Khunais ibn Hudhaifa

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Khunais ibn Hudhaifa (خنيس بن حذيفة) (d. 2 AH/624) was a companion of Muhammad.

Biography[edit]

Khunais was the son of Hudhafa ibn Qays from the Sahm clan of the Quraysh tribe in Mecca. His mother, Da'ida bint Hidhyam, was also from the Sahm clan.[1] He had two brothers, Abdullah and Qays.[2]

He was converted to Islam under the influence of Abu Bakr[3] at an early date "before Allah's Messenger entered the house of Al-Arqam".[4]

He joined the emigration to Abyssinia in 616, along with his two brothers, seven cousins and four other members of the Sahm clan.[5] Khunais was among those who returned to Mecca in 619 "under the protection of a citizen or by stealth."[6] Soon afterwards he married Hafsa bint Umar,[7] who would then have been about fourteen years old.[8]

When Umar emigrated to Medina in 622, Khunais and Hafsa accompanied his party.[9] At first they lodged with Rifa'a ibn Abdalmundhir.[10] When Muhammad instructed each Muslim to take a brother in Islam, he paired Khunais with Abu Abs ibn Jabr,[11] a brother-in-law of Muhammad ibn Maslama.[12]

Khunais was the only member of the Sahm clan who fought at the Battle of Badr in March 624.[13]

He died "at the beginning of twenty-five months after the Prophet emigrated to Madina,"[14] i.e., in late August 624. He was buried at Al-Baqi', where Muhammad personally officiated at his funeral.[15]

He had no descendants.[16] His widow, Hafsa, later married Muhammad.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Muhammad ibn Saad, Tabaqat vol. 3. Translated by Bewley, A. (2013). The Companions of Badr, p. 307. London: Ta-Ha Publishers.
  2. ^ Muhammad ibn Ishaq, Sirat Rasul Allah. Translated by Guillaume, A. (1955). The Life of Muhammad, pp. 147-148. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  3. ^ Ibn Ishaq/Guillaume p. 116.
  4. ^ Ibn Saad/Bewley vol. 3 p. 307.
  5. ^ Ibn Ishaq/Guillaume pp. 147-148.
  6. ^ Ibn Ishaq/Guillaume p. 168.
  7. ^ Ibn Ishaq/Guillaume p. 218.
  8. ^ Muhammad ibn Saad, Tabaqat vol. 8. Translated by Bewley, A. (1995). The Women of Madina, p. 56. London: Ta-Ha Publishers.
  9. ^ Ibn Ishaq/Guillaume p. 218.
  10. ^ Ibn Ishaq/Guillaume p. 218. Ibn Saad/Bewley vol. 3 p. 307.
  11. ^ Ibn Saad/Bewley vol. 3 pp. 307, 353.
  12. ^ Ibn Saad/Bewley vol. 3 p. 352.
  13. ^ Ibn Ishaq/Guillaume p. 329.
  14. ^ Ibn Saad/Bewley vol. 3 p. 307.
  15. ^ Ibn Saad/Bewley vol. 3 p. 307.
  16. ^ Ibn Saad/Bewley vol. 3 p. 307.
  17. ^ Ibn Hisham note 918.

External links[edit]