Kerrie Tucker

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Kerrie Tucker
Member of ACT Legislative Assembly
In office
18 February 1995 – 16 October 2004
Constituency Molonglo
Personal details
Born (1948-09-15) 15 September 1948 (age 66)
Nationality  Australia
Political party ACT Greens
Occupation Environmental and human rights activist

Kerrie Robyn Tucker (born 15 September 1948), former Australian politician, environmental and human rights activist,[1] was a member of the unicameral Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly representing the multi-member electorate of Molonglo for the ACT Greens between 1995 and 2001. Tucker was an unsuccessful candidate for election to the Australian Senate representing the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) for the Australian Greens at the 1993, 2004, and 2007 federal elections.

Early years[edit]

Prior to entering politics, Tucker was employed by the Canberra and South-East Region Environment Centre to work in the library and edit the Bogong magazine. She was a founding member of ACT Greens.[2]

Political career[edit]

Tucker was elected to the ACT Legislative Assembly, representing the Molonglo electorate for the ACT Greens in 1995, and was re-elected in 1998 and 2001.[3] During her term as a Member of the ACT Legislative Assembly, Tucker used her staffing allowance to employ part-time staff, who shared her political views. In 1999-2000, her office produced more legislation and amendments than any other non-government office.[4] Her term was marked by a progressive social agenda, including advocating for public housing, pro-choice and same-sex anti-discrimination laws, review of competition policy, substance abuse and progressive drug reform, and increasing the size of the Assembly from 17 members to 21 members.[4][4][5]

Tucker resigned her seat one month before the 2004 ACT general election in order to contest the 2004 federal election.[6]

She ran for election to the Australian Senate representing the Australian Capital Territory for the Australian Greens at the 1993 federal election, gaining 5.9% of the primary vote; falling well short of a quota.[7] Tucker ran again at the 2004 federal election gaining 16.4% of the primary vote, and was again unsuccessful.[8] Tucker ran again for the Senate at the 2007 federal election gaining 21.5% of the primary vote, and was unsuccessful in gaining election,[9][10] amidst significant media speculation that Tucker would defeat sitting Liberal Senator, Gary Humphries.[11]

Career post-politics[edit]

Since 2004, Tucker has worked as the Executive Officer of ACT Shelter, advocating for the needs of people experiencing homelessness and housing stress. In 2005 and 2006, she was co-chair of Anti-Poverty Week in the ACT and continues to contribute to the community on a voluntary basis through her work as an individual member of the ACT Collaboration. Tucker works part-time with the progressive left wing think tank, The Australia Institute.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Staff". The Australia Institute. 2010. Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  2. ^ "Tucker, Ms K., inaugural speech". ACT Hansard. ACT Legislative Assembly. 1995-05-02. Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  3. ^ "Members of the ACT Legislative Assembly". ACT Legislative Assembly. 2008. Retrieved 2010-08-02. 
  4. ^ a b c Armitage, Liz (2001-02-23). "It's not easy being green". The Canberra Times (Fairfax Media). Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  5. ^ "A case for more MLAs". The Canberra Times (Fairfax Media). 2002-06-28. Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  6. ^ Hannaford, Scott (2004-08-30). "Assembly to lose an MLA for a month". The Canberra Times (Fairfax Media). Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  7. ^ Carr, Adam (1993). "Senate - ACT - Results". 1993 Federal election results. Australian Electoral Commission. Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  8. ^ "Senate - ACT - Result of the Transfer and Distribution of Preferences". The official 2004 Federal election results. Australian Electoral Commission. 2004. Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  9. ^ "Senate - ACT - Result of the Transfer and Distribution of Preferences". The official 2007 Federal election results. Australian Electoral Commission. 2007. Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  10. ^ Green, Antony (2010). "Senate - ACT". Green Guide - 2010 Federal Election. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  11. ^ Martin, Peter (2007-11-04). "Libs set to lose ACT senate seat: Greens benefit from vote deal". The Canberra Times (Fairfax Media). Retrieved 2010-08-14.