Khalistan Zindabad Force

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Khalistan Zindabad Force
Khalistan-Zindabad-Force.png
Major actions 1988-present
Leader(s) Ranjit Singh Neeta
Motives The creation of a Sikh independent state of Khalistan in Punjab, as well as some districts of neighboring states of India.
Active region(s) India
Ideology Sikh nationalism
Status Active[1]

The Khalistan Zindabad Force (KZF) is a militant group, and is part of the Khalistan movement to create a Sikh homeland called Khalistan via armed struggle. It was identified in 2005 as a terrorist organisation by the EU.[2]

Organization and activity[edit]

The Khalistan Zindabad Force is headed by Ranjit Singh Neeta, a native of Jammu & Kashmir.[1] He was listed among India's 20 most wanted persons in 2008.[3]

The strength and striking capabilities of the Khalistan Zindabad Force are currently unknown, but it is reported that attempts have been made for the Khalistan Zindabad Force and other militant groups from Kashmir to co-ordinate their efforts.[1] In December 2005 the European Union classified the Khalistan Zindabad Force as a terrorist organization, freezing its monetary assets throughout its 25 member countries.[2] The Khalistan Zindabad Force was reported to still be active in 2008.[1]

Claims[4][5] and denials [4] [6] of responsibility have been reported in the name of the Khalistan Zindabad Force for a May 2009 attack at the Gurdwara Nanaksar in Vienna, Austria, that left Rama Nand, a leader of the Dera Sach Khand dead, 17 injured,[7][8] and sparked riots across northern India.[9][10][11][12][13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Ranjit Singh Neeta (Khalistan Zindabad Force)". The Indian Express. December 4, 2008. Retrieved 2009-06-18. 
  2. ^ a b http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/site/en/oj/2005/l_340/l_34020051223en00640066.pdf
  3. ^ "10) Ranjit Singh Neeta". rediff.com. June 24, 2008. Retrieved 2009-06-19. 
  4. ^ a b "KZF takes responsibility for Vienna temple massacre". Austriantimes.at. 29. 05. 09. Retrieved 2009-05-31. 
  5. ^ "Sikh: Alarm vor Tag der offenen Tür in Wien (loosely "Sikh: Alarm before "Open Day" in Vienna)" (in German (bit of Vienna dialect)). Die Presse. 2009-05-28. Retrieved 2009-06-02. 
  6. ^ "KZF denies involvement in attack". The Tribune. May 28, 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-31. "People are being misled in the name of the KZF. The incident has hurt the entire Sant Ravidass brotherhood. The KZF begs pardon from the entire Sikh panth and also from the Sant Ravidass brotherhood." 
  7. ^ "KZF takes responsibility for Vienna temple massacre – General News – Austrian Times". Austriantimes.at. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  8. ^ "Suspects in Sikh temple attack identified: Austria - India - NEWS - The Times of India". The Times of India. 2009-05-29. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  9. ^ "South Asia | Punjab riots after Vienna killing". BBC News. 2009-05-25. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  10. ^ "From Vienna To Jalandhar". www.outlookindia.com. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  11. ^ [1][dead link]
  12. ^ "Europe | Preacher dies after Vienna clash". BBC News. 2009-05-25. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 
  13. ^ KZF claims responsibility for Vienna attack; Babbar Khalsa condemns killing