
  5. ^ a b B. J. Costar, 'Dodgshun, Keith (1893–1971)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, accessed 13 March 2013.
Victorian Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Albert Bussau
Member for Ouyen
1938–1945
District abolished
District created Member for Rainbow
1945–1955
District abolished
Political offices
Preceded by
Bill Slater
Chief Secretary
1947–1948
Succeeded by
Wilfrid Kent Hughes
Preceded by
Trevor Oldham
Deputy Premier of Victoria
1950–1952
Succeeded by
Alexander Dennett
Chief Secretary
1950–1952
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Maltby
Minister-in-Charge of Electrical Undertakings
1950–1952
Succeeded by
Raymond Tovell
New ministry Minister-in-Charge of Immigration
1950–1952
Ministry suspended
Preceded by
Alexander Dennett
Deputy Premier of Victoria
1952
Succeeded by
Bill Galvin
Chief Secretary
1952
Preceded by
Raymond Tovell
Minister in Charge of Electrical Undertakings
1952
Succeeded by
John Galbally
Ministry suspended Minister-in-Charge of Immigration
1952
Succeeded by
Bill Slater