Kimmswick, Missouri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kimmswick, Missouri
City
Location of Kimmswick, Missouri
Location of Kimmswick, Missouri
Coordinates: 38°22′0″N 90°21′50″W / 38.36667°N 90.36389°W / 38.36667; -90.36389Coordinates: 38°22′0″N 90°21′50″W / 38.36667°N 90.36389°W / 38.36667; -90.36389
Country United States
State Missouri
County Jefferson
Area[1]
 • Total 0.23 sq mi (0.60 km2)
 • Land 0.23 sq mi (0.60 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 411 ft (125 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 157
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 157
 • Density 682.6/sq mi (263.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 63053
Area code(s) 636
FIPS code 29-38684[4]
GNIS feature ID 0720590 [5]

Kimmswick is a city in Jefferson County, Missouri, United States. The population was 157 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Kimmswick is a fourth class city located at 38°22′0″N 90°21′50″W / 38.36667°N 90.36389°W / 38.36667; -90.36389. It is next to the Mississippi River.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.23 square miles (0.60 km2), all of it land.[1]

Nearby Imperial was once known as West Kimmswick.

History[edit]

Kimmswick was founded in 1859[6] by dry goods merchant Theodore Kimms, who named the town after himself. He laid the town out on 160 acres (0.6 km2) on land purchased from the widow of Captain George Waters. The area was settled by German immigrant stonecutters and wealthy St. Louisans.

There are numerous salt springs in the area, which were used by Native Americans as a source of salt. These salt springs also attracted prehistoric animals; nearby is the Mastodon State Historic Site, where bones of this extinct elephant were discovered. A spa and resort area in Kimmswick was a popular steamboat daytrip destination for Saint Louisians in the late 19th century.

By the early 1970s, the town's existence was threatened by construction of Interstate 55 and flooding of the Mississippi River. The Kimmswick Historical Society, founded in 1969, was instrumental in saving the town and preserving its historic architecture. The town is now a popular tourist destination, and features numerous antique and craft stores and country-style restaurants. The Blue Owl is the most well known restaurant as it was once mentioned by Oprah in her O magazine. The town survived the Flood of 1993 by the efforts of many volunteers and government agencies. Kimmswick defeated a proposed casino to be built on the site, fearing that gambling would damage the town's character.

Kimmswick's Applebutter Festival is famous throughout the Midwest. It typically takes place in late October.

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 157 people, 56 households, and 41 families residing in the city. The population density was 682.6 inhabitants per square mile (263.6 /km2). There were 68 housing units at an average density of 295.7 per square mile (114.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.4% White, 1.3% African American, 6.4% Asian, and 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.3% of the population.

There were 56 households of which 39.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 16.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.8% were non-families. 23.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.34.

The median age in the city was 32.5 years. 26.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.1% were from 25 to 44; 28.6% were from 45 to 64; and 8.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 45.9% male and 54.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 94 people, 35 households, and 24 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,186.5 people per square mile (453.7/km²). There were 36 housing units at an average density of 454.4 per square mile (173.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 89.36% White, 1.06% African American, and 9.57% from two or more races.

There were 35 households out of which 22.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.3% were married couples living together, 17.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.6% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.24.

In the city the population was spread out with 21.3% under the age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 17.0% from 45 to 64, and 23.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 84.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $54,688, and the median income for a family was $66,250. Males had a median income of $44,250 versus $34,375 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,359. There were 3.6% of families and 7.0% of the population living below the poverty line, including 8.3% of under eighteens and 21.4% of those over 64.

Education[edit]

Kimmswick is within the Windsor C-1 School District.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "Kimmswick". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2009-05-03. 
  6. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 181. 
  7. ^ "SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP (2010 CENSUS): Jefferson County, MO" (Archive). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on June 13, 2014.

External links[edit]