Kilmurry Ibrickane

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Kilmurry Ibrickane
Cill Mhuire Uí Bhreacáin
Civil parish
Kilmurry Ibrickane is located in Ireland
Kilmurry Ibrickane
Kilmurry Ibrickane
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 52°47′59″N 9°27′16″W / 52.799722°N 9.454444°W / 52.799722; -9.454444
Country Ireland
Province Munster
County County Clare
Government
 • Dáil Éireann Clare
Time zone WET (UTC+0)
 • Summer (DST) IST (WEST) (UTC-1)

Kilmurry Ibrickane (Irish: Cill Mhuire Uí Bhreacáin[1]) is the name of a civil parish in County Clare, Ireland,[2] and an ecclesiastical parish in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Killaloe. The parish contains the tiny settlement of Kilmurry which was the location of the church before the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland.[3] Main settlements in the parish are Mullagh, Coore and Quilty. The parish is also known for the GAA club, Kilmurry Ibrickane GAA.[4]

Catholic parish[edit]

History[edit]

It is unknown when the parish Kilmurry Ibrickane came into existence. For a long period is was ministered together with the parish of Kilfarboy (Milltown Malbay).[5] The "Register of Priests" in 1704 mentioned Fr. Teige and Fr. Francis Shannon as priests in respectively Kilfarboy and Kilmurry Ibrickane, but according to Ó Murchadha, there is little doubt that they in fact acted as priest and curate for both parishes.[6] Francis Shannon was officiating both in Kilfarboy and Kilmurry Ibrickane by 1715.[7]

In the 1830s, the population in the combined parishes had risen to about 20.000 people, so a split became necessary. The priest and his curate, the brothers Anthony and Patrick McGuane, started building two identical churches in Milltown Malbay and Mullagh, but the Night of the Big Wind prevented completion of the church in Mullagh. The planned tower and spire were never built. When Fr. Anthony McGuane died in 1839, his brother Fr. Patrick became the first parish priest of Kilfarboy. A cousin of them, Fr. E.B. (Edmund) Barry, became the first parish priest of Kilmurry Ibrickane.[6]

Fr. Thomas Moloney, then curate at Kilmurry Ibrickane, was a supporter of the Young Ireland movement. During the Great Famine he worked tirelessly to get the word out of the disaster happening in Ireland, through newspapers and political contacts.[8] Today the Catholic parish is known as Mullagh, after the principal settlement.[7]

Churches[edit]

Our Lady Star of the Sea Church, Quilty

Churches are:[9]

List of parish priests[edit]

Parish priests were:[12]

  • Rev. Edmund Barry (1839-1860)
  • Rev. Patrick Moran (1860-1875)
  • Rev. James Cahir (1876-1914)
  • Rev. John Glynn (1914-1930)
  • Rev. Patrick Scanlon (1930-1932)
  • Rev. Patrick J. O'Halloran (1932-1947)
  • Rev. Peter Ryan (1948-1961)
  • Rev. Jeremiah Cahir (1961-1966)
  • Rev. Henry Kenny (1966-1969)
  • Rev. John Greed (1969-1972)
  • Rev. Thomas Murphy (1972-1980)
  • Rev. Michael Green (1981-1986)
  • Rev. Timothy Tuohy (1986-2001)
  • Rev. Patrick Larkin (2002–2014)

Civil parish[edit]

The parish is part of the historic barony of Ibrickane. In 1837, it was co-extensive with the parish of the Established Church and of the Roman Catholic Church.[13]

Townlands[edit]

The parish is divided into 52 townlands:[14]

  • Annagh
  • Ballymackea Beg
  • Ballymackea More
  • Caherrush
  • Carrowduff
  • Carrowlagan
  • Carrownagry North
  • Carrownagry South
  • Cloghauninchy
  • Cloghaunnatinny
  • Cloonadrum
  • Cloonlaheen East
  • Cloonlaheen Middle
  • Cloonlaheen West
  • Coor East
  • Coor West
  • Craggaun
  • Craggaknock East
  • Craggaknock West
  • Creevagh
  • Derreen
  • Doolough
  • Doonogan
  • Doonsallagh East
  • Doonsallagh West
  • Drummin
  • Emlagh
  • Finnor Beg
  • Finnor More
  • Kilclehaun
  • Killernan
  • Knockanalban
  • Knocknahila Beg
  • Knocknahila More North
  • Knocknahila More South
  • Knockloskeraun
  • Lissyneillan
  • Molosky
  • Moyglass Beg
  • Moyglass More
  • Mutton Island
  • Quilty East
  • Quilty West
  • Rineroe
  • Seafield
  • Shanavogh East
  • Shanavogh West
  • Shandrum
  • Treanmanagh
  • Tromracastle
  • Tromra East
  • Tromra West

Note[edit]

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 52°47′55.06″N 9°25′58.84″W / 52.7986278°N 9.4330111°W / 52.7986278; -9.4330111