Kingharia

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The Kingharia are a Muslim community found in the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. They are also known as Panwariya.[1]

Origin[edit]

The Kingharia are a community of singers and beggers. Their name is derived from the word kingri, which is a type of a violin. The word Kingharia literally means someone who plays the kingri. They claim to be Abbasi Shaikh, and claim descent from Abbas, the uncle of the Prophet Mohammad. The community is found mainly in Awadh, with concentrations in Lucknow, Bahraich, Barabanki and Gorakhpur. According to some traditions, they are a branch of the Mirasi community. They are further divided into seven clans, referred to as biradaris, which claim descent from a common ancestor. The seven clan include the Kingharia proper, the Bankhata, the Sewak, the Jogi, the Kapariya, the Atit and the Baanchhariya. Each of these clans is of equal status, and intermarry.[2]

Present circumstances[edit]

The Kingharia are a landless community. Their traditional occupation was singing of traditional folks songs. They would visit the home of wealthy Hindu and Muslims on special occasions such as a birth of a child. Many of the community have abandoned their traditional occupation, and are now taking to cultivation. A larger number are agricultural labourers. The Kingharia are Sunni, although a few especially in Lucknow are Shia. They are strictly endogamous, and marry close kin. Their customs are similar to other Muslims in the Awadh region.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ People of India Uttar Pradesh Volume XLII Part Two edited by A Hasan & J C Das pages 824 to 827 Manohar Publications
  2. ^ People of India Uttar Pradesh Volume XLII Part Two edited by A Hasan & J C Das pages 824 to 827 Manohar Publications
  3. ^ People of India Uttar Pradesh Volume XLII Part Two edited by A Hasan & J C Das pages 824 to 827 Manohar Publications