Kenneth L. Brown

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Kenneth Lee Brown was a U.S. ambassador to Ghana, Cote d'Ivoire, and Congo-Brazzaville.[1] As a career Foreign Service Officer from 1961 to 1995 he served at the American Embassy in Brussels and six posts in Africa. At the Department of State he held the positions of Deputy Director of UN Political Affairs, Associate Spokesman, Director of Central African Affairs, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Africa.

Brown was nominated as ambassador to Congo in November 1981 by President Ronald Reagan.[2] He was later chosen as ambassador to Cote d'Ivoire in August 1989[3] and as ambassador to Ghana in June 1992, both times by President George H. W. Bush.[1]

In May 2001 he became President of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training, an NGO that promotes understanding of American diplomacy, supports training of US foreign affairs personnel, and conducts oral histories of former Foreign Service officers and ambassadors [1] as part of the Foreign Affairs Oral History Collection at the Library of Congress.

After leaving the Foreign Service, Ambassador Brown became Director of the Dean Rusk Program in International Studies at Davidson College from 1995 to 2001. He has a BA in International Relations from Pomona College, an MA in International Relations from Yale University, an MA in Political Science from New York University, and a Ph.D. in Political Sociology from Cape Coast University in Ghana.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b George Bush Presidential Library. "Nomination of Kenneth L. Brown To Be United States Ambassador to Ghana". June 4, 1992. Retrieved on May 27, 2013.
  2. ^ New York Times. "U.S. ENVOY TO CONGO NAMED". Associated Press, November 17, 1981. Retrieved on May 27, 2013.
  3. ^ George Bush Presidential Library. "Nomination of Kenneth L. Brown To Be United States Ambassador to Cote d'Ivoire". August 24, 1989. Retrieved on May 27, 2013.