Kissinger cables

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Not to be confused with United States diplomatic cables leak.

The Kissinger Cables[1] are 1.7 million United States diplomatic and intelligence records dating from 1973 to 1976 that WikiLeaks republished in April 2013. At the time Henry Kissinger was the United States Secretary of State and National Security Advisor.[2][3][4] They had previously been declassified and released by the U.S. government;[5] all the records are from the National Archives and Record Administration.[6] The cables can be searched for using a search engine provided by WikiLeaks at the Public Library of United States Diplomacy, a special page on the Wikileaks website.[7]

In one of the documents, Kissinger, who authored many of the 205,901 cables that deal with his activities, was quoted as saying "The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer."[8][9]

Quote[edit]

Before the Freedom of Information Act, I used to say at meetings, "The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer." [laughter]

Henry Kissinger, United States Secretary of State, (March 10, 1975)[9][10]

Content[edit]

The Kissinger cables revealed that:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Press Release". Wikileaks. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  2. ^ http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/04/08/wikileaks_70s_diplomatic_reports_includes_kissinger/
  3. ^ Mark Duell (8 April 2013). "WikiLeaks' 'Kissinger Cables': Julian Assange releases 1.7m US diplomatic and intelligence reports". Daily Mail (London). Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  4. ^ "Kissinger Cables: Wikileaks publishes 1.7m US diplomatic documents from 1970s". Telegraph (London). 8 April 2013. Retrieved 8 April 2013. 
  5. ^ http://www.ibtimes.com/wikileaks-going-soft-its-kissinger-cables-release-1178821 International Business Times
  6. ^ http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2013/04/wikileaks-s-kissinger-cables-is-database-of-old-un-leaked-stuff
  7. ^ Keller, Michael (8 April 2013). "Inside the Kissinger Cables". The Daily Beast. Retrieved 9 April 2013. 
  8. ^ Hedges, Chris (5 May 2013). "The Death of Truth". Truthdig. Retrieved 12 May 2013. 
  9. ^ a b MEMORANDUM OF CONVERSATION - AID CUT-OFF:CYPRUS 1975 March 10, 00:00 (Monday)
  10. ^ Goodman, Amy. "WikiLeaks' 'Kissinger Cables' underline the world's debt to Bradley Manning". The Guardian. Retrieved 5 August 2013. "Before the Freedom of Information Act, I used to say at meetings, 'The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer.' [laughter] But since the Freedom of Information Act, I'm afraid to say things like that." 
  11. ^ Smith, Lee. "WikiLeaks’ Insight Into Arafat". Tablet Magazine. Retrieved 5 August 2013. 
  12. ^ Ohlheiser, Abby. "Wikileaks' Latest Release Is a Public Record Archive". Slate. Retrieved 5 August 2013. 
  13. ^ a b "Vatican said Pinochet killings were 'propaganda': leak". AFP. Retrieved 5 August 2013. 
  14. ^ George, P. J. (8 April 2013). "Fernandes ‘sought CIA funding’ during Emergency". Chennai, India: 'The Hindu. Retrieved 5 August 2013.