Kenneth Irons

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Kenneth Irons
Publication information
Publisher Image Comics/Top Cow
First appearance Cyblade/Shi: The Battle for Independents (1995)[1]

Kenneth Irons is a fictional comic book supervillain. He is depicted as the person behind nearly every evil deed in the Top Cow series Witchblade.[2][3][4]

Fictional character biography[edit]

Irons is the head of Irons International, businessman of the year of Fortune magazine and one of the ten richest men in the world. He made his fortune though drug trafficking, prostitution, slavery, and the arms industry. His one obsession is the Witchblade.

Irons was born in the mid-to-late 1100s during the reign of King Richard I and served as a leader of the Templar Knights in the Third Crusade. He and his son Gerard, along with a group of other Knights, made their way into a holy place were they found and drank from the Holy Grail, making them immortal.

In the late 19th century while on an archaeological dig in Greece, Irons discovered the Witchblade gauntlet and became obsessed with controlling the Witchblade and/or its host. When Sara Pezzini became the Witchblade's host, Irons turned his attention to her. His ambition came to an end when he was shot and killed by Sara's captain Joe Siry after Ian Nottingham and Excalibur stripped Irons immortality away from him.

Powers and abilities[edit]

After drinking from the Holy Grail, Irons became immortal and stopped aging. Irons possessed knowledge of magic spells and could also feel or sense magical energy. Irons was also a skilled swordsmanship and fighter due to his experiences with the Templar Knights. Iron's most potent weapons were his centuries of experience, his vast economic resources, and his influence over powerful underground organizations such as the Mafia and Yakuza.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Conroy, Mike (2004). 500 Comicbook Villains. London: Collins & Brown. p. 68. ISBN 9781843402053. 
  2. ^ "Comics2Film: 1026889200". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved 2015-01-17. 
  3. ^ Terrace, Vincent (2002). Crime Fighting Heroes of Television: Over 10,000 Facts from 151 Shows, 1949-2001. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers. pp. 193–195. ISBN 0786484454. 
  4. ^ O'Reilly, Julie D. (2013). Bewitched Again: Supernaturally Powerful Women on Television, 1996-2011. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers. p. 104-105. ISBN 9781476601618.