Kelly Cherry

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kelly Cherry
KellyPhoto1.jpg
Born Kelly Cherry
(1940-12-21) 21 December 1940 (age 73)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, US
Occupation Poet, author, essayist
Nationality United States
Alma mater University of Mary Washington
University of Virginia
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Notable work(s) A Kind of Dream
Girl in a Library: On Women Writers & the Writing Life
Hazard and Prospect: New and Selected Poems
The Retreats of Thought
Notable award(s) Poet Laureate of Virginia (2010–12)
Spouse(s) Burke Davis III

Kelly Cherry (born December 21, 1940) is an award winning author, poet, and the former Poet Laureate of Virginia (2010–2012).[1] A resident of Halifax, Virginia, she was named the state's Poet Laureate by Governor Bob McDonnell in July 2010.[2] She succeeded Claudia Emerson in this post (Poet Laureate of Virginia, 2008–2010).[3]

Literary themes and styles[edit]

Award-winning poet and novelist Kelly Cherry is concerned with philosophy; with, as she explains it, "the becoming-aware of abstraction in real life--since, in order to abstract, you must have something to abstract from." Within her novels, the abstract notions of morality become her focus: "My novels deal with moral dilemmas and the shapes they create as they reveal themselves in time," she once told CA. "My poems seek out the most suitable temporal or kinetic structure for a given emotion." Writing in the Dictionary of Literary Biography Yearbook: 1983 on Cherry's fiction, Mark Harris concluded that "she manages to capture, in very readable stories, the indecisiveness and mute desperation of life in the twentieth century."

From the beginning of her career, Cherry has written both formal verse and free verse. According to the citation preceding her receipt of the James G. Hanes Poetry Prize by the Fellowship of Southern Writers in 1989, "Her poetry is marked by a firm intellectual passion, a reverent desire to possess the genuine thought of our century, historical, philosophical, and scientific, and a species of powerful ironic wit which is allied to rare good humor." Reviewing Relativity, Patricia Goedicke noted in Three Rivers Poetry Journal that "her familiarity with the demands and pressures of traditional patterns has resulted...in an expansion and deepening of her poetic resources, a carefully textured over- and underlay of image, meaning and diction." Mark Harris felt that Cherry's "ability to sustain a narrative by clustering and repeating images [lends] itself to longer forms, and 'A Bird's Eye View of Einstein,' the longest poem in [Relativity], is an example of Cherry at her poetic best." Reviewing Cherry's collection, Death and Transfiguration, Patricia Gabilondo wrote in The Anglican Theological Review that "the abstract prose poem 'Requiem' that closes this book...translates personal loss into the historical and universal, providing an occasion for philosophical meditation on the mystery of suffering and the need for transcendence in a post-Holocaust world that seems to offer none. Moving through the terrors of nihilism and doubt, Cherry, in a poem that deftly alternates between the philosophically abstract and the image's graphic force, gives us an intellectually honest and deeply moving vision of our relation to each other's suffering and of God's relation to humanity's 'memory of pain'."[4]

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Kelly was born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but moved to Ithaca, New York at age 5, and Chesterfield County, Virginia, at age 9.

Early career[edit]

Virginia Poets Laureate at University of Mary Washington Reunion Day, June 3, 2011. Carolyn Kreiter-Foronda (2006-2008), Claudia Emerson (2008-2010) and Kelly Cherry (2010-2012)[5]

Cherry graduated from the University of Mary Washington in 1961, did graduate work at the University of Virginia as a Du Pont Fellow, and received a Masters of Fine Arts from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. After working in publishing for some years, she accepted a position at Southwest Minnesota State College. She began teaching at the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1977.[6][7] Kelly Cherry is the Eudora Welty Professor Emerita of English and Evjue-Bascom Professor Emerita in the Humanities[8] at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.[9]

Later career[edit]

She retired in 1999, after 22 years (23 in Madison), and in retirement continues to hold those titles while also holding named chairs and distinguished writer positions at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (Eminent Scholar), Colgate University, Mercer University, Atlantic Center for the Arts, and Hollins University.

She has received numerous literary and academic honors. Cherry continues to give numerous public and private readings, often teaming with other notable Poets Laureate of Virginia such as Claudia Emerson and Carolyn Kreiter-Foronda.

She has published reviews widely, including for the NYT, the LA Times, the Chicago Book Review, the Minneapolis paper, the Hollins Critic, America magazine, the Women's Review of Books, the London Independent, and others.

Personal life[edit]

Kelly Cherry is married to Burke Davis III; together they live on a small rural farm in central Virginia.

Teaching positions in retirement[edit]

While at U of Wisconsin[edit]

Other positions and posts include[edit]

  • Member, Electorate, Cathedral of St. John the Divine, NYC (five-year term beginning 2009; extended to 2016)
  • Associated Writing Programs Board of Directors (1990–93)
  • Discipline Advisory Committee for Fulbright Awards (1991–94)
  • Advisory Editor, Shenandoah (1988–92)
  • Contributing Editor, The Hollins Critic (1996–present)

Published works[edit]

Kelly Cherry has written over 25 fiction, poetry, and non-fiction books, nine chapbooks and two translations of classical plays.[10][11]

Fiction[edit]

  • A Kind of Dream. Interlinked short stories, U. of Wisconsin Press, spring 2014. ISBN 978-0299297602
  • The Woman Who. Boson Books (2010), Bitingduck Press. Short stories.
  • My Life and Dr. Joyce Brothers. A novel in stories. Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, (1990); reprinted by University of Alabama Press, (2002).[12]
  • In the Wink of an Eye. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. 1983. ; LSU Press, 2004, ISBN 978-0-8071-2966-1[13]
  • Sick and Full of Burning, Viking Press (1974); Ballantine (1975); reprinted by Boson Books(1995)[14]
  • The Lost Traveller's Dream, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, (1984)[15]
  • Augusta Played, Houghton Mifflin, (1979), ISBN 978-0-395-27573-3; Louisiana State University Press, (1984),[16] Dzanc e-Print edition (2013)
  • We Can Still Be Friends, Soho Press, (2003) hardback; (2004) trade paper, ISBN 978-1-56947-323-8[17] author's title: <American Minuet>
  • The Society of Friends: Stories, University of Missouri Press, (1999)[18]
  • Conversion, Treacle Press, (1979)[19]

Nonfiction[edit]

  • The Exiled Heart. LSU Press. 1991. ISBN 978-0-8071-1620-3. 
  • The Globe and the Brain: On Place in Fiction, Talking River Publications, Lewis-Clark State College, (2006)[20]
  • Writing the World. University of Missouri Press. 1995. [21]
  • History, Passion, Freedom, Death, and Hope: Prose about Poetry, University of Tampa Press, (2005)[22]
  • The Poem: An Essay, Sandhills Press, 1999
  • Girl in a Library: On Women Writers and the Writing Life, BkMk Press/University of Missouri-Kansas City, 2009, ISBN 978-1-886157-66-8

Poetry[edit]

Other[edit]

  • A Kelly Cherry Reader, f/c Stephen F. Austin State University Press, fall 2014

Translations[edit]

  • Antigone (trans.), in Sophocles, 2, ed. by Slavitt and Bovie
  • Octavia (trans.), in Seneca: The Tragedies, Vol. 2, ed. Slavitt and Bovie

Publications in Prize Anthologies[edit]

Publications in Anthologies[edit]

  • Poetry, fiction, and nonfiction in over 300 anthologies.

Honors, awards and fellowships[edit]

Honors[edit]

Awards[edit]

  • 2013 L. E. Phillabaum Poetry Award
  • 2012 Carole Weinstein Poetry Prize
  • 2012 Rebecca Mitchell Taramuto Short Fiction Prize for "On Familiar Terms," Blackbird at www.blackbird.vcu.edu
  • 2011 The Bravo!Award by the Chesterfield Public Education Foundation, Chesterfield County Public Schools in Virginia, USA[24]
  • 2010 Finalist, People's Choice Awards, Library of Virginia, for Girl in a Library: On Women Writers & the Writing Life
  • 2010 Director’s Visitor, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey
  • 2010 The Ellen Anderson Award (first recipient) from the Poetry Society of Virginia
  • 2009 Finalist (with Marvin Bell and Mark Jarman) for The Poets' Prize[25]
  • 2009 Finalist, Book of the Year Award, ForeWord Magazine, nonfiction, for Girl in a Library: On Women Writers and the Writing Life
  • 2002 Book of the Year Award by ForeWord Magazine, Silver Prize for Poetry, for Rising Venus.[26]
  • 2000 Bradley Major Achievement Award (Lifetime), Council for Wisconsin Writers
  • 2000 Distinguished Alumnus Award, University of Mary Washington
  • 2000 Dictionary of Literary Biography Award for the best volume of short stories (The Society of Friends: Stories) published in 1999[27]
  • 1999 Leidig Lectureship in Poetry, Emory & Henry College
  • 1992 USIS Arts America Speaker Award (The Philippines). USIS is now called the USIA
  • 1992, 1991 Wisconsin Arts Board New Work Awards
  • 1991 VCCA Writers Exchange Fellow (with Edwin Honig et al.) to Russia (Leningrad, Peredelkino, Yalta)
  • 1991 First Prize for Book-length Fiction, Council for Wisconsin Writers (for My Life and Dr. Joyce Brothers)
  • 1991 Wisconsin Notable Author, Literary Committee of the Wisconsin Library Association[28]
  • 1990, 1987, 1983 PEN Syndicated Fiction Awards
  • 1989 Hanes Poetry Prize[3] given by the Fellowship of Southern Writers for a body of work, first recipient.
  • 1980 First Prize for Book-length Fiction, Council for Wisconsin Writers (for Augusta Played)
  • 1974 Canaras Award for first novel, Sick and Full of Burning[14]

Fellowships[edit]

Articles / Book Reviews / Interviews / Feature Stories about Kelly Cherry[edit]

2009 to present[edit]

  • Elliot, Okla. What Kelly Cherry Knows. "An Embarrassment of Riches". Inside Higher Ed BlogU. Inside the Education of Ornate Churm. August 4, 2011.[30]
  • Alger, Derek. "From the Editor: Interview with Kelly Cherry". PIF Magazine. October 1, 2010.[31]

Poetry Readings[edit]

Kelly travels and gives lectures & poetry readings throughout the state of Virginia and across the United States of America and in Europe. Below is a partial listing:

Recent Readings[edit]

  • Readings in Madison and Waukesha, Wisconsin, November 2014.
  • 13th International Short Story Conference, Vienna, Austria. Reading. Also a panel on story cycles and novels-in-stories. July 15–19.
  • Colgate Writers Conference. Teaching a poetry workshop, giving a fiction reading. Also a craft talk. June 15–21.
  • Signing new book of stories, Winchester Book Gallery, Winchester, VA, June 12, 4 to 6 p.m.
  • Signing new book of stories at Barnes & Noble, Lynchburg, June 7, 3 to 6 p.m.
  • Quail Ridge Book Store, reading, May 7.
  • Poetry and Jazz at Richmond’s Weinstein Jewish Community Center, April 9.
  • Virginia Book Festival, Charlottesville, VA, Panel on George Garrett. With R.H.W. Dillard, Carrie Brown, Casey Clabough. March 21.
  • AWP (Seattle, late February) Panel "Who Exactly Was George Garrett?" With Richard Bausch, Julia Johnson, Casey Clabough et al. Also, signing of new book at U of Wisconsin Press table. Also, panel with Gerry Powell, Clifford Garstang, Xu Xi,et al. about interlinked short story collections and the novel-in-stories.

2013[edit]

  • University of North Carolina-Greensboro, Oct. 25
  • Malaprops, Asheville, N.C.,Oct. 6
  • Library of Virginia, May 9. With Lisa Russ Sparr.
  • Quail Ridge Book Store, March 17, 3 p.m. With Keith Flynn.
  • AWP, Boston, "The Bible and Women," "Smart Girls", March 8 and 9; signing March 9 a.m.

2012[edit]

  • October 26. Book and Author Dinner, Rappahannock Community College campus. Warsaw, VA.
  • October 19–21. James River Poetry Festival, Richmond, Va. Also, Library of Virginia celebration.
  • August 18. Sow's Ear, Winchester, Va.
  • August 12. Reading for VCCA, Washington, D.C.
  • June 27–30. International Short Story Conference. Reading. Little Rock, Arkansas.
  • March 30. Longwood College. Friends of the Library. Farmville, VA.
  • March 28. Blackbird Reading/VCU, Fiction, Richmond.
  • March 21–25. Festival of the Book. Charlottesville, VA[32] Opening Session and reading, March 21.
  • February 29–March 3, 2012. 2012 AWP Annual Conference & Bookfair. Chicago, Illinois.[33] Two Panels.
  • February 16. Newport News. Poetry.

2011[edit]

Readings before Poet Laureate term[edit]

  • Newcastle, UK, Soviet Union, Philippines
  • plus about 300 other readings.

Readings after Poet Laureate term[edit]

Speaker / Workshops / Presentations / Panels[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Virginia Law and Library of Congress List of Poets Laureate of Virginia. Loc.gov. Retrieved on 2011-05-25.
  2. ^ "BR-born poet Kelly Cherry named Virginia Poet Laureate". 2theadvocate. January 23, 2011. Retrieved May 4, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Kelly Cherry named Va. poet laureate". The Washington Post. Associated Press. January 28, 2011. Retrieved May 4, 2011. 
  4. ^ From Gale Contemporary Authors, GALE|H1000017576. Retrieved on May 25, 2011.
  5. ^ Virginia Poets Laureate at the University of Mary Washington Reunion Day, June 3, 2011 Video of Reading at University of Mary Washington
  6. ^ "Biography". Kelly Cherry Books. 2011. Retrieved May 4, 2011. 
  7. ^ "1991 Notable Wisconsin Authors". Wisconsin Library Association. May 12, 2004. Retrieved May 4, 2011. 
  8. ^ University of Wisconsin–Madison ~ Evjue-Bascom Professor Emerita in the Humanities ~ Kelly Cherry. Creativewriting.wisc.edu (2011-02-14). Retrieved on 2011-05-25.
  9. ^ University of Wisconsin–Madison Experts Guide ~ Kelly Cherry. Experts.news.wisc.edu. Retrieved on 2011-05-25.
  10. ^ Library of Congress Online Catalog Publications by Kelly Cherry
  11. ^ "Kelly Cherry". Writers.net. Retrieved May 4, 2011. 
  12. ^ ISBN 978-0-8173-1243-5 My Life and Dr. Joyce Brothers (2002)
  13. ^ "In the Wink of an Eye". Boson Books. 1994. Retrieved May 11, 2011. 
  14. ^ a b ISBN 978-1-886420-16-8 Sick and Full of Burning (1995)
  15. ^ ISBN 978-0-15-153617-7 The Lost Traveller's Dream (1984)
  16. ^ ISBN 978-0-8071-2279-2 Augusta Played (1984)
  17. ^ ISBN 978-1-56947-323-8 We Can Still Be Friends (2003)
  18. ^ ISBN 978-0-8262-1243-6 The Society of Friends: Stories (1999)
  19. ^ ISBN 978-0-914232-28-5 Conversion (1979)
  20. ^ [ ISBN 978-0-911015-54-6] The Globe and the Brain: On Place in Fiction (2006)
  21. ^ [ ISBN 978-0-8262-0992-4] The Globe and the Brain: On Place in Fiction (1995)
  22. ^ [ ISBN 978-1-879852-26-6] History, Passion, Freedom, Death, and Hope: Prose about Poetry (2005)
  23. ^ O. Henry Award 1994 for "Not the Phil Donahue Show" The Virginia Quarterly Review, Summer 1993
  24. ^ "And the 2011 BravoAwards Winners are...". Chesterfield Observer. May 18, 2011. Retrieved May 22, 2011. 
  25. ^ R. S. Gwynn (May 2, 2009). "Ellen Bryant Voigt Wins 2009 Poets' Prize". Ablemuse.com. Retrieved May 22, 2011. 
  26. ^ ForeWord Magazine 'Book of the Year' award, Silver Prize for Poetry, 2002 book: "Rising Venus"
  27. ^ "Awards". Kelly Cherry Books. 2010. Retrieved May 4, 2011. 
  28. ^ Notable Wisconsin Authors. Wisconsin Library Association. www.wlp.org. (pdf) Retrieved on 2011-05-25.
  29. ^ Yaddo List of Artist Fellows ~ Writers. Yaddo.org. Retrieved on 2011-05-25.
  30. ^ "An Embarrassment of Riches" by Okla Elliot. What Kelly Cherry Knows. Inside Higher Ed BlogU. Inside the Education of Ornate Churm. August 4, 2011. interview by Okla Elliot
  31. ^ "From the Editor: Interview with Kelly Cherry" by Derek Alger. PIF Magazine. October 1, 2010. interview by Derek Alger
  32. ^ http://www.vabook.org/index.html/ Festival of the Book 2012
  33. ^ 2012 American Writers and Writing Programs annual Conference 2012
  34. ^ National Book Festival 2011. Washington DC
  35. ^ University of Mary Washington. Three Poets Laureate Special Reading. June 3, 2011. 2:30 - 4:00 pm. Umw.edu. Retrieved on 2011-05-29.
  36. ^ Joaquin Miller Cabin Poetry Series. Summer 2011. Washington DC. Retrieved May 26, 2011. Wordworksdc.com. Retrieved on 2011-05-29.

External links[edit]