Kings Mountain National Military Park

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Kings Mountain National Military Park
Kings Mountain Monument
Kings Mountain National Military Park is located in South Carolina
Kings Mountain National Military Park
Location York / Cherokee counties, South Carolina
Nearest city Blacksburg, South Carolina
Coordinates 35°8′16″N 81°23′22″W / 35.13778°N 81.38944°W / 35.13778; -81.38944Coordinates: 35°8′16″N 81°23′22″W / 35.13778°N 81.38944°W / 35.13778; -81.38944
Built 1780
Architect Mckim, Mead & White; Howser, Henry (NPS)
Architectural style Modern Movement, Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals, Federal
Governing body National Park Service
NRHP Reference #

66000079

[1]
Added to NRHP October 15, 1966
Kings Mountain National Military Park
Area 3,945 acres (15.96 km²)
Established March 3, 1931
Visitors 268,394 (in 2005)
Governing body National Park Service

Kings Mountain National Military Park is a National Military Park near Blacksburg, South Carolina, along the North Carolina/South Carolina border.[2][3] The park commemorates the Battle of Kings Mountain, a pivotal and significant victory by American Patriots over American Loyalists during the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.[1]

Historical background[edit]

The Battle of Kings Mountain was fought on October 7, 1780, and destroyed the left wing of Lord Cornwallis' army, effectively ending Loyalist ascendance in the Carolinas. The victory halted the British advance into North Carolina, forced Lord Cornwallis to retreat from Charlotte into South Carolina, and gave General Nathanael Greene the opportunity to reorganize the American Army. The age of the soldiers engaged in the battle here ranged up to 50 years old, with Billy Rowland being the youngest known to have lost his life at 15 years of age .

Establishment[edit]

Kings Mountain National Military Park was established on March 3, 1931 by an act of Congress: "in order to commemorate the Battle of Kings Mountain." The park is the terminus of the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail commemorating the route of the Patriot army from over the Appalachian Mountains to the battle.

The park adjoins Kings Mountain State Park, which offers camping, picnicking and a "living history" farm. It is approximately 30 miles south of Charlotte, North Carolina and approximately 60 miles North of Greenville, South Carolina. Kings Mountain can be seen from I-85 North for many miles.

Historic trail[edit]

A one and a half mile paved trail leads from the visitors' center around the base of the mountain along the Patriot lines and ascends to the crest where the Loyalists were positioned. The trail passes several monuments, large and small, the earliest dating from 1815, as well as Patrick Ferguson's grave, giving a good sense of the battleground. The trail is moderately steep in places. As part of the NPS' Centennial Initiative, the trail will be rehabilitated to eliminate the steeper sections of the trail, making it accessible to everyone.[4]

Mountain Peaks[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-15. 
  2. ^ Anderson, James J. (December 16, 1974). "Kings Mountain National Military Park" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. Retrieved 8 September 2012. 
  3. ^ "Kings Mountain National Military Park, York County (S.C. Hwy. 161, Bethany vicinity)". National Register Properties in South Carolina. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 16 September 2012. 
  4. ^ Bomar, Mary A. (August 2007). "Summary of Park Centennial Strategies" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2008-02-15. 

External links[edit]