Kimberly Johnson

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Kimberly Johnson (born 1971) is an American poet and Renaissance scholar.

Life[edit]

Johnson was raised in West Jordan, Utah. She earned her MA in 1995 from the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars, her MFA in 1997 Iowa Writers' Workshop, and a PhD in 2003 from University of California, Berkeley.[1][2]

She teaches courses in creative writing and Renaissance literature at Brigham Young University (BYU). Johnson's academic interests include lyric poetry, John Milton, and John Donne.[3]

Her work has appeared recently in The New Yorker,[4] Slate,[5][6] The Iowa Review, 32 Poems,[7] and The Yale Review, and her translations from Latin and Greek have been published in literary and academic journals. She has also published a number of scholarly articles on seventeenth-century literature.

She has edited a collection of essays on Renaissance literature, and an online archive of John Donne's complete sermons.[8]

She is married to poet and essayist Jay Hopler.[1]

Awards[edit]

In 2005, she was awarded a Creative Writing Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts to support the completion of her second collection, A Metaphorical God.[9] In 2011, she received a Guggenheim Fellowship.[1]

Works[edit]

Poetry[edit]

Criticism[edit]

  • Made Flesh: Sacrament and Poetics in Post-Reformation England, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014, ISBN 978-0-81224-588-2

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ben Fulton (May 12, 2011). "Line by line, Utah poet garners a Guggenheim". The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved May 14, 2011. 
  2. ^ http://news.byu.edu/archive11-may-guggenheim.aspx
  3. ^ http://humanities.byu.edu/directory/kj264/
  4. ^ http://www.newyorker.com/fiction/poetry/2011/01/03/110103po_poem_johnson
  5. ^ "Marking the Lambs" Slate, Nov. 2006
  6. ^ "Catapult", Slate, March 15, 2011
  7. ^ http://www.32poems.com/issues/kimberly-johnson-sonnet
  8. ^ John Donne's Complete Sermons
  9. ^ http://www.nea.gov/features/writers/writersCMS/writer.php?id=05_09
  10. ^ Boyd Tonkin (5 January 2010). "Georgics, By Virgil, translated by Kimberly Johnson". The Independent. Retrieved 10 May 2011. 

External links[edit]

Readings