Kiki Carter

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Kiki Carter
Kiki Carter.jpg
Born November 21, 1957
Gainesville, Florida
Nationality United States
Alma mater University of Florida
Known for Being an environmental activist, organizer, musician, songwriter, and columnist
Spouse(s) Rick Carter
Greg Webb

Kiki Carter born Kimberli Wilson (b. November 21, 1957 in Gainesville, Florida) is an environmental activist, organizer, musician, songwriter, and columnist.

Personal life[edit]

She was the first of four children, born to a father of British descent, Harold Wilson, and an Italian mother, Priscilla Normandy (Patti Greenwood). She attended 12 different schools before graduating from Gainesville High School in 1974. She entered the University of Florida at age 16, where she majored in music performance and music education.

While in Los Angeles, in May 1984, Carter married first husband Rick Carter,[1] over her manager's strong protests. She had only known him for one month when they eloped to Las Vegas.[1] They returned to Gainesville, and their son Richard was born in 1986.

In February 1998, Carter married singer/songwriter, Greg Webb, the lead singer of the Gainesville, Florida based Rhythm and Blues Revue, changing her name to Kiki Webb. They began collaborating musically and formed the acoustic duo, dancing Light (Sunblossom Records). The name dancing Light came from a song of the same title, written about a vision Carter (then Kimberli Wilson) had after a near-death experience.[2][3]

Carter and Webb moved to his family's property on Leech Lake in northern Minnesota in 2000.[4]

Musical career[edit]

As a euphonium student at the University of Florida Carter won the Sigma Alpha Iota "Outstanding Freshman Musician Award" for the 1974-75 year. Throughout her college years, Carter performed in various ensembles, symphonic bands and wind ensembles as principal/solo euphoniumist.

In the summer of 1976, Carter traveled to Ruston Louisiana to study with euphonium soloist, Raymond Young, then head of the Department of Music at Louisiana Tech University.[5] She completed her junior year of college in Ruston, majoring in euphonium and minoring on piano, before returning to the University of Florida in the fall of 1978.

In 1979, University of Florida Music Department Chairman Budd Udell included a euphonium solo written for Carter in Forces One, the first movement of his Symphony for Band. The Symphony was premiered at the Music Educators National Conference convention in Miami Beach on April 9, 1980 with Carter performing the solo.[6] The same year, Carter was one of eight national finalists in the Tubist Universal Brotherhood Association's national collegiate solo contest for euphonium.

Carter graduated from the University of Florida in March 1981 and briefly did post-baccalaureate work as a theater major, before leaving to audition for euphonium jobs in Washington D.C. military service bands.[1] She started studying with Brian Bowman, euphonium soloist of the United States Air Force Band in Washington DC. During her studies in DC, Carter worked as a governess for Washington Post publisher, Donald Graham and his wife, Mary.[1]

While in Washington DC, Carter began playing guitar and writing songs. She became disillusioned with the prospect of a professional military band career and returned to Gainesville in February 1982.[1] Through a mutual friend, Carter met Michele Marino, who began managing Carter's career. Marino booked Carter's first television appearances a solo performer on The Kim Edstrom Show.[7] Carter started playing in area clubs, often accompanied by pianist and singer, Sidney Bertisch.

In 1984, Carter and Marino travelled to Los Angeles, California, where Carter won the weekly music contest at the Palomino Club in North Hollywood[1] The contest brought her to the attention of Capitol Records VP Joe McFadden who gave her his business card and suggested she contact him. Through manager, Michele, Carter came to the attention of Robert L. "Bumps" Blackwell,[1] songwriter, record producer, and manager of Little Richard. Bumps arranged for Carter to sing with a group appearing in a 1983 Los Angeles television show with Billy Preston. Robert Blackwell managed Carter until his death in March 1985.

During those years, Carter made several trips from Gainesville to Nashville to meet with Capitol Records. Before a deal was struck, Capitol Records experienced a major restructuring and her contacts had been replaced.

She and her husband, Greg Webb, later began touring Minnesota, as the acoustic duo, Dancing Light.[8][9] As Dancing Light, they released their first full-length CD, Meadowdance in 1993.[10]

Carter and Webb co-founded independent record label Sunblossom Records, and she is founder of music publishing company Shebreana Music (BMI) They started Saturday Cafe Concert Series, a weekly Concert series in Northern Minnesota.[11] They continued to perform at benefit concerts.[12][13][14]

Activism[edit]

At the end of 1986, Carter's mother, author Patti Greenwood learned of the US Department of Energy's plans to build a demonstration irradiation facility in Gainesville, Florida.[15][16]

Greenwood shared the news with Carter. In early 1987, Carter called the local television station, ABC affiliate WCJB-TV to alert them to plans by the United States Department of Energy and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to build a food irradiation facility in Gainesville, Florida, using radioactive caesium-137.[17][18][19][20] This project was part of the United States Department of Energy's By-Products Utilization Program (BUP). The BUP was born out of a Congressional mandate to find uses for by-products of plutonium production.

Carter was invited to appear live in the studio with the WCJB anchors. Soon a grassroots movement was galvanizing with Carter and her mother at the epicenter.

Carter and her mother founded the organization Citizens Against a Radioactive Environment (C.A.R.E.) to oppose the use of Department of Energy stores of radioactive caesium-137 in a demonstration food irradiation facility. The caesium-137 was slated to be used at six different demonstration irradiators through the country, one of which was proposed for Gainesville, Florida.[21] After a groundswell of public opposition, public debates, and public forums, the caesium-137 was never used in the facility.[22]

Carter organized a state-wide coalition of concerned citizens called the Florida Coalition to Stop Food Irradiation in response to plans for another irradiator in Plant City, FL.[23] and national TV[24][25][26] and helping to organize fledgling groups in other communities.[27][28]

Working as an environmental activist expanded Carter's awareness of other environmental and social justice issues. She helped wherever she could, appearing at public meetings and performing at benefit concerts.[29] She became active in helping to raise awareness of radon issues in Alachua County and helped provide free test kits to residents.[30] Her pet projects included the I.C.E.S. fruition project, where she organized plantings of fruit trees in Habitat for Humanity homesites,[31] and promoting the use of reusable bags in grocery stores.[32]

Carter was an independent candidate in 1988 for the Alachua County Commission, losing to wildlife artist Kate Barnes.

In 1992, Carter wrote a weekly column for the Marion/Alachua edition of the Tampa Tribune called Environmentally Speaking.

Carter often used her musical talents and connections to organize and participate in fundraising concerts for her environmental causes, including a 1996 concert at the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts featuring world-renowned violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg and the Gainesville Chamber Orchestra.[33] Carter also composed songs and produced regional television commercials for the United Way.

She became active in the Leech Lake Head Start program on the Leech Lake Indian Reservation where she chaired the parent committee of her son's Head Start program and was elected to chair the policy council of the Leech Lake Head Start program.

In the fall of 2005 Carter and her husband helped organize the Great Gala for the Gulf, a benefit concert for survivors of Hurricane Katrina, held at the Moondance Jam site in Northern Minnesota.[34][35][36] raising over $5,000 for relief to survivors.[37][38][39]

Carter is currently a vocal proponent of the campaign to establish a United States Department of Peace

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g DeYoung, Bill: "Kiki Carter Comes Home to Sing", page 7. Scene Magazine, The Gainesville Sun, February 22, 1985
  2. ^ Wilson, Kimberli: "Dayspring", page 25. New Age Gainesville, September 1983
  3. ^ Arndorfer, Bob: "Mars Madness", Section A, page 1 (headline).The Gainesville Sun, July 13, 1997
  4. ^ cached story from The Gainesville Iguana online
  5. ^ Author unknown: "Euphoniums can be special instrument: Florida girl studies at Tech", Ruston Daily Leader, May, 1976
  6. ^ "In Concert, The University of Florida Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble, Frank B. Wickes, Conductor", Conference Program, April 9, 1980
  7. ^ Staff Writer: "Spotlight", page 1. Alligator's Applause Summer Magazine, The Independent Florida Alligator, August 5, 1983
  8. ^ Thompson, Chris: "Acoustic folk duo coming to Borderland", page 6. The Daily Journal, September 17, 2003
  9. ^ Steele, Adam: photograph with caption, page 7. The Northern Herald, December 30, 2003
  10. ^ LeCompte, Gale: "Dancing Light releases Meadowdance", section C, page 1. Herald Review, July 13, 2003
  11. ^ Saturday Cafe Concert Series
  12. ^ Higgins, Toni: "Walker community gives for Radiothon to End Child Abuse", story online The Pilot-Independent, December 27, 2005
  13. ^ "'Homes Fires Burning' concert was spectacular",story online,The Pilot-Independent, December 15th
  14. ^ "Leech Lake Area Habitat for Humanity says,'Thanks!'",story online,The Pilot-Independent, August 5, 2004
  15. ^ Greenwood, Patti: "Food Irradiation: Battle lines are forming", page 18. Skylight, October 1986
  16. ^ Greenwood, Patti: "Irradiation of food is new frontier", section A, page 11. The Gainesville Sun, December 2, 1986
  17. ^ Barber, John: "Glowing Concerns", Eating Well, pages 37-43.Eating Well: The Magazine of Food & Health, February 1992
  18. ^ Galen Moses: "Carter: performer and persuasive crusader", section A, page 1.The Gainesville Sun, August 10, 1987
  19. ^ Galen Moses: "A fight is unfolding over plans for an irradiator",section A, page 1.The Gainesville Sun, April 11, 1987
  20. ^ Hartley, Thornton: "Gainesville Irradiation Plant Opposed" section B, page 1. The Florida Times Union, April 19, 1987
  21. ^ Galen Moses: "Construction is planned for food-irradiation plant", page 5B.The Gainesville Sun, February 26, 1987
  22. ^ Moses, Galen: "Caesium-137 won't be used in irradiator," section A, page 1 headlineThe Gainesville Sun, January 14, 1988 includes photo of Kiki Carter with caption
  23. ^ Pearson, Joyce, Producer: "Eye on Tampa Bay" WTVT. November 15, 1991
  24. ^ Consumer segment on food irradiation: Good Morning America, ABC-TV. August 15, 1991, 7:40 am
  25. ^ "Kiki Carter on TV this morning", section B, page 1. The Gainesville Sun, August 15, 1991
  26. ^ Rather, Dan and Vasquez, Juan: CBS Evening News Vanderbilt Television News Archive Friday, Jan 10, 1992
  27. ^ Stutzman, Rene: "Irradiation foes noisy at protest", Section A, page 1. Orlando Sentinel, November 5, 1991
  28. ^ Hicks, Sally: "Radiation plant may face a fight", page 1. St. Petersburg Times, 1991
  29. ^ "Earth Day Benefit",Notes, Scene Magazine, The Gainesvile Sun, Friday, April 20, 1990
  30. ^ Blaugrund, Andrea: "Confusion mounting over radon", section A, page 1.The Gainesville Sun, April 9, 1988
  31. ^ Joyce Slaton: "Little Steps To Big Solutions", page 19.Moon Magazine, December 92/January 93
  32. ^ Harris, Christy: "Environmental concerns in the bag", section D, page 1. The Palm Beach Post, June 17, 1990 (includes photo of Kiki Carter with reusable bags)
  33. ^ Grundy, David M.: "Will Salerno-Sonnenberg return to Gainesville?" Scene Magazine. The Gainesville Sun, August 7, 1992
  34. ^ "Great Northwoods Gala for the Gulf", section A, page 1. The Pilot Independent, October 5, 2005
  35. ^ "Great Northwoods Gala for the Gulf", section A, page 1. Northland Press, October 4, 2005
  36. ^ "Great Northwoods Gala for the Gulf: Minnesota communities come together to aid Hurricane victims: Music festival, art sale set for Oct. 9 at Moondance Saloon and Grill at Moondance Jam Fairground near Walker",The Pilot-Independent, October 4, 2005
  37. ^ DeBoer, Gail: "Great Northwoods Gala for the Gulf raises more than $5,000 for relief",section A, page 1. The Pilot Independent, October 19, 2005 (print version)
  38. ^ DeBoer, Gail: "Great Northwoods Gala for the Gulf raises more than $5,000 for hurricane relief"The Pilot-Independent, October 18, 2005 (online version)
  39. ^ Boblett, Paul: "Great Northwoods Gala for the Gulf raises over $5,000",section A, page 1. Northland Press, October 18, 2005

Sources[edit]

Feature articles about Kiki Carter[edit]

  • DeYoung, Bill: "Kiki Carter Comes Home to Sing", page 7. Scene Magazine, The Gainesville Sun, February 22, 1985
  • Galen Moses: "Carter: performer and persuasive crusader", The Gainesville Sun, page 1, August 10, 1987
  • Barber, John: "Glowing Concerns", Eating Well, pages 37–43. Eating Well: The Magazine of Food & Health, February 1992
  • Joyce Slaton: "Little Steps To Big Solutions,", Moon Magazine, December 92/January 93

Articles mention or quote Kiki Carter[edit]

Articles written by Kiki Carter[edit]

  • "Family Lives the Environmentalist Life," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, May 9, 1992
  • "Greens Take Root in Florida," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, May 16, 1992
  • "Expert Finds Some Ways to Save Money on Energy," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, May 23, 1992
  • "Retiree is concerned for environment," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, May 30, 1992
  • "Researcher giving time to planet he loves," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, June 8, 1992
  • "Clay Pipe Along Creek Should be Monitored," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, June 13, 1992
  • "Garden Mirrors Man's Philosophy," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, June 20, 1992
  • "Poe Springs Popular for Swimming," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, June 27, 1992
  • "We are Dependent Creatures," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, July 4, 1992
  • "Environmental Activist Launched Idea Exchange," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, July 11, 1992
  • "Earth May Have 'Energy Points'," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, July 25, 1992
  • "Man Credits Diet With Improving Life," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, August 1, 1992
  • "We're Burying Ourselves in Garbage," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, August 8, 1992
  • "Alachua Candidates Answer Environmental Questions," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, August 18, 1992
  • "Candidates Face Environmental Issues," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, August 22, 1992
  • "EPA Suggests Testing for Radon," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, August 29, 1992
  • "Scorecard Rates Lawmakers on Environmental Action," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, September 5, 1992
  • "Musicians Passionate About Trees," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, September 12, 1992
  • "Wildlife Corridor Faces Extinction," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, September 19, 1992
  • "Irradiation Fears Go Beyond Food Safety," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, September 27, 1992
  • "Photographer Crusades To Preserve Nature," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, October 3, 1992
  • "Greens Hold Party to Celebrate Possibilities for Next 500 Years," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, October 10, 1992
  • "Compost Benefits States Sandy Soil," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, October 25, 1992
  • "Stewards of the Land on the Lookout For Pollution," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, November 8, 1992
  • "Solar/electric Chevy truck charges into Gainesville," Kiki Carter, The Tampa Tribune, December 6, 1992

External links[edit]

  • Kiki Carter: official band website of the band, dancing Light [1]
  • The Gainesville Sun index: catalogued by the Alachua County Library [2]
  • Minnesota Public Radio, Minnewiki, The Minnesota Music Encyclopedia [3]
  • Campaign to create a US Department of Peace [4]