Pakistani detainees at Guantanamo Bay

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According to the United States Department of Defense, there were five dozen Pakistan detainees in Guantanamo prior to May 15, 2006.[1] The Guantanamo Bay detention camp was opened on January 11, 2002. In the summer of 2004, following the United States Supreme Court's ruling in Rasul v. Bush, the Department of Defense stopped transferring men and boys to Guantanamo. The Supreme Court determined that the detainees had to be given a chance to challenge their detentions in an impartial tribunal.

On September 6, 2006 United States President George W. Bush announced the transfer of 14 high-value detainees from CIA custody to military custody at Guantanamo, including several additional Pakistanis.

On September 7, 2008 Pakistan's Daily Times quoted Hussain Haqqani, Pakistan Ambassador to the United States, stating that only five Pakistanis remained in captivity in Guantanamo: Ume Amaar Al Balochi, Majid Khan, Abdul Rabbani, Muhammad Ahmed, Ghulam Rabbani and Saifullah.[2] A sixth man, Qari Muhammad Saeed, was reported to have been released on August 29, 2008.

Pakistanis detainees in Guantanamo[edit]

Pakistani detainees
isn name arrival date release date notes
  • Reported to have spent four years in US custody, and then to have been transferred to Afghan custody.[3]
  • Reports severe torture in both Bagram and Guantanamo.[3]
  • Reportedly only able to return to his home in Pakistan in March 2010.[3]
10 Abdul Sattar 2002-05-05 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
11 Abdul Satar Nafeesi 2002-01-14 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
  • According to Pakistan's The Nation Nafeesi reported that he was tortured.[5] He was quoted as saying: “The Americans removed our beards and have been spitting over the holy Book,”
12 Shabidzada Usman 2002-01-11 2003-05-09
  • Repatriated on 9 May 2003.[4]
  • Mark Bowden, writing in the Philadelphia Inquirer, described traveling to Pakistan to interview Shabidzada and Shah Muhammad, another young Pakistani who was among the first captives to be released.[6] Bowden described being met by "warmth and elaborate courtesy" by the two released men, who he described as "uneducated, unworldly, and dirt poor". Bowden believed their accounts that they were rounded up and sold to the Americans by undiscriminating warlords, for a bounty, who didn't care if they were innocent.
14 Zafar Iqbal 2002-01-20 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
  • Iqbal was one of 17 Pakistanis freed from Pakistani custody, approximately seven months after being repatriated from Guantanamo to Pakistan.June 28, 2005.[5]
  • The Daily Times reported that Zafaar Iqbal was from Jhang.[7]
15 Zia Ul Shah 2002-01-14 2006-10-11
16 Jamal Muhammad Al-Deen 2002-01-14 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
17 Muhammed Ijaz Khan 2002-01-14 2004-09-17
18 Mohammed Sayed 2002-01-14 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
19 Sha Mohammed Alikhel 2002-01-14 2003-05-09
  • Repatriated on 9 May 2003.[4]
  • Reported being administered powerful psychoactive drugs in captivity.[10] Reported on-going suicidal impulses after release.
20 Mohammed Isha 2002-01-14 2003-11-18
  • Repatriated on 18 November 2003.[4]
21 Salah Hudin 2002-01-20 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
23 Isa Khan 2002-01-20 2004-09-17
47 Asad Ullah 2002-01-17 2003-07-16
85 Munir Bin Naseer 2003-11-30
97 Tariq Khan 2002-06-16 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
98 Hafiz Ihsan Saeed 2002-01-20 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
99 Abdul Raziq 2002-06-16 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
100 Mohammed Ashraf 2002-05-05 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
  • Pakistan's Daily Times reports that Mohammed Asharf was born in Khoshab.[7]
  • He spent a further nine months in Pakistani custody upon his repatriation.[5]
101 Mohammed Irfan 2002-02-09 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
106 Mohammed Raz 2002-02-10 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
113 Said Saim Ali 2002-05-05 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
134 Ghaser Zaban Safollah 2002-01-17 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
135 Ejaz Ahmad Khan 2002-06-12 2003-11-18
  • Repatriated on 18 November 2003.[4]
136 Tarik Mohammad 2002-01-15 2003-11-30
  • Repatriated on 30 November 2003.[4]
137 Mohammed Tariq 2002-01-18 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
138 Salahodin Ayubi 2002-01-18 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
139 Hafice Leqeat Manzu 2002-01-17 2003-11-18
  • Repatriated on 18 November 2003.[4]
140 Said Saim Ali 2002-01-17 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
141 Haseeb Ayub 2002-01-18 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
  • The US Department of Defense reports that he was born on January 8, 1974, in Budho, Pakistan.[1]
  • He spent a further nine months in Pakistani custody upon his repatriation.[7]
142 Fazaldad 2002-05-03 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
143 Mohammad Sanghir 2002-01-18 2002-10-28
  • Saghir was one of the first four detainees to be released from Guantanamo.[14]
  • Saghir is suing the United States for $10.4 million for the torture and abuse he reports he endured.[15]
  • Saghir has been frequently sought out for interviews.[16][17]
  • Repatriated on 28 October 2002.[4]
144 Mohammad Il Yas 2002-01-17 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
145 Hamood Ullah Khan 2002-01-15 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
146 Mohammad Kashef Khan 2002-01-18 2003-07-16
147 Mohammed Arshad Raza 2002-01-18 2004-09-17
210 Faik Iqbal 2002-01-21 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
247 Kay Fiyatullah 2002-06-12 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
299 Abid Raza 2002-06-12 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
  • Alleged to have traveled to Afghanistan to fight "hindus".[18]
300 Zahid Sultan 2002-02-07 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
301 Khalil Rahman Hafez 2002-02-08 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
302 Mohamed Ijaz 2002-02-11 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
303 Ali Ahmed 2002-02-12 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
304 Mohammed Ansar 2002-02-09 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
305 Hanif Mohammed 2002-02-17 2004-09-17
  • Was one of 17 Pakistanis freed from Pakistani custody, approximately seven months after being repatriated from Guantanamo to Pakistan.June 28, 2005.[5][7]
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
442 Abdul Mowla 2002-06-12 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
444 Jihan Wali 2002-06-12 2003-05-09
  • Repatriated on 9 May 2003.[4]
  • Shah Mohammed, one of the other Pakistani men released at the same time he was, told the BBC that they were given psychoactive drugs, and that Jehan Wali had not spoken for eight months.[19]
495 Mohammed Rafiq 2002-05-05 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
504 Aminullah Amin 2002-05-03 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
515 Israr Ul Haq 2002-06-12 2004-03-14
  • Repatriated on 14 March 2004.[4]
524 Mohammed Anwar 2002-05-03 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
529 Bacha Khan 2002-06-16 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
540 Mohammed Omar 2002-10-28 2004-09-17
541 Mohammed Noman 2002-06-16 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
542 Mohammad Abas 2002-06-16 2004-03-14
  • Repatriated on 14 March 2004.[4]
545 Sajin Urayman 2002-06-12 2003-07-16
  • Repatriated on 16 July 2003.[4]
581 Abdur Sayed Rahaman 2002-06-16 2005-03-11
  • Repatriated on 11 March 2005.[4]
586 Karam Khamis Sayd Khamsan 2002-05-01 2005-08-19
  • Determined not to be an "enemy combatant" after all.[4][21]
624 Majid Mehmood 2002-06-12 2003-11-18
  • Repatriated on 18 November 2003.[4]
634 Ali Mohammed 2002-06-16 2004-03-14
  • Repatriated on 14 March 2004.[4]
743 Hafez Qari Mohamed Saad Iqbal Madni 2003-03-23 2008-08-31
  • Repatriated on 31 August 2008.[4]
830 Tila Mohammed Khan 2002-10-28 2003-11-18
  • Repatriated on 18 November 2003.[4]
842 Sultan Ahmad 2003-02-07 2004-09-17
  • Was minor when captured.[1]
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
  • The Daily Times reported that Sultan Ahmad and sixteen other former captives were released from Pakistani custody on June 28, 2005.[5][7]
843 Saghir Ahmed 2003-02-07 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
1005 Bashir Ahmad 2003-05-09 2004-09-17
  • Described horrific abuse in Sheberghan Prison, Bagram and Guantanamo.[22][23]
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
  • The Daily Times reported that Bashir Ahmed and sixteen other former captives were released from Pakistani custody on June 28, 2005.[5][7]
1006 Mohammed Irfan 2003-05-09 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
1007 Abdul Halim Sadiqi 2003-05-09 2006-10-11
  • Repatriated on 11 October 2006.[4]
1011 Mohammed Akbar 2003-05-09 2004-09-17
  • Repatriated on 17 September 2004.[4]
1018 Ammar al-Baluchi
1094 Saifullah Paracha
1460 Abdul Al-Rahim Ghulam Rabbani 2004-09-20
1461 Mohammed Ahmad Ghulam Rabbani 2004-09-20
10020 Majid Khan 2006-09-06
10024 Khalid Sheikh Mohammed 2006-09-06
  • Was held in the CIA's black sites prior to transfer to Guantanamo.
  • Was waterboarded in CIA custody
  • Confessed to a role in practically every terrorist attack of the last fifteen years.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006". United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 2006-05-15. 
  2. ^ "Haqqani meets US officials, discusses release of Pakistanis at Guantanamo". Daily Times (Pakistan). 2008-09-07. Retrieved 2008-09-12. 
  3. ^ a b c Saeed Zaman Afridi (2010-03-08). "Jamrud resident freed from Gitmo after four years". The News International. Archived from the original on 2010-03-09. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn OARDEC (2008-10-09). "Consolidate chronological listing of GTMO detainees released, transferred or deceased". Department of Defense. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "17 ex-Gitmo detainees freed". The Nation (Pakistani newspaper). June 28, 2005. Retrieved 2007-01-21. [dead link]
  6. ^ Mark Bowden (2008-09-21). "The Point: Disturbing line Palin tossed off in address". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 2009-01-05. [dead link] mirror
  7. ^ a b c d e f g "17 ex-Guantanamo prisoners released". Daily Times. June 28, 2005. Retrieved 2007-01-21. 
  8. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Zia Khalid Najib". Miami Herald. Retrieved 2008-06-16.  mirror
  9. ^ OARDEC (date redacted). "Summarized Unsworn Detainee Statement". United States Department of Defense. pp. pages 70–71. Retrieved 2009-01-27.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  10. ^ People the law forgot, The Guardian, 3 December 2003
  11. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Issa Khan". Miami Herald. Retrieved 2008-06-16.  mirror
  12. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Asadullah Jan". Miami Herald. Retrieved 2008-06-16.  mirror
  13. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Munir Naseer". Miami Herald. Retrieved 2008-06-17.  mirror
  14. ^ "Afghans Describe Life Inside Gitmo". CBS News. October 29, 2002. Retrieved 2008-06-17.  mirror
  15. ^ "Pakistani says life in ruins after Guantanamo jail". Khaleej Times. September 11, 2006. Retrieved 2008-06-17.  - mirror mirror
  16. ^ "Cuba:Escape from Camp Delta". Le Monde. March 11, 2004. Retrieved 2007-07-03. 
  17. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Mohammed Sagheer". Miami Herald. Retrieved 2008-06-16.  mirror
  18. ^ Summary of Evidence memo (.pdf) prepared for Abid Raza's Combatant Status Review Tribunal - page 17
  19. ^ Haroon Rashid (2003-05-23). "Pakistani relives Guantanamo ordeal". BBC News. Retrieved 2009-01-09. 
  20. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Mohammed Omar". McClatchy News Service. Retrieved 2008-06-15.  mirror
  21. ^ "Detainees Found to No Longer Meet the Definition of "Enemy Combatant" during Combatant Status Review Tribunals Held at Guantanamo" (PDF). United States Department of Defense. November 19, 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-01. 
  22. ^ Tom Lasseter (2008-06-14). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Bashir Ahmad". McClatchy News Services. Archived from the original on 2009-01-06. 
  23. ^ Andy Worthington (February 6, 2009). "The Guantánamo Files: Website Extras (7) – From Sheberghan to Kandahar". Archived from the original on 2010-04-17.