Keith Waldrop

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Keith Waldrop in April 2010 at the Literary Arts Program building at Brown University

Keith Waldrop (born December 11, 1932, in Emporia, Kansas) is the author of numerous books of poetry and prose, and has translated the work of Claude Royet-Journoud, Anne-Marie Albiach, and Edmond Jabès, among others. A recent translation is Charles Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal (2006). Mr. Waldrop received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1964.

With his wife Rosmarie Waldrop, he co-edits Burning Deck Press. He lives in Providence, Rhode Island, and is professor emeritus at Brown University. The French government has named him Chevalier des arts et des lettres.[citation needed]

Awards and honors[edit]

Selected works[edit]

Poetry[edit]

  • A Windmill Near Calvary (University of Michigan Press, 1968)
  • The Garden of Effort (Burning Deck, 1975)
  • Shipwreck In Haven (Awede, 1989)
  • The Opposite of Letting the Mind Wander (Lost Roads, 1990)
  • The Locality Principle (Avec, 1995)
  • Analogies of Escape (Burning Deck, 1997)
  • The Silhouette of the Bridge (Memory Stand-Ins) (Avec, 1997)
  • Stone Angels (Instress, 1997)
  • Well Well Reality (Collaborations with Rosmarie Waldrop) (The Post-Apollo Press, 1998)
  • Haunt (Instance, 2000)
  • Semiramis If I Remember (Avec, 2001)
  • The House Seen from Nowhere (Litmus Press, 2003)
  • The Real Subject: queries and Conjectures of Jacob Delafon, with Sample Poems (Omnidawn Publishing, 2005)
  • Several Gravities (Siglio, 2009)
  • Transcendental Studies: A Trilogy (University of California Press, 2009) —winner of the National Book Award[1]
  • The Space of Half an Hour (Burning Deck, 1983)

Prose[edit]

  • Hegel's Family (Station Hill, 1989)
  • Light While There is Light (Sun & Moon, 1993)

Visual Art[edit]

  • Several Gravities (Siglio Press, 2009)

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Book Awards – 2009". National Book Foundation. Retrieved 2012-04-08.
    (With acceptance speech, interview, and other material; and essay by Ross Gay from the Awards 60-year anniversary blog.)
  2. ^ Chad W. Post (April 28, 2014). "BTBA 2014: Poetry and Fiction Winners". Three Percent. Retrieved April 28, 2014. 

External links[edit]