Kim Zetter

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Kim Zetter is an American freelance journalist in Oakland, California. She has written on a wide variety of subjects from the Kabbalah to dining out in San Francisco to Israel to cryptography and electronic voting, and her work has been published in newspapers and magazines all over the world, including the Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Jerusalem Post, San Jose Mercury News, Detroit Free Press, and the Sydney Morning Herald. She has been a staff reporter at Wired, a writer and editor at PC World, and a guest on NPR and CNN.

She is probably best known for her reporting for Wired News, where she has written over 100 articles. Some of her work, such as that dealing with the security problems of electronic voting machines,[1] and public interest in the CIA's Kryptos sculpture,[2] introduced stories that were not covered by the mainstream press until months later. Her 2003–2004 series of articles on electronic voting won several awards, and she was shortlisted for the prestigious Investigative Reporters and Editors Award.

Zetter has interviewed and written about many notable people including sculptor Jim Sanborn (creator of the CIA's Kryptos sculpture),[3] Ed Scheidt (Chairman of the CIA's Cryptographic Center),[4] Mike Lynn (about the Cisco scandal in 2005), Australian film director Baz Luhrmann,[5] United States Assistant Attorney General Viet Dinh (creator of the Patriot Act), [6] and the famous cryptographer Bruce Schneier.[7]

Though born in the United States, she got her start as a journalist in Israel, when she was living there for three years. Some of her first articles were written for the Jerusalem Post. She speaks English and Hebrew, and her book on the Kabbalah has been published in multiple languages.

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