Khmer Anti-Poverty Party

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Khmer Anti Poverty Party
Kanakpak Khmer Chuop Krah
Leader Daran Kravanh
Founded September 2007
Ideology Nationalism, anti-poverty, liberalism
Politics of Cambodia
Political parties
Elections

The Khmer Anti-Poverty Party is a Cambodian political party founded in September 2007.[1] Its leader is Cambodian-American Daran Kravanh.[1][2]

Political ideology[edit]

The Khmer Anti-Poverty Party believes in defending Cambodia's "territorial integrity" and opposes "any foreign tyrant leader".[1] The party aims to prevent poverty and to create new ministries for the disabled and for job seekers.[1] In the 2008 national election, the party proposed to bring American-style governance to Cambodia, claiming that the party had the support of 300 American advisers and governors.[2]

In the 2013 election, the party claimed that it had the backing and support of 140,000 foreign advisers and 13 wealthy investors who would make the party's vision of ending poverty in Cambodia a success. However the party did not gain a seat in parliament.

Political activities[edit]

An alliance between the KAPP, Society of Justice Party, and the Khmer Republican Party was announced in late June 2008 (in time for July national election),[3] though it was retracted by the Khmer Republican Party within days.[4] The party was expected to win 41 seats in the National Assembly in the election,[1] but it garnered only 0.16% of the national vote and won no seats.[5] Daran rejected the legitimacy of the election results.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Meas Sokchea and Sebastian Strangio. "Party profiles: An election rundown". Phnom Penh Post (July 11, 2008).
  2. ^ a b "Anti-poverty leader revels in US backing" Phnom Penh Post (April 17, 2008).
  3. ^ Win Thida. "Three Small Parties Consider Alliance". Voice of America Khmer (July 1, 2008).
  4. ^ Meas Sokchea and Cat Barton. "Down for the count?" Phnom Penh Post (July 11, 2008).
  5. ^ http://www.cambodia.org/election/
  6. ^ "Minor party leaders wonder where all their votes went." Phnom Penh Post (July 31, 2008).