Kelo Henderson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kelo Henderson
Born Paul Henderson, Jr.
(1923-08-08) August 8, 1923 (age 90)
Pueblo, Colorado, USA
Nationality American
Occupation Actor: Golden Boot winner

Kelo Henderson (born August 8, 1923) is an American former actor who co-starred as Deputy Clint Travis in the 1957-1959 syndicated western television series 26 Men. The program starred Tristram Coffin (1909-1990) as Captain Thomas H. Rynning, the real-life commander of the Arizona Rangers, the case files of which were the basis for the series.[1]

In 2003, Henderson, along with Chris Alcaide, the Sons of the Pioneers, Kris Kristofferson, and Tommy Lee Jones, received the Golden Boot Award for his work in westerns.[2]

Born as Paul Henderson, Jr., in Pueblo, Colorado, Henderson was reared on a ranch and became an expert marksman and trick gun artist. He is a former ranch foreman. As an actor, he taught many of his peers how to use their guns on screen.[3] Henderson appeared in twenty-five of the seventy-eight episodes of 26 Men, including the premier episode "The Recruit", "Trade Me Deadly", "Legacy of Death", "The Bells of St. Thomas", "Wayward Gun", and "The Last Rebellion".[4]

Henderson's first screen appearance was as Doc Pardes in the 1957 episode "The Brand" of the ABC western Cheyenne, starring Clint Walker. In 1957, he played the role of Ike Clanton in an episode of Dale Robertson's Tales of Wells Fargo on NBC. In 1958, he appeared in 1958 as Pete Hollis in the episode "Escape to the North" of the series Sergeant Preston of the Yukon. He made an uncredited appearance that same year as a cowboy in the film Saddle in the Wind.

After 26 Men, Henderson's acting was limited to the role of Frank Wilson in the 1965 German film, Der Schatz der Azteken, based on intrigue in Mexico during the 1860s at the time of Emperor Maximilian.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alex McNeil, Total Television, New York: Penguin Books, 1996, 4th ed., pp. 870-871
  2. ^ "Awards for Kelo Henderson". Internet Movie Data Base. Retrieved February 28, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Classic TV Western Shows: 26 Men". Fiftiesweb.com. Retrieved February 28, 2009. 
  4. ^ a b "Kelo Henderson". IMDB. Retrieved February 28, 2009.