Keith Dowding

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For the Australian Presbyterian minister and Labor activist, see Keith Dowding (activist).
Keith Dowding
Keith Dowding in 2007.JPG
Keith Dowding
Born (1960-05-06) 6 May 1960 (age 54)
Nationality British
Institution Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Field Political science
Alma mater Nuffield College, Oxford University

Keith Martin Dowding (born 6 May 1960),[1] is Professor of Political Science in Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia arriving from the London School of Economics, UK in 2007. He has published widely in the fields of public choice, public administration, public policy, British politics, comparative politics, urban political economy, positive political theory and normative political philosophy. His work is informed by social and rational choice theories. He has been one of the editors of The Journal of Theoretical Politics (Sage) since 1996.

Early life[edit]

Downling obtained his BA in Philosophy and Politics from Keele University in 1982, and a DPhil from Nuffield College, Oxford University in 1987.[2]

Introduction to works[edit]

Keith Dowding is unusual in that he has influentially written in both political philosophy and mainstream empirical political science. Dowding is best known for his work on 'power', applying insights from formal analysis to central debates on the nature of power and structure of power in society. Expanding on Brian Barry's concept of 'luck' (getting what you want without trying) he argues that some groups of people are 'systematically lucky' in that they are advantaged because of the way society is structured. Such people are not powerful in the sense they have resources that they could use that other groups do not (though they might have this power 'as well') but rather systematically lucky in that they tend to get what they want without having to do anything. Alternatively, other groups are systematically unlucky. This argument has caused great controversy with critics including Brian Barry, Steven Lukes, Peter Morriss and more recently Andrew Hindmoor.

Dowding has also worked extensively on the Tiebout model of individuals moving location to get the local services they require, showing that such moving does occur in the UK though only to a small extent, and that people tend to move 'to' areas for service reasons, but do not decide to leave 'from' areas for those reasons. He has extended this work into examining Albert Hirschman's 'Exit, Voice and Loyalty' model and has a forthcoming Cambridge University Press book Exits, Voices and Social Investment co-authored with long-time collaborator Peter John extending and applying Hirschman's model to citizen satisfaction with government services.

More recently his work has examined why UK cabinet ministers resign based on a large dataset of all UK ministerial resignations and non-resignations, and compiled another on Australia. Following his lead similar datasets are being compiled by scholars all round the world for intensive comparative analysis.

Recent activity[edit]

Recently Dowding left LSE and joined the political science programme in the Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University (ANU) as a Research Professor of Political Science in July 2007 moving to the School of Politics and International Relations when the Arts Faculty coalesced with the Research School. He is the Chair of a network of scholars Selection and De-selection of Political Elites (SEDEPE) who are interested in the career paths of political elites http://sedepe.net/.

The Careers of Cabinet Ministers[edit]

This project comes under the rubric of SEDEPE. Dowding’s work so far has largely been concerned with ministers in the British Cabinet and thus far largely concerned with their resignations. But now he is working to extend this work into the careers of ministers more broadly, and to extend its scope beyond the UK most notably into ministers in the Australian states and Commonwealth government. Publications from this project include the following:

Analytical Account of Freedom and Rights[edit]

This is a joint work in collaboration with Martin van Hees. The object is to complete a book on the measurement of freedom and rights. Publications from this project include the following:

Reprinted in Matravers, Matt; Meyer, Lukas (2011). Democracy, equality, and justice. London: Routledge. ISBN 9780415592925. 

Work on Amartya Sen[edit]

Dowding is fascinated by empirical measurement of freedom and rights. He has worked as part of a team led by Paul Anand, Open University, UK. They have been empirically examining Amartya Sen's capability approach through survey data ('Capabilities and Well-Being: Operationalizing the Capabilities Framework'). This research was supported by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Board. Currently he is writing a book on the works of Amartya Sen which is expected to be published soon.

  • Dowding, Keith (2009), "What is welfare and how might it be measured?", in Kincaid, Harold; Ross, Don, The Oxford handbook of philosophy of economics, Oxford New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 511–539, ISBN 9780195189254. 

Publications[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Dowding, Keith M. (1991). Rational choice and political power. Aldershot, Hampshire, England Brookfield, Vermont, USA: Edward Elgar. ISBN 9781852783358. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1995). The civil service. London New York: Routledge. ISBN 9780415075688. 
  • Dowding, Keith; King, Desmond (1995). Preferences, institutions, and rational choice. Oxford New York: Clarendon Press Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780198278955. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1996). Power. Minneapolis, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press (series: Concepts in the Social Sciences). ISBN 9780816629404. 
  • Dowding, Keith; de Wispelaere, Jurgen; White, Stuart (2003). The ethics of stakeholding. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 9781403905802. 
  • Dowding, Keith; Pateman, Carole; Goodin, Robert E. (2004). Justice and democracy: essays for Brian Barry. Cambridge New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521836951. 
  • Dowding, Keith; Dumont, Patrick (2009). The selection of ministers in Europe: hiring and firing. London New York: Routledge. ISBN 9780415430814. 
  • Dowding, Keith; Dewan, Torun; Shepsle, Kenneth A. (2009). Rational choice politics (4 volume set). London: Sage Library of Political Science. ISBN 9781412945028. 
Volume I: Social choice, equilibrium and electoral systems
Volume II: Voting, elections and pressure politics
Volume III: Legislatures
Volume IV: Bureaucracy, constitutional arrangements and the state
  • Dowding, Keith (2011). Encyclopedia of power. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publishing. ISBN 9781412927482. 
  • Dowding, Keith; Berlinski, Samuel; Dewan, Torun (2012). Accounting for ministers: scandal and survival in British government, 1945-2007. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521519724. 

Chapters in books[edit]

  • Dowding, Keith (1992), "Unit 22: running the civil service", in Cochrane, Allan, Running the country, units 20-25, case studies: 3, Milton Keynes: Open University, pp. 89–120, ISBN 9780749200695. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1993), "Government at the centre", in Dunleavy, Patrick; Gamble, Andrew; Holliday, Ian et al., Developments in British politics 4, New York: St. Martin's Press, pp. 175–193, ISBN 9780312100872. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1993), "Managing the civil service", in Thompson, Grahame; Maidment, Richard A., Managing the UK: an introduction to its political economy and public policy, London: Sage, pp. 236–257, ISBN 9780803988514. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1994), "Institutional persistence and change at the core of British government", in Kastendiek, Hans; Stinshoff, Richard, Changing conceptions of constitutional government: developments in British politics and the constitutional debate since the 1960s, Bochum: Universitätsverlag Brockmeyer, pp. 95–113, ISBN 9783819602443. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1994), "Policy networks: don't take a good idea too far", in Dunleavy, Patrick; Stanyer, Jeffrey, Contemporary political studies, 1994 1, Belfast: Political Studies Association of the United Kingdom, ISBN 9780952315001. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1994), "Rational mobilization", in Dunleavy, Patrick; Stanyer, Jeffrey, Contemporary political studies, 1994 2, Belfast: Political Studies Association of the United Kingdom, ISBN 9780952315018. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1995), "Introduction", in Dowding, Keith; King, Desmond, Preferences, institutions, and rational choice, Oxford New York: Clarendon Press Oxford University Press, pp. 1–19, ISBN 9780198278955. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1995), "Interpreting formal coalition theory", in Dowding, Keith; King, Desmond, Preferences, institutions, and rational choice, Oxford New York: Clarendon Press Oxford University Press, pp. 43–59, ISBN 9780198278955. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1996), "Public choice and local governance", in Stoker, Gerry; King, Desmond, Rethinking local democracy, Government Beyond the Centre, Basingstoke, England: Macmillan In association with the Economic & Social Research Council Local Programme, pp. 91–116, ISBN 9780333638538. 
  • Dowding, Keith; Dunleavy, Patrick (1996), "Production, disursement and consumption: the modes and modalities of goods and services", in Edgell, Stephen; Hetherington, Kevin; Warde, Alan, Consumption matters: the production and experience of consumption, Oxford, England Cambridge, Massachusetts: Blackwell, pp. 36–65, ISBN 9780631203506. 
  • Dowding, Keith (1998), "Secession and isolation", in Lehning, Percy B., Theories of secession, London New York: Routledge, pp. 71–91, ISBN 9780415171922. 
  • Dowding, Keith; Kang, Won-Taek (Autumn 1998). "Ministerial resignations 1945–97". Public Administration (Wiley) 76 (3): 411–429. doi:10.1111/1467-9299.00109. 
  • Dowding, Keith (2000), "Model or metaphor? A critical review of the policy network approach", in Rhodes, R. A. W., The International Library of Politics and Comparative Government: United Kingdom 1, Aldershot, Hants, England: Brookfield, Vermont Ashgate/Dartmouth, pp. 173–195, ISBN 9781840140453. 
  • Dowding, Keith (2000), "Model or metaphor? A critical review of the policy network approach", in Dunleavy, Patrick; Kelly, Paul; Moran, Michael, British political science: fifty years of political studies, Oxford: Political Studies Association Blackwell, pp. 196–213, ISBN 9780631224129. 
This chapter is an abridged version of: Dowding, Keith (August 1995). "Model or metaphor? A critical review of the policy network approach". Political Studies (Wiley) 43 (s1): 136–158. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9248.1995.tb01705.x. 
  • Dowding, Keith; Dunleavy, Patrick; King, Desmond (2000), "Understanding urban governance: the contribution of rational choice", in Stoker, Gerry, The new politics of British local governance, New York: St. Martin's Press, pp. 91–116, ISBN 9780333728185. 
  • Dowding, Keith; Hughes, James; Margetts, Helen (2001), "Introduction", in Dowding, Keith; Hughes, James; Margetts, Helen, Challenges to democracy: ideas, involvement, and institutions, The Political Studies Association Yearbook 2000, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire New York: Palgrave, pp. xi–xvii, ISBN 9780333789827. 
  • Dowding, Keith (2002), "Model or metaphor? A critical review of the policy network approach", in Scott, John, Social networks: critical concepts in sociology volume 4 - applications: political protest and policy networks, London New York: Routledge, ISBN 9780415251112. 
  • Dowding, Keith (2002), "Rational choice and institutional change: an overview of current theories", in Steunenberg, Bernard, Widening the European Union: the politics of institutional change and reform, London New York: Routledge, pp. 21–38, ISBN 9780415268356. 
  • Dowding, Keith (2003), "The civil service", in Hollowell, Jonathan, Britain since 1945, Making Contemporary Britain, Malden, Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishers, pp. 179–193, ISBN 9780631209683. 
  • Dowding, Keith (2003), "Rational choice and trust", in King, Preston, Trusting in reason: Martin Hollis and the philosophy of social action, London Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass Publishers, pp. 205–218, ISBN 9780714684000. 
This chapter is a reprint of: Dowding, Keith (2001). "Rational choice and trust". Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy, special issue: Trusting in Reason: Martin Hollis and the Philosophy of Social Action (Taylor and Francis) 4 (4): 207–220. doi:10.1080/13698230108403372. 
  • Dowding, Keith; de Wispelaere, Jurgen; White, Stuart (2003), "Stakeholding - a new paradigm in social policy", in Dowding, Keith; de Wispelaere, Jurgen; White, Stuart, The ethics of stakeholding, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 1–28, ISBN 9781403905802. 
  • Dowding, Keith; Pateman, Carole; Goodin, Robert E. (2004), "Introduction: between justice and democracy", in Dowding, Keith; Pateman, Carole; Goodin, Robert E., Justice and democracy: essays for Brian Barry, Cambridge New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1–24, ISBN 9780521836951. 
  • Dowding, Keith (2004), "Are democratic and just institutions the same?", in Dowding, Keith; Pateman, Carole; Goodin, Robert E., Justice and democracy: essays for Brian Barry, Cambridge New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 25–39, ISBN 9780521836951. 
  • Dowding, Keith (2004), "Rational choice approaches to analyzing power", in Nash, Kate; Scott, Alan, The Blackwell companion to political sociology (2nd ed.), Malden, Massachusetts: Blackwell, pp. 29–39, ISBN 9781405122658. 
  • Dowding, Keith; McLeay, Elizabeth (2011), "The firing line: when and why do prime ministers fire ministerial colleagues?", in 't Hart, Paul; Uhr, John, How power changes hands: transition and succession in government, Understanding Governance, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 157–173, ISBN 9780230242968. 
  • Dowding, Keith (2011), Matravers, Matt; Meyer, Lukas, eds., Democracy, equality, and justice, London: Routledge, ISBN 9780415592925. 

Journal articles[edit]

This article was a response to: Barry, Brian (June 2002). "Capitalists rule ok? Some puzzles about power". Politics, Philosophy and Economics (Sage) 1 (2): 155–184. doi:10.1177/1470594X02001002001. 
Brian Barry replied to Dowding's article with this further article: Barry, Brian (October 2003). "Capitalists rule. OK? A commentary on Keith Dowding". Politics, Philosophy and Economics (Sage) 2 (3): 323–341. doi:10.1177/1470594X030023003. 
This article was a response to: Marsh, David; Smith, Martin John; Richards, David (July 2000). "Bureaucrats, politicians and reform in Whitehall: analysing the bureau-shaping model". British Journal of Political Science (Cambridge Journals) 30 (3): 461–482. doi:10.1017/s0007123400000193. 
This article was a response to: Parsons, Stephen (May 2006). "The rationality of voting: a response to Dowding". The British Journal of Politics & International Relations (Wiley) 8 (2): 295–298. doi:10.1111/j.1467-856X.2006.00215.x. 
Parsons article was a response to this original article: Dowding, Keith (August 2005). "Is it rational to vote? Five types of answer and a suggestion". The British Journal of Politics & International Relations (Wiley) 7 (3): 442–459. doi:10.1111/j.1467-856X.2005.00188.x. 
This article was a response to: Kay, Adrian; Marsh, Alex (June 2007). "The methodology of the public choice research programme: the case of "voting with feet"". New Political Economy (Taylor and Francis) 12 (2): 167–183. doi:10.1080/13563460701302943. 
Kay and Marsh replied to Dowding's article with this further article: Kay, Adrian; Marsh, Alex (September 2008). "On the tenacity of tiebout: a response to Dowding". New Political Economy (Taylor and Francis) 13 (3): 349–355. doi:10.1080/13563460802302636. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dowding, Keith M.". Library of Congress. Retrieved 23 September 2014. data sheet (Dowding, Keith Martin; b. 05-06-1960) 
  2. ^ "Professor Keith Dowding". Australian National University. Retrieved 13 April 2014. 

External links[edit]