Kip Wells

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Kip Wells
KipWells.jpg
Wells with the Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1977-04-21) April 21, 1977 (age 37)
Houston, Texas
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 2, 1999 for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
August 1, 2012 for the San Diego Padres
Career statistics
Win–loss record 69–103
Earned run average 4.71
Strikeouts 963
Teams

Robert "Kip" Wells (born April 21, 1977) is a former American professional baseball pitcher. In his Major League Baseball career, he played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Texas Rangers, St. Louis Cardinals, Colorado Rockies, Kansas City Royals, Washington Nationals, Cincinnati Reds and San Diego Padres.

High school career[edit]

Wells attended Elkins High School in Missouri City, Texas and was a baseball star and an honor roll student. In baseball, he won All-State and All-America honors after his Senior year (1995).[1] He was drafted by the Milwaukee Brewers in the 58th round of the 1995 Major League Baseball Draft, but did not sign with the Brewers. Instead, he went to Baylor University.

College career[edit]

He posted a career record of 21-14 for the Baylor Bears with a 5.17 ERA and 288 strikeouts in three collegiate seasons and was 1998 2nd Team All-America, 1998 Big 12 1st Team, 1998 All-Region, 1999 Pre Season All America 2nd Team. He also played with the Brewster Whitecaps in the Cape Cod League during the summer of 1997.[2] He went 5-6 with a 1.92 ERA, 49 strikeouts and five saves to earn the league's Outstanding Pro Prospect Award.

Pro career[edit]

Chicago White Sox[edit]

Wells was the first round (16th overall) draft pick of the Chicago White Sox in the 1998 Major League Baseball Draft. He made his first major league appearance with the White Sox the following year. In his debut against the Detroit Tigers, Wells went 5.1 innings, giving up 6 hits, 2 runs and 1 earned run while walking 2 and striking out 4 for his first Major League victory[3]

Pittsburgh Pirates[edit]

After the 2001 season, in which he split time between the starting rotation and the bullpen, Wells was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates.

As of the end of the 2005 season, Wells had a 55-69 record and a 4.36 ERA after 188 games over the course of seven seasons. Wells led the league in losses in 2005, going 8-18 on a Pirates team that went 67-95.

On March 1, 2006, Wells announced he would have surgery to remove a blood clot in his right arm.[4] The surgery was performed on March 6, and he returned to the field on June 19, 2006.

Texas Rangers[edit]

At the trade deadline in 2006, Wells was traded from the Pittsburgh Pirates to the Texas Rangers for Jesse Chavez. [3]

St. Louis Cardinals[edit]

Wells with the Cardinals in 2007.
Wells (right) with former Pirates teammate Mike Gonzalez in 2009.

On November 28, 2006, Kip Wells signed a free agent contract with the St. Louis Cardinals. Kip Wells was said to be the Cardinals starting pitching rotation. He struggled in the first half, going 3-11 with an ERA of 5.92 and getting demoted to the bullpen right before the All-Star break. After the All-Star Break, he was a little better, posting a 4-6 record. He made a promising start against the Florida Marlins on July 18, when he threw eight shutout innings in a 6-0 Cardinals win.[5] At the conclusion of the 2007 season, Wells' record was 7-17 with an ERA of 5.70.

Colorado Rockies[edit]

On December 13, 2007, he signed with the Colorado Rockies. Wells began the 2008 season compiling a 2.29 ERA in ten games with 16 strikeouts as the primary long relief pitcher out of the bullpen. However, on April 30, Wells was placed on the disabled list with blood clots in his pitching hand. On August 10, 2008, the Rockies designated him for assignment and was eventually released.

Kansas City Royals[edit]

Wells signed with the Kansas City Royals on August 18, 2008.[6]

Washington Nationals[edit]

On March 11, 2009, Wells signed a minor league contract with the Washington Nationals.[7] He was brought up to the majors to pitch out of the bullpen, but was ineffective, posting a 6.49 ERA in 26.1 innings before being placed on the disabled list with a right adductor strain on June 2. He was again designated for assignment on June 24.

Wells with the Reds in 2009.

Cincinnati Reds[edit]

On July 9, 2009, Wells signed a deal with Cincinnati Reds Triple A affiliate, the Louisville Bats.[8]

In August Wells was promoted to the Reds once again pitching in major league baseball. The Reds used Wells in the role of a long reliever as well as a fill-in starter.

On February 13, 2010 the Cincinnati Reds re-signed Wells to a minor league deal with an invitation to spring training.[9]

On April 2, 2010, Wells was released by the Reds.

Long Island Ducks[edit]

On July 14, 2010, he signed with the Long Island Ducks.[10]

Arizona Diamondbacks[edit]

On March 24, 2011, Wells signed a minor league deal with the Arizona Diamondbacks.[11] Wells never pitched an inning for the D'Backs AAA system.

Chicago White Sox[edit]

On April 6, 2012, Wells agreed to a minor league deal with the Chicago White Sox but subsequently agreed to a mutual release on April 16, 2012.[12][13]

San Diego Padres[edit]

On May 8, 2012, Wells agreed to a minor league contract with the San Diego Padres.[14] Wells had his contract purchased by the major league club on June 25, 2012. On June 26, Wells started his first major league game since 2009 against the Houston Astros.[15] On August 3, 2012, the Padres designated Wells for assignment. Wells accepted the assignment to Triple-A Tucson after clearing waivers. Wells posted a 2-4 record and a 4.58 ERA in 7 starts for the Padres. The highlight of his time with the Padres was his seven shutout innings in a start in Coors Field, but his 0.95 strikeout-to-walk ratio and 1.4 home runs per nine innings hurt his overall results.[16]

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim[edit]

On April 13, 2013, Wells agreed to a minor league deal with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.[17] Wells was released after 6 starts.

On November 10, 2013, Wells announced his retirement at the age of 36.[18]

References[edit]

External links[edit]