Kiss Me

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"Kiss Me"
Single by Sixpence None the Richer
from the album Sixpence None the Richer
Released August 11, 1998 (US)
April 23, 1999 (UK)
Format CD single
Genre Pop rock, Jangle Pop
Length 3:19 (single version)
3:30 (album version)
Label Squint/Columbia
Writer(s) Matt Slocum
Sixpence None the Richer singles chronology
"Angeltread"
(1995)
"Kiss Me"
(1998)
"There She Goes"
(1999)
Alternative covers
U.S. commercial single

"Kiss Me" is a song recorded by Sixpence None the Richer from their 1997 self-titled album. Released as a single in 1998, it reached #2 on the Billboard US Hot 100. It became the main theme song for the teen film She's All That starring Rachael Leigh Cook.

The song was a worldwide success; it reached number four on both the UK Singles Chart and the Canadian Singles Chart and number one on the Australian singles chart, making it the group's highest-charting single across the world.

The song is also the group's best-selling single in the United States, peaking at number two for one week behind TLC's "No Scrubs". Even though it only reached second place, the song did have great longevity on the chart, spending 16 weeks in the Top Ten and 35 weeks on the chart. At the end of 1999, Billboard ranked the song as the sixth best-selling single of 1999, ahead of a number of other #1 hits and the second highest rank for a song that didn't make it to the top, behind Whitney Houston, Faith Evans, and Kelly Price's "Heartbreak Hotel", which ranked at #4.

Single release[edit]

The year after the release of the album Sixpence None the Richer, "Kiss Me" was released as a single on August 11, 1998. Exactly 3 months after the debut release of the single, The WB's popular teen drama Dawson's Creek played "Kiss Me" as a background music in two of its episodes from Season 2. "Kiss Me" was later included as the first soundtrack on Songs from Dawson's Creek, released on April 27, 1999 and made #7 on the album charts.

The following year after the single's release, Miramax used "Kiss Me" as the main theme song of its sleeper hit romantic comedy film She's All That, whose runaway box office success helped "Kiss Me" to gather more widespread mainstream attention. "Kiss Me" subsequently climbed to #2 on Billboard's Hot 100 list, and stayed among Top 10 for a consecutive 16 weeks. Later that year, BBC used the song as a closing theme during its broadcast coverage of Prince Edward's royal wedding.

The song also featured in the film How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days

Music videos[edit]

The original music video pays tribute to French filmmaker François Truffaut and his film Jules et Jim, made in black and white and recreating many of the classic scenes from the film. Two alternate versions of the video were also released later, which featured the band sitting on a park bench, performing and watching scenes from either She's All That or Dawson's Creek on a portable television or projected on an outdoor screen. Freddie Prinze Jr. and Rachael Leigh Cook appeared in the She's All That version of the video.

The Dawson's Creek version of the video became VH1's number-one video for the entire month of May 1999.

"Kiss Me" as performed by Debbie Scott was featured in the Music and Rhythm Game "Pump it Up: Exceed", which included a music video of a young girl and her pet cat

New Found Glory version[edit]

New Found Glory's music video revolves around a large group of teenagers who construct a tree house out of mattresses, and throw a raucous garden party involving pillow fights and kissing, while the members of the band, along with the members of Paramore perform the song around them. While the bands perform, a young man, played by drummer Chase Dodds of the band Classic Addict, sets off on a mission to kiss as many girls as possible during the party, keeping a tally on his inner left forearm in black pen. After narrowly avoiding kissing a man (whom he mistakes for a girl because of his long hair), Chase attempts to kiss Paramore's lead singer, Hayley Williams, only to have her recognize the tally on his arm, and slap him in the face, knocking him to the ground. He is then set upon by all the girls he has kissed at the party, who then proceed to strip him of his shirt, and tie him to a nearby tree with duct tape. One of the girls tapes his mouth shut, before writing "kiss me" on his chest in black pen. The girls then rejoin the party, leaving Chase tied to the tree.

In this version, to make it more suitable to be sung from a male point of the view, the line "You'll wear those shoes and I will wear that dress" is changed to "I'll wear those shoes and you will wear that dress."

Track listing[edit]

US Christian retail single
  1. "Kiss Me" (radio remix)
  2. "Kiss Me" (album edit)
  3. "Sad But True"
  4. "Kiss Me" (live in Hollywood)
US mainstream retail single
  1. "Kiss Me" (radio remix)
  2. "Love"
UK CD single
  1. "Kiss Me" (radio remix)
  2. "Sad But True"
  3. "Kiss Me" (live in Hollywood)
Japanese CD single
  1. "Kiss Me" (Japanese version)
  2. "Kiss Me" (LP version)
  3. "Kiss Me" (acoustic version)
  4. "I Can't Catch You" (Ben Grosse Remix)
  5. "Love" (Ben Grosse Remix)
  6. "Kiss Me" (instrumental edit)

Charts[edit]

Chart successions[edit]

Preceded by
"No Scrubs" by TLC
Australian ARIA Singles Chart number-one single
June 20, 1999 – July 10, 1999
Succeeded by
"If You Had My Love" by Jennifer Lopez

Covers[edit]

The song has been covered by The Cardigans, Jason Walker, Avril Lavigne,[15] UK R&B singer, Nathan, Lava Lava on their album "Tour Demo", and New Found Glory on their album From the Screen to Your Stereo Part II. The New Found Glory version has been released as a single with a music video.[16] It has also been covered by Singaporean Olivia Ong on her album A Girl Meets Bossa Nova 2, and by American Jewel.[citation needed]. A cover by Debbie Scott appeared in the game Pump It Up! A cover of the song was put in the game Karaoke Revolution. Korean artists have also covered the song, namely IU and Girls' Generation members Jessica Jung and Seohyun. The song was covered on the eighth series of The X Factor by Janet Devlin in Week 7.

References[edit]