Kincoppal School

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Kincoppal-Rose Bay, School of the Sacred Heart
Kincoppal Rose Bay crest. Source: www.krb.nsw.edu.au (Kincoppal website)
Latin: Cor Unum
One Heart
Location
Rose Bay, New South Wales
Australia Australia
Coordinates 33°51′45″S 151°16′17″E / 33.86250°S 151.27139°E / -33.86250; 151.27139Coordinates: 33°51′45″S 151°16′17″E / 33.86250°S 151.27139°E / -33.86250; 151.27139
Information
Type Private, Single-sex, Day and Boarding
Denomination Roman Catholic
Established 1882 (Convent of the Sacred Heart); 1909 (Kincoppal); 1971 (Kincoppal-Rose Bay)
Chairman Bryan Curtin
Principal Hilary Johnston-Croke
Staff ~90[1]
Enrolment ~905 (K–12)[1]
Colour(s) Navy, Red and White             
Website

Kincoppal-Rose Bay, School of the Sacred Heart (Kincoppal-Rose Bay), is a private, Catholic, day and boarding school predominantly for girls, located in Rose Bay, an eastern suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Established in 1971 through the amalgamation of the Convent of the Sacred Heart and Kincoppal, today the school is non-selective, with a co-educational primary school and a girls only high school, catering for approximately 905 students from Kindergarten to Year 12,[1] including 146 boarders.[2]

Kincoppal Rose bay is a member of an international group of schools conducted by the Society of the Sacred Heart, a Catholic teaching order, established by Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat in France in 1800.[3] The school is also affiliated with the Association of Heads of Independent Schools of Australia (AHISA),[4] the Junior School Heads Association of Australia (JSHAA),[5] the Australian Boarding Schools' Association (ABSA),[6] and is a member of the Association of Heads of Independent Girls' Schools (AHIGS).[7]

History[edit]

Kincoppal traces its origins to the establishment of two schools. The first, the Convent of the Sacred Heart, Rose Bay, was founded in 1882. The other, named Kincoppal was established at Elizabeth Bay in 1909. In 1971 these two schools were amalgamated on the Convent of the Sacred Heart campus and became known as Kincoppal-Rose Bay, School of the Sacred Heart.[3]

In 1882, five religious from the Society of the Sacred Heart travelled from England on the SS Orient to establish a school of the Sacred Heart in Sydney. They selected the residence of Claremont on the Vaucluse, New South Wales peninsula, to begin their task of offering students the educational vision of St. Madeleine Sophie Barat, the founder of their Society.

View from New South Head Road

The original building, leased in 1882 and later purchased by the Society of the Sacred Heart, was a private home, built in 1851. The first permanent school building, completed in 1888, was the five level central facade. The Chapel, a masterpiece by the architect John Horbury Hunt, was begun in 1897 and completed in 1900. Buildings were gradually added to meet the needs of school, community and novitiate. The Secondary school was a full boarding school until the 1960s, when day students were admitted.

The primary day school was located in the main school building until 1951 when an adjoining property, was purchased. The building was set up as a primary school and named Barat-Burn. This building was demolished and replaced with the present Junior school in 1966.

In 1982 the school celebrated the centenary of its foundation and the arrival of the first religious in Australia. To commemorate the occasion Sister Leila Barlow wrote and published "Living Stones", a book reviewing the spirit, tradition and events of the school's first hundred years. In 2007, the school celebrated 125 years of Cor Unum, highlighting its unique history, dynamic present and future visions.

The name 'Kincoppal' literally means 'Horse's Head' in Gaeilge (Irish), the anglicisation of 'ceann' (head) and 'capall' (horse). The school got its name from John Hughes, the original owner of the 'Kincoppal' property at Elizabeth Bay, who named his residence after a rock in Sydney Harbour, that, when visible from a certain view, looks like a horse's head.[8]

Today, Kincoppal comprises a fully co-educational Junior School P-6 for day students, and a Senior School for girls 7-12, with both day and boarding students attending from metropolitan, rural and international destinations.

Principals[edit]

Period Details[7]
1975 – 1990 Sr Anne McGrath
1991 – 2005 Mr Christopher Faisandier
2006 – present Mrs Hilary Johnston-Croke

Campus[edit]

Kincoppal-Rose Bay is situated on a single campus in suburban Rose Bay, overlooking Sydney Harbour. The school features a mix of 19th century and modern buildings, gardens and fields.

Convent of the Sacred Heart, c1930s
The school seen from Rose Bay

Current facilities of the school include:

  • Boarding school Accommodating up to 150 students from Years 7 to 12. Provides dormitory-style accommodation with bed/study cubicles for junior boarders and bed-study rooms which accommodate one or several students for senior boarders. Sheldon House, completed in 1998, provides accommodation for Year 12 students.[2]
  • Chapel A central part of the school and regarded as one of the finest works of famous Architect, John Horbury Hunt. Used by students, staff and the School community for Masses, feast days, weddings and special occasions such as the Vale Mass and the Procession of the Lanterns.[9]
  • Harbour Terrace Located above the school library, this flat roof area has uninterrupted views down Sydney Harbour. Used by students during lunch and recess breaks, and is also the venue for the Vale (graduation) Luncheon.[10]
  • Hughes Centre Used for assemblies, school productions, concerts, examinations and special events. Equipped with an auditorium seating approximately 550 in theatre-style, stage, backstage area, audio/visual system, lighting, heating, grand piano and risers.[11]
  • Junior School Learning Centre Incorporating the Junior School Library, an IT Centre and a drop-in independent learning area with access to IT and print resources.[12]
  • Mary Agnes O'Neil Library Opened 1998. Features separate floors for fiction and research, computer and printing facilities and two seminar rooms.[13]
  • McGuinness Centre A Gymnasium with a fully sprung floor.[14]
  • Maureen Tudehope Centre A multi-purpose centre comprising an auditorium, stage, basketball court, heated indoor pool, fitness centre, dance studio and change room facilities. Used for sporting and recreational activities, whole school assemblies and other special events.
  • Performing Arts Centre Refurbished in 1998. Used by both Junior and Senior students for orchestral and choral rehearsals and performances.[15]
  • Santas' Field A newly opened sports field for Junior school students.[14]
  • Sheldon Swimming Pool A 25-metre outdoor pool, situated on the harbour side of the School.[14]
  • Sports Field Including 5 tennis courts and a large, flat area for competitive track and field events.[14]

Houses[edit]

There are four primary houses at Kincoppal Rose Bay, all of which originate from aboriginal words. Each year separate junior school and high school carnivals are held, these are for both swimming and athletics, and all students compete for their house. There are house captains in both the junior school and high school, who arrange cheers for the students to participate in. At the carnivals there is a spirit cup (for house cheers) and a points cup (the winner of the most sports at the carnival. In house colours students also participate in interhouse singing competitions.

  • Tangara - (Blue and white) Meaning 'To go' in the Aboriginal dialect, the mascot for Tangara is the beetle.
  • Arakoola -(Green and gold) The mascot for this team is the frog, and in the aboriginal (arakoola) means to be in front
  • Murramai- (Red and green) The mascot for this team is a rabbit, the name originated from an indigenous word meaning/describing a crayfish.
  • Kungala- (Yellow and black)The mascot for this team is a tiger, and the aboriginal name translated to English means to shout and listen.

In the boarding school, there are three primary houses, all of which are named after a significant contributor to the Society of the Sacred Heart. Throughout the school year, inter-house competitions are undertaken, where all girls wear their respective house shirt. During first term, a 'In-Weekend' occurs, where all boarders must stay in the boarding house for the entire weekend. It is here that the first competition takes place with a trivia night including all boarders from years 7-12. This contributes to the awarding of house points, to which the winning house is given a trophy at the end of the year.

In popular culture[edit]

Kincoppal-Rose Bay has been used as a set for a number of films including Looking for Alibrandi and Our Lips Are Sealed. The school has also featured in numerous television series', including "Spirited (TV series)" and "Spyforce" TV series.

Notable alumnae[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Annual Report 2006" (PDF). Publications. Kincoppal-Rose Bay. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-08-31. Retrieved 2008-02-01. 
  2. ^ a b "The Boarding School". Boarding. Kincoppal-Rose Bay. Archived from the original on 2007-07-11. Retrieved 2007-08-06. 
  3. ^ a b "History & Philosophy". About Us. Kincoppal-Rose Bay. Archived from the original on 2007-10-18. Retrieved 2008-02-01. 
  4. ^ "New South Wales". Schools Directory. Association of Heads of Independent Schools of Australia. 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-01. [dead link]
  5. ^ "JSHAA New South Wales Directory of Members". New South Wales Branch. Junior School Heads' Association of Australia. 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-01. 
  6. ^ "Kincoppal - Rose Bay". Schools. Australian Boarding Schools' Association. Archived from the original on 2007-11-17. Retrieved 2008-02-01. 
  7. ^ a b c "Heads of New South Wales Independent Girls' Schools". About AHIGS. Association of Heads of Independent Girls Schools. Retrieved 2007-12-02. 
  8. ^ Cunneen, Chris (2005). "Hughes, John (1825 - 1885)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Supplementary (Online ed.). Melbourne: Melbourne University Press. pp. 190–191. Retrieved 2007-08-07. 
  9. ^ "Chapel". Facilities. Kincoppal-Rose Bay. Archived from the original on 2007-08-31. Retrieved 2007-08-11. 
  10. ^ "Harbour Terrace". Facilities. Kincoppal-Rose Bay. Archived from the original on 2007-08-31. Retrieved 2007-08-11. 
  11. ^ "Hughes Centre". Facilities. Kincoppal-Rose Bay. Archived from the original on 2007-08-31. Retrieved 2007-08-11. 
  12. ^ "Junior School Learning Centre". Facilities. Kincoppal-Rose Bay. Archived from the original on 2007-08-31. Retrieved 2007-08-11. 
  13. ^ "Mary Agnes O'Neil Library". Facilities. Kincoppal-Rose Bay. Archived from the original on 2007-08-31. Retrieved 2007-08-11. 
  14. ^ a b c d "Sport Facilities". Facilities. Kincoppal-Rose Bay. Archived from the original on 2007-08-31. Retrieved 2007-08-11. 
  15. ^ "Performing Arts Centre". Facilities. Kincoppal-Rose Bay. Archived from the original on 2007-08-31. Retrieved 2007-08-11. 
  16. ^ Roberts, Alan (1988). "Simpson, Helen de Guerry (1897 - 1940)". Australian Dictionary of Biography 11 (Online ed.). Melbourne: Melbourne University Press. pp. 611–612. Retrieved 2007-08-07. 
  17. ^ Suzannah Pearce, ed. (2006-11-17). "Turnbull, Lucy". Who's Who in Australia Live!. North Melbourne, Vic: Crown Content Pty Ltd. 
  18. ^ Green, Jonathan (2005-03-30). "Famous alumni on Latham's hit list". Politics (Crikey). Retrieved 2007-08-06. 
  19. ^ Stewart, Meg (2007). Autobiography of My Mother. Random House. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Barlow, L. 1982. Living Stones: Convent of the Sacred Heart, Rose Bay 1882-1982. Kincoppal-Rose Bay School, Rose Bay, NSW. ISBN 0-9593096-0-8.
  • Frost, P. 1973. The Kincoppal Story. Sydney.

External links[edit]