Kim Yeo-jin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This is a Korean name; the family name is Kim.
Kim Yeo-jin
Kim Yeo-jin.jpg
Born (1972-06-24) June 24, 1972 (age 42)
Masan, South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea
Education Ewha Womans University - German Language and Literature
Occupation Actress, activist
Years active 1995–present
Agent Momma Entertainment
Religion Catholic
Spouse(s) Kim Jin-min[1]
Korean name
Hangul 김여진
Hanja 金麗珍
Revised Romanization Gim Yeo-jin
McCune–Reischauer Kim Yŏchin

Kim Yeo-jin (born June 24, 1972) is a South Korean actress and activist. Kim made her acting debut in the stage play What Do Women Live For in 1995, and has since remained active in film and television, drawing praise for her supporting roles in Im Sang-soo's Girls' Night Out (1998), Lee Chang-dong's Peppermint Candy (2000), and Im Kwon-taek's Chi-hwa-seon (2002).[2][3]

Kim is known for being actively engaged in various rallies and civic group activities, attracting public attention to controversial social and political issues, including efforts to reinstate laid-off shipbuilders at Hanjin Heavy Industries, calls to lower university tuition fees, and opposition to the Four Major Rivers Project.[4][5][6][7][8] She often expresses her opinions on social networking service Twitter.[9][10][11][12][13]

Because of her outspokenness, MBC banned Kim in 2011 (she was originally scheduled to appear as a "progressive" panelist on the current affairs radio show Sohn Suk-hee's Spotlight), which led to prominent figures from academic, literary and media circles to call for a boycott of the network's programs.[14][15][16]

Kim has also campaigned for liberal politicians Roh Moo-hyun, Moon Jae-in and Park Won-soon.[17]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Television series[edit]

Theater[edit]

Books[edit]

  • 배운 녀자 (2011)
  • 내가 걸은만큼 내 인생이다 (2011)
  • Love Song (2012)

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sunwoo, Carla (15 February 2012). "Kim Yeo-jin tweets motherhood joy". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  2. ^ Cho, Chung-un (16 June 2011). "Actress takes up social activism". The Korea Herald. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  3. ^ Elley, Derek (22 November 1998). "Review: Girls' Night Out". Variety. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  4. ^ Kim, Rahn (13 June 2011). "Actress Kim faces probe over participation in strike". The Korea Times. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  5. ^ Kim, Rahn (16 June 2011). "Actress support draws public attention to female laborers fight". The Korea Times. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  6. ^ Heur, Mi-kyung (16 June 2011). "Actress tweets visit and arrest at labor sit-in site". The Hankyoreh. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  7. ^ Park, Hyun-jung (18 June 2011). "Actress’s aerial protest tweet picked up by international news organizations". The Hankyoreh. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  8. ^ Lim, Ji-sun (3 June 2011). "Prominent figures join 'half-price tuition' demonstrations". The Hankyoreh. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  9. ^ Song, Pyeong-in (20 July 2011). "Celebrity activists". The Dong-a Ilbo. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  10. ^ Kim, Yoon-mi (21 June 2011). "More celebrities get into social activism". The Korea Herald. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  11. ^ Song, Pyeong-in (12 November 2011). "Polichic". The Dong-a Ilbo. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  12. ^ "Many Young People Believe Online Rumors". The Chosun Ilbo. 10 November 2011. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  13. ^ Kwon, Seung-joon (7 March 2012). "Celebrities with a True Social Conscience". The Chosun Ilbo. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  14. ^ "Editorial: Kim Yoh-jin banned at MBC". The Hankyoreh. 16 July 2011. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  15. ^ Kim, Rahn (19 July 2011). "MBC draws fire for ban on entertainer activists". The Korea Times. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  16. ^ Choi, Sung-jin (19 July 2011). "Following Kim Yoh-jin ban, prominent figures boycott MBC". The Hankyoreh. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  17. ^ Heo, Jae-hyun; Choi, Yu-bin (21 December 2012). "Liberal voters lick their wounds after election disappointment". The Hankyoreh. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  18. ^ Lee, Hyo-won (27 January 2011). "Missing Children case turns into stilted drama". The Korea Times. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  19. ^ Oh, Jean (26 December 2008). "Drama market gets globalized, theme-driven". The Korea Herald. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 
  20. ^ Lee, Claire (22 November 2011). "Korea's Vagina Monologues celebrates 10 years". The Korea Herald. Retrieved 3 April 2015. 

External links[edit]