Kitty Can

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"Kitty Can"
Single by Bee Gees
from the album Idea
A-side "I've Gotta Get a Message to You"
Released 7 September 1968
Format 7", 45rpm
Recorded 12 June 1968
Genre Psychedelic pop
Length 2:31 (mono)
2:38 (stereo)
2:36 (stereo, with orchestra)
Label Polydor (United Kingdom)
Atco (United States)
Writer(s) Barry, Robin & Maurice Gibb
Producer(s) Robert Stigwood, Bee Gees
Bee Gees B-side singles chronology
"The Singer Sang His Song"
(1968)
Kitty Can
(1968)
"Kilburn Towers"
(1968)
Idea track listing

"Kitty Can" is a song by the Bee Gees, released as the B-side of "I've Gotta Get a Message to You" in July 1968, and released as the second track on their album Idea in September 1968.[1][2] It was written and composed by Barry, Robin & Maurice Gibb. Its stereo version faded at 2:38 was released in the US version of the album and the stereo with orchestra version was released in 2006 on The Studio Albums 1967-1968.[3] In 1973, the RSO Records released a compilation called Kitty Can only in Uruguay, and this song appeared as the first track on that album.[4]

Its A-side "I've Gotta Get a Message to You" was not released as a single in the United Kingdom, it was only released in the United States and Australia (on Spin records). From 0:01 to 0:06 the bass by Maurice, Colin's drumming and handclaps was featured. At the 0:07 of the song, the acoustic guitars by Barry and Vince was featured.

The music video of this song features only the three Gibb brothers and not to feature Colin Petersen and Vince Melouney. Robin is notably playing guitar on the video. The video was televised in 192 TV.[5]

Background[edit]

Barry Gibb explained about the song:

The Bee Gees returned to IBC Studios on June 12 after they recorded three songs in Polydor Studios, On that same day, the Bee Gees recorded "Kitty Can", "I.O.I.O.", "Let There Be Love" and "No Name". The song features the acoustic guitar, the Colin's drumming and the harmony by Barry and Maurice especially on the line Eve never pleases me and kitty can sounded like the The Everly Brothers, Barry's vocal sounds less polished than usual.[7]

The demo is similar to the final version but has some additional ad-libbed almost jazz scat backing vocals (probably by Maurice). Maurice’s higher vocal is more prevalent on this version.[8]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "I've Gotta Get a Message to You"   Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb, Maurice Gibb 2:59
2. "Kitty Can"   Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb, Maurice Gibb 2:31

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Discogs.com. "Bee Gees: I've Gotta Get a Message to You / Kitty Can". 
  2. ^ Discogs.com. "Bee Gees: Idea". 
  3. ^ Joseph Brennan. "Gibb Songs: 2006". 
  4. ^ Discogs.com. "Bee Gees: Kitty Can (LP)". 
  5. ^ "The Bee Gees - Kitty Can ( Rare Lost Original Promo Film 1968 Probably French TV 1968 )". YouTube. 2013-06-27. Retrieved 2014-06-07. 
  6. ^ Sandoval, Andrew. "Bee Gees - Idea at Album Liner Notes". Album Liner Notes. Retrieved 21 May 2013. 
  7. ^ Joseph Brennan. "Gibb Songs: 1968". 
  8. ^ Bennett, Kevin (2011-03-22). "Bee Gees Demos – Part 2 | A Kick In The Head". Kickinthehead8inthepants.wordpress.com. Retrieved 2014-06-07. 

External links[edit]