King's Carriage House

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King's Carriage House
Restaurant information
Established 1995
Current owner(s) Elizabeth King and Paul Farrell
Chef Elizabeth King[2]
Food type New American cuisine
Dress code Jackets optional
Street address 251 East 82nd Street (between Second Avenue and Third Avenue), on the Upper East Side in Manhattan
City New York City
State New York
Postal code/ZIP 10028
Country United States
Coordinates 40°46′32″N 73°57′14″W / 40.775551°N 73.953967°W / 40.775551; -73.953967
Reservations Suggested[1]
Website www.kingscarriagehouse.com

King's Carriage House is an New American cuisine restaurant, tea room, and wine bar located at 251 East 82nd Street (between Second Avenue and Third Avenue), on the Upper East Side in Manhattan, in New York City.[3][4]

It opened in 1995.[5] It is owned by Elizabeth King (a chef) and Paul Farrell (who runs the dining room).[1][6]

Menu[edit]

The restaurant serves afternoon tea from 3 to 4 PM, for which reservations are required.[3][7][8][9] The New American cuisine menu includes items such as grilled filet mignon, roasted breast of duck, roast goose, and pheasant potpie.[1] [6]

Restaurant[edit]

The small, cozy four-room restaurant is an 1870s former carriage house in a romantic duplex, modeled after an Irish manor house and suggesting an English country house.[2][3][5][6][7][10] The restaurant has antique wood furniture, tartan curtains, and antique silver teapots.[5] It has three dining rooms: the Hunt Room, with a mural painted by a nearby parish's priest; the Red Room, with old paintings; and the Willow Room, with antiques.[6]

The attire is "jackets optional".[1]

Reviews[edit]

In 2013, Zagats gave the restaurant a food rating of 22, and a decor rating of 25.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "King's Carriage House". Great Restaurants Magazine. January 1, 2004. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Peg Moore (January 12, 2013). "Gracious dining in New York". Charleston Mercury. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d Kings' Carriage House | Manhattan | Restaurant Menus and Reviews. Zagat. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Kings' Carriage House". Kingscarriagehouse.com. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c Lois Smith Brady (March 3, 1996). "Vows; Elizabeth King and Paul Farrell". New York Times. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d Matthew, Kirsten (January 10, 2010). "Home for dinner". New York Post. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 
  7. ^ a b Jayne Young, Sheridan Becker (2001). Savvy in the City: New York City: A "See Jane Go" Guide to City Living. Macmillan. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 
  8. ^ Bo Niles (2003). The New York Book of Tea: Where to Take Tea and Buy Tea & Teaware. Rizzoli. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 
  9. ^ Gerry Frank (2007). Gerry Frank's Where to Find It, Buy It, Eat It in New York. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 
  10. ^ Jeffrey Slonim (September 11, 1998). "Going Duck Hunting". New York Post. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 

External links[edit]