Kenilworth, New Jersey

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Kenilworth, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Kenilworth
Oswald J. Nitschke House and War Memorial
Oswald J. Nitschke House and War Memorial
Map of Kenilworth in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Kenilworth in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Kenilworth, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Kenilworth, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°40′39″N 74°17′22″W / 40.67742°N 74.289341°W / 40.67742; -74.289341Coordinates: 40°40′39″N 74°17′22″W / 40.67742°N 74.289341°W / 40.67742; -74.289341[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Union
Incorporated May 13, 1907
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Scott Klinder (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Clerk Laura Reinertsen[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.161 sq mi (5.598 km2)
 • Land 2.157 sq mi (5.588 km2)
 • Water 0.004 sq mi (0.010 km2)  0.19%
Area rank 397th of 566 in state
17th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation [6] 115 ft (35 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total 7,914
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 8,090
 • Rank 291st of 566 in state
17th of 21 in county[12]
 • Density 3,668.3/sq mi (1,416.3/km2)
 • Density rank 173rd of 566 in state
14th of 21 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07033[13][14]
Area code(s) 908[15]
FIPS code 3403936690[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885267[18][2]
Website www.kenilworthborough.com

Kenilworth is a borough in Union County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 7,914,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 239 (+3.1%) from the 7,675 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 101 (+1.3%) from the 7,574 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Kenilworth was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on May 13, 1907, from portions of Cranford and Union Township, based on the results of a referendum held on June 18, 1907.[20]

Geography[edit]

Kenilworth is located at 40°40′39″N 74°17′22″W / 40.67742°N 74.289341°W / 40.67742; -74.289341 (40.67742,-74.289341). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.161 square miles (5.598 km2), of which, 2.157 square miles (5.588 km2) of it was land and 0.004 square miles (0.010 km2) of it (0.19%) was water.[1][2]

The borough is bordered to the north and east by Union Township, to the southeast by Roselle Park, to the southwest by Cranford, and to the northwest by Springfield Township.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 779
1920 1,312 68.4%
1930 2,243 71.0%
1940 2,451 9.3%
1950 4,922 100.8%
1960 8,379 70.2%
1970 9,165 9.4%
1980 8,221 −10.3%
1990 7,574 −7.9%
2000 7,675 1.3%
2010 7,914 3.1%
Est. 2013 8,090 [11] 2.2%
Population sources:
1910-1920[21] 1910[22] 1910-1930[23]
1930-1990[24] 2000[25][26] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,914 people, 2,841 households, and 2,102 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,668.3 per square mile (1,416.3 /km2). There were 2,924 housing units at an average density of 1,355.3 per square mile (523.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 88.07% (6,970) White, 2.91% (230) Black or African American, 0.14% (11) Native American, 3.84% (304) Asian, 0.03% (2) Pacific Islander, 3.31% (262) from other races, and 1.71% (135) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 15.52% (1,228) of the population.[7]

There were 2,841 households, of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.2% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.0% were non-families. 21.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.26.[7]

In the borough, 21.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.9 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.0 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $76,500 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,607) and the median family income was $84,097 (+/- $6,220). Males had a median income of $58,327 (+/- $7,147) versus $42,589 (+/- $5,730) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,959 (+/- $2,853). About 4.0% of families and 5.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.6% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.[27]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 7,675 people, 2,854 households, and 2,117 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,584.9 people per square mile (1,384.7/km2). There were 2,926 housing units at an average density of 1,366.7 per square mile (527.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 92.30% White, 2.30% African American, 0.25% Native American, 2.88% Asian, 1.80% from other races, and 1.38% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino residents of any race were 8.64% of the population.[25][26]

There were 2,854 households out of which 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.4% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.8% were non-families. 21.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.15.[25][26]

In the borough the population was spread out with 20.8% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 23.3% from 45 to 64, and 18.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.7 males.[25][26]

The median income for a household in the borough was $59,929, and the median income for a family was $66,500. Males had a median income of $40,808 versus $34,698 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,343. About 1.9% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.2% of those under age 18 and 3.2% of those age 65 or over.[25][26]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Kenilworth is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Kenilworth is Republican Scott Klinder, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Kenilworth Borough Council are Anthony DeLuca (D, 2014; Public Works), Toni K. Giordano (R, 2015; Planning, Zoning and Ordinance), Brian Joho (R, 2016; Finance), Kevin Leary (R, 2014; Health, Education and Welfare), Barbara Macescsko (R, 2016; Recreation and Fire) and Fred Pugliese (R, 2015; Public Safety).[3][28][29][30][31][32]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Kenilworth is located in the 7th Congressional District[33] and is part of New Jersey's 21st state legislative district.[8][34][35] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Kenilworth had been in the 20th state legislative district.[36]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[37] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[38][39] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[40][41]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 21st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Thomas Kean, Jr. (R, Westfield) and in the General Assembly by Jon Bramnick (R, Westfield) and Nancy Munoz (R, Summit).[42][43] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[44] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[45]

Union County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose nine members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis with three seats coming up for election each year, with an appointed County Manager overseeing the day-to-day operations of the county. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Chairman and Vice Chairman from among its members.[46] As of 2014, Union County's Freeholders are Chairman Christopher Hudak (D, Linden, term ends December 31, 2014),[47] Vice Chairman Mohamed S. Jalloh (D, Roselle, 2015),[48] Bruce Bergen (D, Springfield Township, 2015),[49] Linda Carter (D, Plainfield, 2016),[50] Angel G. Estrada (D, Elizabeth, 2014),[51] Sergio Granados (D, Elizabeth, 2016)[52] Bette Jane Kowalski (D, Cranford, 2016),[53] Alexander Mirabella (D, Fanwood, 2015)[54] and Vernell Wright (D, Union, 2014).[55][56] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi (D, Union, 2015),[57] Sheriff Ralph Froehlich (D, Union, 2016)[58] and Surrogate James S. LaCorte (D, Springfield Township, 2014).[59][60] The County Manager is Alfred Faella.[61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,891 registered voters in Kenilworth, of which 1,496 (30.6% vs. 41.8% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,076 (22.0% vs. 15.3%) were registered as Republicans and 2,317 (47.4% vs. 42.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[62] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 61.8% (vs. 53.3% in Union County) were registered to vote, including 79.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.6% countywide).[62][63]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,775 votes here (52.6% vs. 32.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,535 votes (45.5% vs. 66.0%) and other candidates with 39 votes (1.2% vs. 0.8%), among the 3,376 ballots cast by the borough's 5,167 registered voters, for a turnout of 65.3% (vs. 68.8% in Union County).[64][65] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,064 votes here (55.5% vs. 35.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,564 votes (42.0% vs. 63.1%) and other candidates with 54 votes (1.5% vs. 0.9%), among the 3,721 ballots cast by the borough's 5,039 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.8% (vs. 74.7% in Union County).[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,949 votes here (54.0% vs. 40.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,589 votes (44.0% vs. 58.3%) and other candidates with 32 votes (0.9% vs. 0.7%), among the 3,608 ballots cast by the borough's 4,927 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.2% (vs. 72.3% in the whole county).[67]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,442 votes here (59.9% vs. 41.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 759 votes (31.5% vs. 50.6%), Independent Chris Daggett with 148 votes (6.1% vs. 5.9%) and other candidates with 25 votes (1.0% vs. 0.8%), among the 2,408 ballots cast by the borough's 4,996 registered voters, yielding a 48.2% turnout (vs. 46.5% in the county).[68]

Mayors of Kenilworth[edit]

# Mayor Years in Office Notes
1 Charles C. Boyd 1907-1909 First mayor
2 William J. Hoiles 1910-1913
3 John Hiller 1914-1915
4 Charles C. Boyd 1916-1919
5 Oswald Nitschke 1919-1922
6 William J. Hoiles 1922-1923
7 Charles A. Kosmutza 1924-1925
8 August J. Stahl 1926-1927
9 Oswald Nitschke 1928-1929
10 August J. Stahl 1930-1931
11 Oswald Nitschke 1932-1933
12 Charles A. Kosmutza 1934-1935
13 Anthony Grippo 1936-1939
14 Max J. Berzin 1940-1947
15 Fred V. Pitten 1948-1951
16 William Lister 1952-1953
17 Robert Krueger 1954-1955
18 Walter E. Boright 1956-1961
19 William J. Ahern, Jr. 1962-1969
20 William E. Conrad, Jr. 1970-1975
21 Livio Mancino 1976-1987
22 Joseph A. Benintente 1988-1990 Ill during term; Dennis Schultz served as acting mayor for most of 1989; resigned in January 1990
23 Eugene Pepe 1990 Acting mayor until 1990 election
24 Joseph J. Rego 1991-1995
25 Michael A. Tripodi 1996-2003
26 Gregg F. David 2004-2007
27 Kathi Fiamingo 2008-2014 First female mayor; resigned after becoming a tax judge
28 Scott Klinder 2014- Mayor until general election in November, when a mayor will be elected to finish Kathi Fiamingo's term

Education[edit]

The Kenilworth Public Schools serve students in Pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 1,345 students and 104.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.88:1.[69] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[70]) are Harding Elementary School[71] (PreK-6; 679 students), David Brearley Middle School[72] (Grades 7 and 8, operated as a school within the High School) and David Brearley High School[73] (Grades 9-12; 666 students including the middle school).[74]

Students from Winfield Township also attend David Brearley High School as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Winfield Township School District.[75]

Kenilworth is home to a Roman Catholic elementary school at St. Theresa's, which was founded in 1954 and serves students in pre-school through eighth grade through the Salesians of Don Bosco.[76][77]

History[edit]

Upsala College

In the late 1890s, the New Orange Industrial Association purchased land in Cranford and Union that was subdivided into building lots. The firm brought in several large industries and lured Upsala College from Brooklyn with an offer of cash and free land for its campus.[78]

Because New Orange was often confused with one of The Oranges in Essex County, the name "Kenilworth" was chosen when the borough was incorporated in 1907.[79]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The borough had a total of 29.62 miles (47.67 km) of roadways, of which 24.22 miles (38.98 km) are maintained by the municipality, 4.00 miles (6.44 km) by Union County and 0.04 miles (0.064 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[80]

Kenilworth is served by two county routes, County Route 509 (CR 509) and CR 617. CR 509 (Boulevard) runs west-east through the borough, connecting it to Cranford, Springfield and Westfield in one direction and Union and Roselle Park in the other. CR 617 (Michigan Avenue) runs north-south, connecting Union and U.S. Route 22 at its north end to Roselle Park and Route 28 at its south end. The Garden State Parkway cuts northeast-southwest through the town, with Interchange 138 at CR 509 serving much of the town's long-distance travelers.[81]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between Kenilworth and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan in New York City and to New Jersey points, including the city of Elizabeth and nearby Union County College in Cranford. Local service is available on the 58 route, which is a direct descendant of Kenilworth's trolley route in the early 20th century.[82]

The closest New Jersey Transit rail station is Roselle Park, less than a mile from the Kenilworth border and offering direct service into New York City's Penn Station on the Raritan Valley Line.[83]

The Rahway Valley Railroad passed through the community but is currently out of service, the final train on the line having left the borough in April 1992. Originally established as the New York and New Orange Railroad, the line stretched 11.8 miles (19.0 km) from Aldene (now known as Roselle Park) to Summit. The headquarters of the railroad were located in Kenilworth, originally in Kenilworth's Victorian-style station house until that was severely damaged in a 1974 fire, after which railroad offices were moved into a trailer and then an unused railroad club car.[84][85]

Newark Liberty International Airport is approximately 9 miles (14 km) from Kenilworth.

Corporate residents[edit]

Maingear is a privately held computer manufacturer headquartered in Kenilworth, specializing in custom gaming computers, desktops, custom laptops, media center computers and workstations, all of which are manufactured in the United States.[86]

Merck & Co. announced plans in October 2013 to move its global headquarters from the Whitehouse Station of Readington Township, New Jersey to Kenilworth, on a site that the company had previously used as a manufacturing facility, with the relocation to be completed by 2015.[87] The campus had been used as the global headquarters for Schering-Plough, which was acquired by Merck in 2009.[88]

Noted natives[edit]

Noted current and former residents of Kenilworth include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 17, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Elected Officials, Borough of Kenilworth. Accessed July 10, 2014.
  4. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Kenilworth. Accessed July 10, 2014.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 90.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Kenilworth, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 6, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Kenilworth borough, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 9. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Kenilworth borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  10. ^ 2010 Census Populations: Union County, Asbury Park Press. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 14, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Kenilworth, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013. Source also lists 07098 for Kenilworth, but USPS web site lists this as invalid.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Kenilworth, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 239. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  21. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  22. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  23. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  24. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  25. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Kenilworth borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 17, 2013.
  26. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Kenilworth borough, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 17, 2013.
  27. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Kenilworth borough, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  28. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Kenilworth. Accessed July 10, 2014.
  29. ^ County Clerk Elections: Kenilworth – Roselle, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed May 17, 2013.
  30. ^ Union County 2011 General, November 8, 2011, Union County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed May 17, 2013.
  31. ^ Union Co 2012 General/School Election November 6, 2012, Union County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed May 17, 2013.
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  33. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  37. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  38. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  39. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  40. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  47. ^ Freeholder Christopher Hudak, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  48. ^ Freeholder Mohamed S. Jalloh, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  49. ^ Bruce Bergen, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  50. ^ Freeholder Vice Chairman Linda Carter, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder Angel G. Estrada, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder Sergio Granados, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder Bette Jane Kowalski, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder Alexander Mirabella, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder Vernell Wright, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
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  58. ^ Union County Sheriff Ralph Froehlich, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  59. ^ Surrogate, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
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  69. ^ District information for Kenilworth School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 10, 2014.
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  75. ^ David Brearly High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 11, 2014. "David Brearley Middle/High School is a public school in Kenilworth New Jersey. It serves students form [sic] grades 7 through 12. David Brearley Middle/High School has a send-and-receive relationship with Winfield Township beginning at the high school level."
  76. ^ Our Philosophy, St. Theresa School. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  77. ^ Union County Catholic Elementary Schools, Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  78. ^ Boright, Dr. Walter E. "Remembering when Kenilworth was a college town, Upsala College days revisited", Cranford Chronicle, September 21, 2010. Accessed May 17, 2013. "Its first president was Rev. Lars Herman Beck. In 1898 it was lured to Kenilworth, then know as New Orange, by investors of the New Orange Industrial Association who offered the college 14 acres of free land on a hill at the top of No. 21st St. and a few thousand dollars."
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  81. ^ Garden State Parkway Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, January 1997. Accessed July 21, 2014.
  82. ^ Union County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  83. ^ Raritan Valley Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed July 21, 2014.
  84. ^ Boright, Dr. Walter. "Remembering the New York and New Orange Railroad, the little railroad that helped build Kenilworth", Cranford Chronicle, April 17, 2011. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  85. ^ Boright, Walter E. "Rahway Valley Railroad: The little railroad that helped build Kenilworth, Part II", Cranford Chronicle, May 12, 2011. Accessed October 16, 2013.
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  87. ^ Friedman, Alexi. "In about-face, Merck will shutter Summit campus and make Kenilworth its headquarters", The Star-Ledger, October 1, 2013. Accessed October 16, 2013. "But today, the drugmaker announced an about-face, saying it had re-evalutated its real estate needs, and had decided to make the Kenilworth campus its global headquarters and shutter the Summit location. The Whitehouse Station campus will still close as planned, officials said. It has been Merck's global headquarters since 1992."
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