Kings Langley railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kings Langley National Rail
Kings Langley
Location
Place Kings Langley
Local authority Three Rivers
Grid reference TL080019
Operations
Station code KGL
Managed by London Midland
Number of platforms 4
Live arrivals/departures and station information
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2004/05   0.383 million
2005/06 Increase 0.446 million
2006/07 Increase 0.509 million
2007/08 Increase 0.596 million
2008/09 Decrease 0.592 million
2009/10 Decrease 0.574 million
2010/11 Increase 0.598 million
2011/12 Increase 0.630 million
2012/13 Increase 0.669 million
History
Key dates Opened 1839 (1839)
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Kings Langley from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
Portal icon UK Railways portal

Kings Langley railway station is just under the M25 motorway at Junction 20. It serves the village of Kings Langley, and the nearby villages of Abbots Langley and Hunton Bridge. The station is 21 miles (34 km) north west of London Euston on the West Coast Main Line. Services to Kings Langley are operated by and the station is managed by London Midland.

The station was opened in 1839. From 1909 the station was known as Kings Langley & Abbots Langley, becoming Kings Langley on 6 May 1974.[1]

Services[edit]

Monday to Saturday a half-hourly service to London Euston southbound and Tring (Saturdays Milton Keynes Central) northbound. Evenings and Sundays there is an hourly in each direction. Sometimes there is an hourly service to and from Birmingham New Street stops here.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Apsley   London Midland
West Coast Main Line
  Watford Junction

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • On 14 March 1935, an express passenger train was brought to a halt at Kings Langley due to a defective vacuum brake. Due to a signalman's error a milk train ran into its rear. A freight train then ran into the wreckage.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Slater, J.N., ed. (July 1974). "Notes and News: Stations renamed by LMR". Railway Magazine (London: IPC Transport Press Ltd) 120 (879): 363. ISSN 0033-8923. 
  2. ^ Trevena, Arthur (1980). Trains in Trouble. Vol. 1. Redruth: Atlantic Books. p. 38. ISBN 0-906899-01-X. 

External links[edit]

Blackpool - London express in 1953

Coordinates: 51°42′22″N 0°26′17″W / 51.706°N 0.438°W / 51.706; -0.438