Ketchum, Idaho

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Ketchum, Idaho
City
Bald-Mountain-Sun-Valley-Rd.jpg
Motto: "Small town, big life."
Location in Blaine County and the state of Idaho
Location in Blaine County and the state of Idaho
Coordinates: 43°40′52″N 114°22′18″W / 43.68111°N 114.37167°W / 43.68111; -114.37167Coordinates: 43°40′52″N 114°22′18″W / 43.68111°N 114.37167°W / 43.68111; -114.37167[1]
Country United States
State Idaho
County Blaine
Founded 1880
Government
 • Mayor Nina Jonas
Area[2]
 • Total 3.08 sq mi (7.98 km2)
 • Land 3.05 sq mi (7.90 km2)
 • Water 0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation 5,853 ft (1,784 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 2,689
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 2,680
 • Density 881.6/sq mi (340.4/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 83340
Area code(s) 208
FIPS code 16-43030
GNIS feature ID 0397833
Website ketchumidaho.org

Ketchum is a city in Blaine County, Idaho, United States, in the central part of the state. Ketchum is the city where Ernest Hemingway committed suicide in 1961. The population was 2,689 at the 2010 census, down from 3,003 in 2000. Located in the Wood River Valley, Ketchum is adjacent to Sun Valley and the communities share many resources; both sit in the same valley beneath Bald Mountain, with its world-famous skiing. The city also draws tourists from around the world to enjoy its fishing, hiking, trail riding, tennis, shopping, art galleries, and more. The airport for Ketchum, Friedman Memorial Airport, is approximately 15 miles (24 km) south in Hailey.

History[edit]

Originally the smelting center of the Warm Springs mining district, the town was first named Leadville in 1880. The postal department decided that was too common and renamed it for David Ketchum, a local trapper and guide who had staked a claim in the basin a year earlier. Smelters were built in the 1880s, with the Philadelphia Smelter, located on Warm Springs Road, processing large amounts of lead and silver for about a decade.[5]

After the mining boom subsided in the 1890s, sheepmen from the south drove their herds north through Ketchum in the summer, to graze in the upper elevation areas of the Pioneer, Boulder, and Sawtooth mountains. By 1920, Ketchum had become the largest sheep-shipping center in the West. In the fall, massive herds of sheep flowed south into the town's livestock corrals at the Union Pacific Railroad's railhead, which connected to the main line at Shoshone.[6]

After the development of Sun Valley by the Union Pacific Railroad in 1936, Ketchum became popular with celebrities, including Gary Cooper and Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway loved the surrounding area; he fished, hunted, and in the late 1950s bought a home overlooking the Wood River in nearby Warm Springs. It was there he committed suicide; he and his granddaughter, model and actress Margaux Hemingway, are buried in the Ketchum Cemetery.

Every Labor Day weekend, Ketchum hosts the Wagon Days festival, a themed carnival featuring Old West wagon trains, narrow ore wagons, a parade, and simulated street gunfights.

Geography[edit]

Ketchum is located at an elevation of 5,853 feet (1,784 m) above sea level.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.08 square miles (7.98 km2), of which, 3.05 square miles (7.90 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[2] However, two mountain streams, Trail Creek and Warm Springs Creek, join the Big Wood River in Ketchum.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 450
1900 300 −33.3%
1910 250 −16.7%
1920 213 −14.8%
1930 224 5.2%
1940 330 47.3%
1950 757 129.4%
1960 746 −1.5%
1970 1,454 94.9%
1980 2,200 51.3%
1990 2,523 14.7%
2000 3,003 19.0%
2010 2,689 −10.5%
source:[7][8]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 2,689 people, 1,431 households, and 583 families residing in the city. The population density was 881.6 inhabitants per square mile (340.4 /km2). There were 3,564 housing units at an average density of 1,168.5 per square mile (451.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.9% White, 0.1% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.3% Asian, 6.5% from other races, and 1.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.1% of the population.

There were 1,431 households of which 15.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.2% were married couples living together, 5.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 59.3% were non-families. 44.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.88 and the average family size was 2.63.

The median age in the city was 44 years. 14.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 31.4% were from 25 to 44; 32.3% were from 45 to 64; and 16.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 52.0% male and 48.0% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 3,003 people, 1,582 households, and 607 families residing in the city. The population density was 991.4 people per square mile (382.7/km²). There were 2,920 housing units at an average density of 964.0 per square mile (372.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.74% White, 0.27% Native American, 0.57% Asian, 0.17% Pacific Islander, 2.33% from other races, and 1.93% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.90% of the population.

There were 1,582 households out of which 14.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 30.1% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 61.6% were non-families. 42.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.90 and the average family size was 2.60.

In the city the population was spread out with 12.5% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 37.6% from 25 to 44, 31.1% from 45 to 64, and 9.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 116.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 117.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $45,457, and the median income for a family was $73,750. Males had a median income of $31,712 versus $27,857 for females. The per capita income for the city was $41,798. About 3.5% of families and 8.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.9% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

Points of interest[edit]

Special events[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Sister cities[edit]

Ketchum has two sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-03. 
  5. ^ "History". Ketchum / Sun Valley Historical Society. Retrieved 6 March 2012
  6. ^ "Idaho for the Curious", by Cort Conley, 1982, ISBN 0-9603566-3-0, p.348-349
  7. ^ Moffatt, Riley. Population History of Western U.S. Cities & Towns, 1850–1990. Lanham: Scarecrow, 1996, 94.
  8. ^ "Subcounty population estimates: Idaho 2000–2007" (CSV). United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 2009-03-18. Retrieved 2009-04-26. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]