Kinnerly Peak

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Kinnerly Peak
Kinnerly Peak.jpg
Elevation 9,949 ft (3,032 m)[1]  NAVD 88
Prominence 1,465 ft (447 m)[1]
Location
Location Flathead County, Montana, U.S.
Range Livingston Range
Coordinates 48°57′22″N 114°09′55″W / 48.95611°N 114.16528°W / 48.95611; -114.16528Coordinates: 48°57′22″N 114°09′55″W / 48.95611°N 114.16528°W / 48.95611; -114.16528[2]
Topo map USGS Kintla Peak, MT
Climbing
First ascent 1937 by Norman Clyde, Ed Hall, Richard K. Hill and Braeme Gigos
Easiest route class 4 or easy Class 5

Kinnerly Peak (9,949 feet / 3,032 metres) is located in the Livingston Range, Glacier National Park in the U.S. state of Montana.[3] It is approximately 1 mile (1.6 km) north of Kintla Peak, the highest peak in the Livingston Range, and 3 miles (4.8 km) south of the Canadian border. Both peaks are in the remote northwest corner of the park. Kinnerly Peak is the eighth tallest peak in Glacier National Park.[1]

Kinnerly Peak is notable for its huge north face, which rises steeply from Upper Kintla Lake. From the lake to the summit is an elevation gain of 5,573 feet (1,699 m) in approximately a horizontal 1 mile (1.6 km).

The first recorded ascent of Kinnerly Peak was made by a Sierra Club party led by the noted mountaineer Norman Clyde, in 1937.[4] The standard climbing route ascends the northwest face, starting from the south shore of Upper Kintla Lake. It involves a large amount of elevation gain, mostly by scrambling, but with some exposed and mildly technical sections (Class 4 or easy Class 5). Other routes exist on the southeast and southwest faces.[5]:84-89

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Kinnerly Peak, Montana". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2010-08-08. 
  2. ^ "Kinnerly Peak". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2010-08-08. 
  3. ^ "Kinnerly Peak, Montana" (Map). TopoQuest (USGS Quad). Retrieved 2010-08-08. 
  4. ^ Los Angeles Times September 12, 1937, p. G2
  5. ^ Edwards, J. Gordon (1995). A Climber's Guide to Glacier National Park. Falcon Press. ISBN 0-87842-177-7.